.growing up

Adult CPR

I just got certified in CPR yesterday with the American Heart Association. I wanted to share this information with you, because a lot of what we see on TV is not at all accurate as to what you’re supposed to do to actually help someone. I will also post child and infant CPR at sometime! 

Adult CPR

  • Before starting CPR on somebody, look around and make sure that the scene is safe. You’re no help to anybody if you’re also hurt.
  • Kneel down on the side of the the person and hit their shoulders hard with both your hands. Shout: “Are you okay?”
    • If they’re responsive, call 911. Responsive means blinking, moving, moaning, etc.
  • If they’re unresponsive, check to see if they’re breathing. Scan their chest for only 10 seconds to watch for breath.
    • If they’re breathing normally and unresponsive, call 911.
  • If they’re unresponsive and not breathing or breathing irregularly, you will need to start CPR. Every minute that passes without CPR, the chance of their survival goes down by 7-10%.
  • Shout: “Help! I need help!”
  •  If someone comes to help you, have them call 911 and get an AED device.
    • If no one comes to help you, call 911 yourself and put the phone on speaker.
  • The person will need to be lying on a flat surface for you to be able to perform CPR on them. If you need to move them do so quickly and don’t worry about hurting them. Time is of the essence. 
  • Begin performing CPR on the person. Press down in the middle of their chest at a depth of two inches. 
    • The number one mistake that people make when performing CPR is not pressing hard/deep enough. You’re not strong enough to break bones, and if you do hear a crack you’re breaking their sternum, not bones. It’s better to have broken sternum than to be dead.
  • You want to do 30 compression reps, going at the rhythm of the song “Staying Alive” by the Bee Gees. I’m not kidding you, this is what the trained EMS tech actually told me. This is a rate of 110 to 120 compression reps per minute. Count each rep out loud.
    • Your hands should not be leaving the person’s chest in between the reps. 
    • The chest should be rising back to its original form in between reps.
  • After 30 compression reps, deliver 2 short breaths to the person.
  • Tilt their head back until their neck is hyper extended and open their mouth.
    • You should be able to watch the person’s chest rise with your breath. If it isn’t, you’re not breathing hard enough.
  • After the 2 breaths, resume the 30 compression reps.
  • Continue alternating 30 compressions with 2 breaths until an AED device arrives, or emergency services arrives. 
    • If someone is there with you who also knows CPR, they can switch with you after the 2 breaths. Compressions are exhausting to do.
    • If an AED device (pictured below) does arrive, open the box and turn the power on. The device will literally give you instructions as to how to use it. It essentially is an automated shock device that tries to restart the person’s heart.
Listen.

It’s not okay to have your child be scared of you. That isn’t respect. That’s control. 

It’s not okay to have your child obey you at all times in order for you to love them. That isn’t high standards. That’s manipulation.

It’s not okay to force your child become what you wanted to become. That isn’t wanting the best for them. That’s living vicariously through them.

It’s not okay to take away your child’s basic needs as a punishment. That isn’t teaching them. That’s hindering them. 

It’s not okay to dictate your child’s sexuality or gender. That isn’t normalizing them. That’s repressing them.

It’s not okay to berate your child’s appearance or intelligence for being what you think is sub-par. That isn’t toughening them. That’s bullying them.

It’s not okay to take out your stress on your child. That isn’t parenting. That is abusing.

It’s completely okay to distance yourself from your parents. That’s not unloving. That, sometimes, is self care.

Longs term effects of emotional abuse:

• a distrust in your perceptions

• a tendency to be fearful or on guard

• self-consciousness or fear of how you are coming across

• an inability to be spontaneous

• a distrust of people and in future relationships

• anger that bursts out unexpectedly

• sensitivity to anyone trying to control you

• the feeling of anxiety when someone lets you decide

• withdrawal from social interactions

• unexplainable feelings of shame/guilt

• unusual weight gain/loss

• changes in appetite

• unexplained anxiety or depression states

• self destructive behavior

• isolation from friends/family

• substance abuse

Masterposts

10 Gift Ideas for The Broke Person: Gift giving can get expensive. Here’s how to work it into your budget. Click here.

Adulting: I make weekly “Adulting” posts that cover food, cleaning, saving money, and living on your own. Click here.

Balancing a Checkbook: How to balance a checkbook (and some relationship advice). Click here.

Budgeting on Minimum Wage: Some tips/tricks to living off a minimum wage budget. I also offer example budgets based on full time and part time minimum wage salaries.  Click here.

Car Insurance: Looking into car insurance but unsure where to start? Click here.

First Apartment: Learn how to look for apartments, set up your utilities, plus general first apartment advice. Click here.

Gym memberships: My weirdly popular post about gym membership. Click here.

Jobs: My post with helpful links to cover letter and resume writing. Click here.

Living on Your Own: Transitioning from a roommate situation to living on your own for the first time? Click here.

Living on Your Own (With Cats): My personal favorite post, detailing how to live on your own with cats and not loose your mind. Click here.

Long Distance: Advice on long distance relationships. Click here.

Meal Tips: My quintessential guide to feeding yourself on a student or small budget. Click here.

Paper Organization: Learn how to keep your important documents in order. Click here.

Renting vs. Student Housing: Weigh the pros and cons of renting off campus and living on campus. Click here.

Storage: I get so many storage related questions. Here are some thoughts on storage in small apartments and dorm rooms. Click here.

Tomato Sauce: Here’s a post entirely devoted to making tomato sauce. It’s cheap, easy to make, and so delicious. Click here.

“Are You A Feminist?”


I am five years old. My mother just told me to go fetch a sweater because an adult man would be coming over soon, and I need to cover up.

I am seven years old. A boy wouldn’t stop chasing me on the playground and throwing rocks at me. I’m upset. My best friend says it’s because he likes me and she told me boys are mean to girls they like.

I am ten years old. We just had our first health class in school. The teachers were trying to educate us on sexual assault. After class, my friends told me to scream fire instead of rape if I’m ever being attacked, because no one will come if they hear the word rape being screamed.

I am twelve years old. I just got my first period. A pad fell out of my book bag at school and everyone started laughing. Apparently, periods aren’t normal and they should be hidden at all costs.

I am fifteen years old. I’m in the office crying because a boy I don’t know kept following me down the hallway and grabbing my ass even after I told him to stop. The administrator scolds me.
“maybe you shouldn’t be wearing leggings if you don’t want that kind of attention”
she sends me home with a dress code violation. She marked the “distracting” box.

I am seventeen years old. I’ve just been slapped because a boy got angry with me after I wouldn’t let him put his hands down my pants. Apparently, I led him on by letting him copy my math assignment.

I am twenty-one years old. My best friend has bought me special nail polish to wear to the bar. She says it changes color if it’s dipped in a drink that has a date rape drug in it.

I am twenty-three years old. I’m reading this to the first class I will ever teach. A student raises her hand and says, “no offense, but doesn’t this stuff happen to every girl?”


So yes, I am a feminist. And when you ask me why, I will read this to you. Again, and again, and again.

—  v.j.v
instagram

Everything is temporary.

Adulting 105

This week I’m giving a shoutout to my fav person ever @poorpersonsgiude. You go girl! Also @stormfallss for lighting up my phone for over two hours the other night. Thanks for the love.

1. Keep paper bills. Bills such as internet, rent, and utility for up to five months. These help prove residency, which will be useful when applying for Medicaid, in-state tuition, and for some jobs. If you’re not receiving any sort of paper bills, keep pay stubs with your address on them instead.

2. Cheap salt. Never spend more than a dollar on salt. Seriously. Chain supermarkets and dollar stores will sell large quantities of it to you for 99 cents. You’re not the Queen of Sheba- you don’t need $5 salt.

3. Wooden floors. If any part of you apartment/dorm room has a wooden floor, consider buying Bona Hardwood Cleaner. It’s a little pricey, but my last squeeze bottle lasted me just short of a year. It’s the best wood cleaner around.

4. Postage stamps. You don’t have to go to your local post office to buy stamps (which is great because sometimes it’s not “local” at all). You can purchase them at pharmacy centers like CVS or Rite Aid, as well as large chain supermarkets such as Stop & Shop and Walmart. 

5. Moisturizers. Pick up at least one moisturizer to save your hands during these long winter months. If you’re a newbie just buy Gold Bond, it’s cheap and good for everything except your face. 

6. Shower heads. If you have a terrible apartment shower head with no water pressure buy yourself a better one. There a color changing shower heads on Amazon that I personally swear by. Just be sure to keep the original shower head and to replace it when you move out.

7. Keep your student ID card. Even after you stop attending school. You’ll still be able to receive student discounts at places like museums and cinemas. They have no way of knowing if you’re still a student. What are they gonna do- call your school? I do this all the time! 

8. Yankee Candle. Is so expensive, but it’s the only candle really worth buying. I’ve tried all sorts of discount candles from dollar stores and even from Target, but none of them smell even half as good as Yankee Candle.

9. Reminders. Forgetting important things such as bill payments, birthdays, or contraceptives? Set alarms and reminders on your Iphone to help you stay on top. I personally hate the Iphone calendar app so I downloaded Cozi (it’s free) and I use that instead.

10. Clean that fridge. Try to purge your fridge out at least once a month. There’s nothing more disgusting than food so decomposed that you can’t discern what it once was. The general rule of thumb about leftovers is if you don’t eat it within the next two days you won’t ever eat it. Try to give your fridge a sponge bath every three months, the shelves are easy to remove and I just wash them in my sink.