*twows

10

The northern girl. Winterfell’s daughter.

sansa stark + motifs and themes | the north / home / house stark

3

Arianne missed Ser Arys too, more than she ever would have thought. He loved me madly, she told herself, yet I was never more than fond of him. I made use of him in my bed and in my plot, took his love and took his honor, gave him nothing but my body. In the end he could not live with what we’d done. Why else would her white knight have charged right into Areo Hotah’s longaxe, to die the way he did? I was a foolish willful girl, playing at the game of thrones like a drunkard rolling dice. ― Arianne I, The Winds of Winter.

By the time we got to Weathertop, Tolkien had me. ‘Gil-Galad was an elven king,’ Sam Gamgee recited, ‘of him the harpers sadly sing.’ A chill went through me, such as Conan and Kull had never evoked.

Almost forty years later, I find myself in the middle of my own high fantasy, A Song of Ice and Fire. The books are huge, and hugely complex, and take me years to write. Within days of each volume being published, I begin to get emails asking when the next is coming out. “You do not know how hard it is to wait,’ some of my readers cry plaintively. I do, I want to tell them, I know just how hard it is. I waited too. When I finished The Fellowship of the Ring, it was the only volume out in paperback. I had to wait for Ace to bring out The Two Towers, and again for The Return of the King. Not a long wait, admittedly, yet somehow it seemed like decades. The moment I got my hands on the next volume I put everything else aside so I could read it … but halfway through The Return of the King, I slowed down. Only a few hundred pages remained, and once they were done, I would never be able to read Lord of the Rings for the first time again. As much as I wanted to know how it all came out, I did not want the experience to be over.

That was how fiercely I loved those books, as a reader.
—  George R.R. Martin, discussing “the ancestors of Ice and Fire” in “The Heirs of Turtle Castle” from Dreamsongs

A speculative hill that I am willing to die on: that Sansa will interact with certain Freys during her time in the Vale. Likely at the Tourney for the Brotherhood of the Winged Knights, but also afterwards. Namely:

  • Maester Willamen, especially since the plot point of old Lord Hunter’s murder and House Hunter’s succession was something mentioned by Littlefinger.
  • Cynthea Frey, nine years old, a ward of Lady Anya Waynwood (just like Harry is, hmm). As her mother’s a Waynwood, she might be Anya’s granddaughter or niece.
  • Sandor Frey, Cynthea’s brother, twelve years old, squire of Lady Anya’s son Ser Donnel – and note Alayne has already met Anya’s son Wallace and grandson Roland.

I mean, I don’t know what’s going to happen… but look, GRRM wouldn’t put a boy of Sansa’s age named Sandor, of House Frey, of Crakehall blood (and therefore probably huge like his first cousin Little Walder) in a situation like this if he weren’t planning something. Seriously.

2

Arianne missed Ser Arys too, more than she ever would have thought. He loved me madly, she told herself, yet I was never more than fond of him. I made use of him in my bed and in my plot, took his love and took his honor, gave him nothing but my body. In the end he could not live with what we’d done. Why else would her white knight have charged right into Areo Hotah’s longaxe, to die the way he did? I was a foolish willful girl, playing at the game of thrones like a drunkard rolling dice. ― Arianne I, The Winds of Winter.