.mnemonic

i just realized i can be a cheater like as always and just write down beverage recipe mnemonics and whatnot on my hand so i dont have to cause unnecessary trouble asking people how to do stuff at work tomorrow and have an internal panic attack at how much of a dumbass i am… but they’ll see i did that but ill be transparent about it like “dude i literallt wanted to write down some stuff cuz i’d forget otherwise haha im such a madman :) ” and htey’ll be like oh ok shes like mostly normal since shes acting unashamed about the fact that she wrote down stuff on her hand for making a bunch of beverages with literally no prior experience and is not expected to be good at it at first at all… and i also wonder if my boss told them about the text i sent like are they all gonna be thinking im about to do something crazy and not trust me just like everybody else. also isnt that just illegal in general

  • When to use flash cards: memorizing words/vocab, numbers, equations, names, dates, and verbatim facts or lines.
  • When to use mnemonic devices: memorizing steps of a process or sets of facts/information/people, especially in an order.
  • When to use concept maps or drawings: learning (rather than memorizing) relationships, processes, concepts, systems, etc.
  • When to use tables or charts: learning or memorizing systems (eg. conjugation in a foreign language), sets of sets of information (eg. people and when they lived and what they did), and other large/complex groups of information.
  • When to use songs: for learning or memorizing anything.
  • Disclaimer: this is a general guideline. If something else works for you, do it!

anonymous asked:

do you have any suggestions on the best workbooks that can help in learning, writing, and talking in Japanese? more the one book is fine, thank you :)

Books & Links to guide your journey in learning Japanese language!

Note: Each set of books is for specific purpose.As a tip, it’s better to focus on one skill at a time. It’s recommended to work on grammar before focusing on learning kanji. With that in mind, here we go!:

…………………………………………

Basic stuff!
Easily learn Hiragana
Easily learn Katakana
Introduction about kanji before you start to learn them

…………………………………………

Book set to master basic Japanese (recommended)
TRY! N5 grammar with CD
TRY! N4 grammar with CD
500 Questions for N5-N4 Practice + grammar review
Dictionary for Basic Japanese Grammar

If you’re unsure of which book to buy, this set is all you need. The amount of time require to finish this set would be around 4 - 8 months. The dictionary is complimentary but so worth to have!

One step further:
TRY! N3 grammar with CD
500 Questions for N3 Practice + grammar review
>> Check out the details of this book set

…………………………………………

Hone Kanji reading skills
Books to learn & practice kanji
>> How to use the book

Indepth Kanji study
Book to guide you to remember kanji easily with mnemonics (for beginners)
Kanji dictionary learners (to guide you on each kanji usage)

…………………………………………

Japanese Conversation/Speaking skill
• Basic survival conversation & situation
–> this book teach basic survival grammar!

Learn Japanese with conversation (shadowing technique)
>> Learn more about both books here

…………………………………………

Reading practice material
Ghibli’s Story book - [Full post]
Easy to read Japanese Manga  - [Full post]
Bilingual Doraemon manga  - [Full post]
>> More books & review here

…………………………………………

Another set to master basic Japanese grammar:

Note: It’s not effective to have a different set of similar book, just pick the set you like the most. If you like Genki better, get a genki set and so on~

If you ask our opinion, Genki is easier with a more detailed English explanation but explained from English point of view.

While minna no nihongo is a very immersive study book but will confuse and discourage some people.

Our recommendation Try set above is somewhere in the middle. It’s immersive but not to confusing and each grammar is explained from Japanese point of view~

Minna no nihongo

Minna no Nihongo Beginners Part 1 book (N5-N4)
Minna no Nihongo Beginners Part 2 book (N5-N4)
Minna no Nihongo set review & links

Genki
Genki 1
Genki workbook 1
Genki 2
Genki workbook 2
Answer key for workbook 1&2

…………………………………………

Hope this helps! Happy learning 。゚✶ฺ.ヽ(*´∀`*)ノ.✶゚ฺ。

study less study smart

I decided to share my notes taken from this amazing 1 hour Youtube lecture by Marty Lobdell. i really liked him and his tips, i think they are super effective and cover a lot of situations! i highly recommend it!!!!! wow

but here are the tips and examples Marty mentions, so if you don’t have the time to go through the full hour, you can just scroll down. hope this helps somebody!

  • Break your study time in chunks with breaks
    • most students lose focus at 25 minutes
    • it’s a mistake to keep going once you do, since you won’t actually learn anything and you’ll hate every minute of it
    • so when you start losing focus take a 5 minute break
    • do something nice like talking to someone or listening to music
    • it’s something you practice so with time you’ll be able to work for more time without losing focus
    • in the end of the study session have a big reward you look forward to
  • Create a study area
    • environment highly affects the way you act. Bedrooms are for sleeping, kitchens for eating: you’ll feel sleepy in your bedroom and hungry in the kitchen. So if you have a study area, it’ll be easier to start studying and staying focused.
    • study in a specific room like an office or school library if you can
    • if you have to study in your bedroom use a specific object you only use for studying: a lamp/desk. Make it a no-distraction, away from your bed, blank walls area.
  •  The more active the learning, the better
    • 80% active learning 20% passive
    • ask yourself: is it a concept or a fact?
    • learning a concept: understand/grasp/know it
      • put it into your own words
      • really think about the meaning of it
      • relate it with something you already know
      • teach somebody else. Recapitulate what you’ve learned. Talk out loud even if you don’t have anyone to teach - talk alone. Or at anyone that listens.
    • learning a fact: memorize it
      • use mnemonics
        • Acronyms (e.g. colours of the rainbow RoyGBiv – red orange yellow green blue indigo violet)
        •  Coined sayings - anything popular or sayings you’ve heard since you were a child.
        • Interacting images – work even better if they’re weird. Creative associations make you never forget specific details. (e.g. 1 gram of fat has 9 calories: picture a fat cat – each cat has 9 lives)
      • any time 2 things are highly similar but not the same you will get maximal interference!! USE mnemonics!! (e.g. afferent vs efferent neurons: SAME - Sensory Afferent Motor Efferent)
  • Be a part of  study groups
    • others can help you in ways you never thought before
  • Recognizing VS remembering
    • never confuse the two
    • while reviewing a chapter you may recognize concepts but not actually know them
    • and when you get to the test you won’t be able to remember any of it
    • so quiz yourself without looking at it
    • or stop in a page of your notes/textbook and ask yourself what is the concept immediately after and before it
  • Get your REM Sleep 
    • get ~8 hours so you don’t undo your studying
    • this is how your brain stores permanent memories
    • without it you’re ability to remember seriously decreases
    • most people don’t even begin to take the advice but it’s simple: sleep better. Do better.
  • There’s 162 hours in a week. There is time.
    • reflect on what you are doing with your time and what activities you have to prioritize to succed as a student
  • Taking notes is vital.
    • right after the class take 5 minutes to expand everything you’ve jotted down, give it depth.
    • NOT hours later. You won’t remember half the things you wrote down.
  • Ask your questions to class mates and teachers.
    • teachers want you to succeed and it’s more than ok to ask your question in the teacher’s office or in the next class
  • How to use a textbook: SQ3R technique
    • Survey Question Read Recite Review
      • Survey: skim through the entire chapter in a couple of minutes.
      • Raise questions: e.g. what is osmosis? What is this graphic about? What is a prototype?
      • it causes you to look for answers and you’ll find the information better once you actually study it after. If you intend to find something you learn it better.
  • Start studying for tests early.
    • don’t undo yourself. You should only be reviewing the days before the test. don’t leave it till the last minute!

(don’t just scroll through this!!!! really think about these methods and how you can actually implement them so you can benefit from them!!! these actually work but only if you put them into practice boo good luck!)

Some of these will not apply to many people so pls take them with a grain of salt. Also I’ve been collecting these pretty much for the two years I’ve been in college so it’s not a guide, they’re just… random I guess.

Making friends 

Warning - specially tailored for super shy people aka me

  • There’s a thing called the ‘first week window of endless oportunities’. It’s when groups are still forming and everyone’s desperate to make friends. This is the time to put your best self forward (I’m not saying be fake, just a little extra friendly).
  • Leave. Your. Door. Open. Do it. Even if you have a roommate. Best way to make friends the first week.
  • Actually get out of your room. You’re not going to meet many people if you hole up in your room. If you have a tv room or people are watching a movie, I don’t care if you’re not interested in what they’re watching, go.
  • If you have the balls to go to the room nextdoor and introduce yourself then you probably can skip this section by all means do it!
  • But if you don’t, going from door to door asking for help with your laundry takes a lot less courage + you will learn how to do laundry. Asking to borrow something (pencil, hair tie, hair dryer) also works.
  • If you’re staying at a residence hall, ask to sit with people at lunch! Nobody is going to say no, i promise.
  • Similarly if you see someone alone, ask them to have lunch with you! 
  • Also if you meet someone you get along with, as soon as you can, ask for their number ‘so you can go to the dinning hall together’. 
  • Remember people’s names - it makes people feel like you actually care about them. I know it’s hard but make an effort. Also it just gets annoying when someone asks about your name for the fourth time. Use mnemonics if you have to.
  • Asking what someone’s major is and where they’re from is standard procedure when you meet them but it doesn’t make for an interesting conversation. Think of other questions!
  • Make sure to arrive about 10 min early to your classes. There’ll be very few people and so it’ll be easier to strike up a conversation (actually people will probably talk to you without you having to say anything which is g r e a t)
  • Say yes - as a rule of thumb, your social life should prevail over your academic life the first two weeks. This is the time where you’re not really pressed for time. Say yes to watching movies, say yes to going to lunch, say yes to going to campus events (and even to parties). Obviously don’t do anything that makes you really unconfortable but do try to step out of your comfort zone
  • Make friends with an upper-classman from your same major. Or at least be on speaking terms. Talk to them on Facebook, ask them about your major, just use any random idc excuse to introduce yourself, it doesn’t really matter how you do it.
  • Don’t go home every weekend, even if you live close by. You’ll miss out on the best of campus life and some of the most fun memories with your new friends.

Keeping your old friends

  • If you know you’re going home for the weekend, try to finish most of your assignments/studying and make time to hang out with your friends. Spending time with them is the best way to keep those friendships alive. 
  • But! Don’t worry too much if you can’t come home or make time for your friends too often, you just have to make an effort to text them regularly. It will come naturally if it’s your best friend, but don’t forget to set a reminder to text other close friends at least once every two weeks.
  • You may think you don’t care now but you will once you come home for the summer.
  • If any of your friends are staying in your hometown for college, be ready for them to get another friend group. That doesn’t mean they’ve forgotten about you, but don’t be mad if they seem to have a lot more plans that don’t involve you. You can always ask to tag along some time and maybe even become friends with these people!
  • Some people you’ll just lose contact with. Don’t fret it.

Organization

  • Please print out or buy a calendar that has a whole page for each month. With boxes preferably *shameless plug*. You may think you have it all under control but there’s nothing like being able to see all your due dates, hang out plans and laundry days at a glance. (Also js but the pilot frixion are perfect to use on calendars because they’re erasable).
  • There’s so much space under your bed. UTILIZE IT.

Keep reading

Easily Differentiate similar Katakana

Shi & N , Tsu & So are made using similar pattern! Use this mnemonics to remember them~

The stroke difference. One is Horizontal while the other is vertical!

Differentiate Ku, Ta and Nu

Happy learning! 。゚✶ฺ.ヽ(*´∀`*)ノ.✶゚ฺ。

…………………………………………

Links:

CrunchyNihongo - Easy to Learn Japanese Lessons Site
Get our easy Japan lessons on your facebook timeline

How i study languages

A couple of days ago @bonbonlanguage asked if i have a post about what i do in order to learn a new language so i thought i should try to make a post about that.

The beginning

As a beginner i always do the same stuff. I research a couple of apps or i just see if my favourite choices have a version for my target language. Usually i use: 

Memrise
Fun Easy Learn
9000 words
50Languages
HiNative
babbel, busuu (rarely but i still have them on my phone)

+some sites and specific apps only for my target language

I choose a grammar book and i take notes from from it. So far i chose books from 3 collections: Teach Yourself, Colloquial and For Dummies.

How i take notes from a book

I ignore the excercises, in my notebook you will see only grammar notes and sometimes irregular verbs at the end, but you will never see exercises. (i’ll say later what i do with the exercises)
If the book has a pretty good structure, i just copy what’s in there. (when i say good structure i mean that i can’t extract main ideas or just a formula              e.g. stem+ending)
The theory is written in black or blue, the examples are written with a pencil and if there is a keyword, i highlight it. When i have languages with articles based on the gender of the words, like French, i use a pink and a light blue pen so when i study the articles i can see the difference. 
Now, i said that in my notebook you won’t see exercises, true, that’s because i solve them on another notebook or just on a blank sheet of paper. If your book has exercises after the grammar lesson, solve them. If half of them are wrong, you will take a break of 1-2 days (in which you will study the grammar rules) and when you feel prepared, you solve again those exercises. (you are allowed to have mistakes but try to have at least 70% of the exercises correct).
What i do after i finish a book
After i finish that grammar book, i take another one. However, this time i don’t copy-paste like i did the first time. I read what informations are there and if there are new rules/exceptions, i just write them on a sticky note and add it to my notebook. After i finish my 2nd book i usually move on to the next stage but if i feel that i missed out something, i take a 3rd book and do what i did with the 2nd one.
As a beginner i have the habit to read my notes once a week, as an intermediate learner i rarely do that.

Don’t understand that as a beginner you only take notes! Sometimes when i get bored i just study on memrise/vocabulary app and that sometimes can last 1 week, sometimes 2. I even like to use InternetPolyglot with my target language and an old target language. (e.g. I learn new words in Spanish through Danish) 

After i have a proper notebook

Usually when i finish my book and i add all the exceptions/rules that i found in the 2nd book i also have learned 1.500-2.000 words in that period of time so i want to test my skills.

When i feel confident enough, i start using duolingo. I use it as a test tool, not as a learning one! I take the shortcuts and usually in 2 days i finish a tree. (at the last part of the tree you don’t have a shortcut for everything so you just have to take the shortcut of every skill there which gets boring)

Since Duolingo is pretty advanced with his lessons, at the end i can consider myself a B1 learner. (if you have an amazing memory and skills, you can say you are B2, but Duolingo can’t get you further than that)

The intermediate stage

Whoever followed my blog for a while knows that i have 2 nightmares in my language learning journey, the intermediate stage and the irregular verbs.

For how to overcome a plateau in the intermediate stage i made a post here. (sooner or later you will hit a plateau)

Back to what i do. No book anymore, duolingo is done, this is the moment when i start to use my skills. If i didn’t use 50Languages as a beginner, i use it now. It has 100 audios so i use them to get used to the sound of the words in case i don’t know them and i also use it as a resources to learn new words. On Memrise i try to find advanced/intermediate and i use 9000 words and Fun Easy Learn. 

At this level the main problem is the lack of vocabulary so i try to learn as many new words as i can. However, since using apps can get boring after a while, i use the classic method of learning vocabulary, reading.

How i memorize/learn new words

Most of the time i just use apps/sites. However, everyone had moments when we couldn’t remember a word regardless of how many times we tried to memorize it. When i have to deal with this, i usually make a mnemonic. (e.g. afslutte = to finish, to end, to conclude; in order to remember the meaning i think at a key sentence: If you don’t study you’ll END up as a slut. [harsh example, i know, but it stays in my mind])

If my mnemonic method doesn’t work, i write the word a couple of times, sometimes with my left hand too since i focus more then. (i’m right-handed) and if i still can’t remember the meaning, i’ll start making some sentences where i’ll use that word.

How i read in my target language

Just as a side note, if i feel confident with my skills (that has happened only once) i read books, if not, i read comics until i feel confident enough to try books.

I have 2 methods because sometimes the first one doesn’t work. So, for French i just read and try to guess the meaning of a word and if i can’t, then i search it. Why i do this for French? It’s easier somehow and i can guess the meaning very well. Sometimes i even highlight words and search the meaning later just to analyze them more.

However, this method doesn’t work on Danish. For Danish i have to read once the entire paragraph and then see what i understood from it. If there is a certain word that it’s unknown, i’ll search it. Since Danish has a lot of structures, i tend to use HiNative to translate those because normal online translators aren’t good for these. After i have all the unknown words, i will look over the paragraph again.

With all these unknown words, i usually make flashcards on Quizlet and practice them from time to time.

Sometimes when i’m in a hurry or i’m not in the mood for studying new words in big quantities, i use WordBrewery or Clozemaster. When i use these i always write the new words on a piece of paper or i just add them directly to Quizlet.

HiNative

I mentioned it above so i should tell you how i use it in order to improve since many might not be familiar to it. It’s an app where you ask questions and natives will answer.  I use HiNative mostly after i read, watch a movie or learn something from memrise.

For what i use it?

- ask for differences
- ask for examples with new words that i didn’t find a context for
- ask for translation from target language to English since not everything is easy to translate as a beginner/intermediate

Listening skills

Listening is a very interesting skill because you can combine it with speaking and reading or just focus only on it.

Listening+reading

In this category you find movies/cartoon/series with subs. Usually i don’t do anything when i watch series/movies because i guess the meaning of the unknown words but if there is a certain word that i can’t understand, i will write it down and search it’s meaning.

Listening+speaking

This involves 2 things. I either talk to someone or i just talk to myself/a toy/the cat. I tend to use the 2nd method most of the time. (it’s not that i dislike talking, i just don’t feel confident enough to use my skills until i’m not sure that i know most of the things/vocab i need to know). I start the conversation like “hey, how are you?” and then i ask myself “how was your day?”. For this question i have to make 2 answers, the reality with what has happened, and an imaginary version for my other side who’s “talking”.

Listening

Here i just watch videos on youtube, listen to 50languages, a podcast or songs. If i do listen to songs, sometimes i try to find the lyrics and see if i understand everything, if not, i’ll look for the unknown words and after i start to sing too. (disney songs are great because most have lyrics on youtube already)

Writing skills

Here i have 2 choices, i either find someone or i just write in a notebook/diary. The purpose of this is to figure out what vocab/structures/expressions i don’t know. 

Speaking skills

It’s not that i dislike talking, i just focus on this skill at the end usually. I improve my other skills and the speaking one improves in a weird way too. However, at some point i just ask people who i know for a long time and i feel comfortable with to talk to me on skype/on the phone.

Extra

Idioms are everywhere in a language. At some point you have to deal with them. If i find them on memrise, i study them there, if not, i’ll look for them and make flashcards. These flashcards have only the idiom in my target language on them and that’s it. I don’t write the translation. I force myself to remember the meaning.

Also, when i don’t know the pronunciation for something, i use Forvo.

The advanced stage

Here i just learn idioms and some advanced vocabulary at the beginning. After these, i stop caring. I consider my learning journey almost done so i just enjoy my life using the language. I read without worrying that i don’t know words, i watch shows without worrying that i don’t understand what i hear, i can sing without worrying that i just say words with no meaning but similar sounds to what i hear.

Note: This is how I learn languages. I can’t say it will work for everyone but it works for me.

p.s. sometimes Fun Easy Learn and 50Languages are set in another language, not my native one or English.

ANTIBIOTICS CHEAT SHEET :)

Also, REMEMBER!!!!

* Sulfonamides compete for albumin with:

  • Bilirrubin: given in 2°,3°T, high risk or indirect hyperBb and kernicterus in premies
  • Warfarin: increases toxicity: bleeding

Beta-lactamase (penicinillase) Suceptible:

  • Natural Penicillins (G, V, F, K)
  • Aminopenicillins (Amoxicillin, Ampicillin)
  • Antipseudomonal Penicillins (Ticarcillin, Piperacillin)

Beta-lactamase (penicinillase) Resistant:

  • Oxacillin, Nafcillin, Dicloxacillin
  • 3°G, 4°G Cephalosporins
  • Carbapenems 
  • Monobactams
  • Beta-lactamase inhibitors

* Penicillins enhanced with:

  • Clavulanic acid & Sulbactam (both are suicide inhibitors, they inhibit beta-lactamase)
  • Aminoglycosides (against enterococcus and psedomonas)

Aminoglycosides enhanced with Aztreonam

* Penicillins: renal clearance EXCEPT Oxacillin & Nafcillin (bile)

* Cephalosporines: renal clearance EXCEPT Cefoperazone & Cefrtriaxone (bile)

* Both inhibited by Probenecid during tubular secretion.

* 2°G Cephalosporines: none cross BBB except Cefuroxime

* 3°G Cephalosporines: all cross BBB except Cefoperazone bc is highly highly lipid soluble, so is protein bound in plasma, therefore it doesn’t cross BBB.

* Cephalosporines are "LAME“ bc they  do not cover this organisms 

  • L  isteria monocytogenes
  • A  typicals (Mycoplasma, Chlamydia)
  • RSA (except Ceftaroline, 5°G)
  •  nterococci

* Disulfiram-like effect: Cefotetan Cefoperazone (mnemonic)

* Cefoperanzone: all the exceptions!!!

  • All 3°G cephalosporins cross the BBB except Cefoperazone.
  • All cephalosporins are renal cleared, except Cefoperazone.
  • Disulfiram-like effect

* Against Pseudomonas:

  • 3°G Cef taz idime (taz taz taz taz)
  • 4°G Cefepime, Cefpirome (not available in the USA)
  • Antipseudomonal penicillins
  • Aminoglycosides (synergy with beta-lactams)
  • Aztreonam (pseudomonal sepsis)

* Covers MRSA: Ceftaroline (rhymes w/ Caroline, Caroline the 5°G Ceph), Vancomycin, Daptomycin, Linezolid, Tigecycline.

Covers VRSA: Linezolid, Dalfopristin/Quinupristin

* Aminoglycosides: decrease release of ACh in synapse and act as a Neuromuscular blocker, this is why it enhances effects of muscle relaxants.

* DEMECLOCYCLINE: tetracycline that’s not used as an AB, it is used as tx of SIADH to cause Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus (inhibits the V2 receptor in collecting ducts)

* Phototoxicity: Q ue S T  ion?

  • uinolones
  • Sulfonamides
  • T etracyclines

* p450 inhibitors: Cloramphenicol, Macrolides (except Azithromycin), Sulfonamides

* Macrolides SE: Motilin stimulation, QT prolongation, reversible deafness, eosinophilia, cholestatic hepatitis

Bactericidal: beta-lactams (penicillins, cephalosporins, monobactams, carbapenems), aminoglycosides, fluorquinolones, metronidazole.

* Baceriostatic: tetracyclins, streptogramins, chloramphenicol, lincosamides, oxazolidonones, macrolides, sulfonamides, DHFR inhibitors.

Pseudomembranous colitis: Ampicillin, Amoxicillin, Clindamycin, Lincomycin.

QT prolongation: macrolides, sometimes fluoroquinolones

Coagulation cascade made simple.

Someone shared this with me on my surgery clerkship and I wanted to pass it forward. 

1) Everything centers around the perfect 10

2) 7 is a lucky number so I keep it to myself

3) 8 and 5 are cofactors

4) 3, 4, 6 do not exist

5) When you draw it out, it looks like a gun, and your trigger finger (TF) would go by the 7. so TF (tissue factor) goes by 7

6) You use guns and trigger fingers in war, so that’s the part effected by warfarin. The other one is heparin

7) The shorter path has the test with fewer letters (PT). The longer path has the test with more letters (PTT).

The last “rule” was told to me by someone else, but it helps me every time, so I’ll include it here:

8) PET is WET (PT, extrinsic, warfarin) and [Brad] PITT is a HIT (PTT, intrinsic, heparin)

Introducing Language Printables

My boyfriend and I are trying to save up so we can rent a new place and get married, so we have been working hard on a new project: Japanese Learning Printables, which we’re selling on Etsy. He’s a professional graphic designer and I have been teaching languages since 2003, so we decided to put our professional skills together and design some products that we hope Japanese learners will find useful.

Here’s a brief overview of what we’ve made so far:
Language Study Printables Pack 1

This bundle contains eight different printables in PDF format, both in A4 and letter size. Colour and black and white versions are included.

There are New Kanji blank sheets for you to practice kanji, with spaces for mnemonics, stroke order, on’yomi and kun’yomi, example sentences and more. Language Exchange sheets allow you to document new vocabulary and phrases, as well as cultural points as you participate in language exchange, meaning you get more out of your experience and can review afterwards. There’s also space for feedback for your partner and goal tracking. 

To increase productivity you can track your reading and study hours with these Reading Log and Study Log pages.

To keep track of new words or compounds you can use our New Vocabulary sheet, with space for readings, example sentences, so you can lean in context, and review tracking included.
Learning in real-life context is particularly difficult for self-studiers, so with this in mind we designed  this Grocery List printable, which you prepare at home, as you would a normal list, then take shopping so that you can use Japanese in context, even if you’re in a non-Japanese environment. 
Also included in the Language Study Printables Pack 1 are Anime Log and Drama Log trackers, where you can note down examples of words in context you encounter when watching Japanese TV, track where and when you heard them and monitor your reviews.

Beginners, Intermediate and Advanced Journal Prompt Printables
There are three different levels available individually, or you can buy the bundle and get all three at a discount.  Again the printables come in PDF format, including both A4 and letter size versions.

Designed with self-studiers in mind, these packs cover basic to advanced Japanese, including topics on your interests, memories, goals, as well as your opinions on a variety of current events, cultural points and social issues.

Each pack contains 31 unique language prompts, one for every day of the month.

  • Beginners Journal Prompts should be good for self-studiers who are at around JLPT N5/N4 level, or who are working through Genki I and II. Topics include writing about your environment and interests, whilst giving you opportunities to use beginner level grammar and vocabulary. An English translation cheat sheet is included to help you if you get lost. 
  • Intermediate Journal Prompts would best suit those at about JLPT N3/N2, or working through a textbook like Tobira.  Topics include writing for different purposes, talking about culture, re-telling anecdotes and expressing your opinions. An English translation cheat sheet is included to help you if you get lost.
  • Advanced Journal Prompts are designed for those at N2/N1 JLPT level, or beyond. They are written by a native Japanese speaker and are designed to help you create independent texts on engaging and relevant topics, whilst using advanced language skills such as persuasion, criticism, and expressing nuanced opinions that often appears at this level.

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This one’s about bugs

Guys, I love ID. I really hope I get to do an ID rotation on Medicine. If you remember, I once posted the mnemonic I swear by for viruses. Well here is the bacteria counterpart. Also your micro mantra should be: sketchy is life. Love Andrew like I do (this part’s not the mantra, I just love Andrew).

Let me know if you have any questions or need clarification. This is a perfect example of a “not aesthetically pleasing tumblr study post” because sometimes your handwriting sucks and you aint got that kinda time in my life for pretty arrows and banners and I just wanna finish this shit so I can leave the library when will Step 1 even be over why is this my liiiiiife