*shapleys

This mathematical principle reveals the best way to get anything you want in life

Whether it’s landing your dream job or getting the girl, a basic mathematical principle can help you in almost any situation.

That’s according to Hannah Fry, a mathematician at the UCL Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis in London and author of new book, “The Mathematics of Love.”

She describes the “stable marriage problem,” or the challenge of matching two entities so that neither would be better off in another match, and explains the Gale-Shapley matching algorithm often used to solve it. Exploiting this algorithm can be a great strategy for getting what you want.

Here’s how it works: Fry uses the example of three boys talking to three girls at a party. Each has their own ordered list of who they’d prefer to go home with.

If this was a 1950s-style dating scenario and the boys approached the girls, each boy would hit on his top-choice girl, Fry explains. If a girl has multiple offers, she’d choose the boy she preferred most, and if a boy were rejected, he’d approach his second-choice girl.

The result is pretty great for the boys. They each get their first or second-choice partners, and there’s no way they could improve, since the top choice has said yes or already rejected them.

The girls fare relatively worse, however, having paired up with their second and third-choice partners.

Fry writes:

Regardless of how many boys and girls there are, it turns out that whenever the boys do the approaching, there are four outcomes that will be true:

1. Everyone will find a partner.

2. Once all partners are determined, no man and woman in different couples could both improve their happiness by running off together.

3. Once all partners are determined, every man will have the best partner available to him.

4. Once all partners are determined, every woman will end up with the least bad of all the men who approach her.

Essentially, whoever does the asking (and is willing to face rejection until achieving the best option available to them) is better off. Meanwhile, the person who sits back and waits for advances settles for the least bad option on the table.

The Gale-Shapley matching algorithm applies to plenty of situations beyond weekend hook ups — like, say, hiring.

For example, a hiring manager who posts a job listing and lets the résumés roll in ultimately hires the best of the candidates who applied. But of course, that’s a limited pool. On the other hand, a hiring manager who reaches out to the best professionals in the field and ends up with her third choice is still more likely to have a better candidate than those who responded to the listing.

By the same token, a job seeker who approaches all the companies he wants to work for, starting at the top of his list, ends up with the best employer available to him.

The US National Resident Matching Program uses this strategy to match doctors with hospitals so that everyone is happy. Prior to the ’50s, Fry says hospitals reached out to the students they wanted, and the students accepted the least bad offers. But the organisers realised that doctors often had to relocate and weren’t always happy with their options. To create a better system, they decided to flip the scenario and let doctors approach the hospitals they liked best.

Fry says the algorithm has been similarly applied to the assignments of dental residents, Canadian lawyers, and high-school students.

“Regardless of the type of relationship you’re after,” concludes Fry, “it pays to take the initiative.”

This mathematical principle reveals the best way to get anything you want in life

Whether it’s landing your dream job or getting the girl, a basic mathematical principle can help you in almost any situation.

That’s according to Hannah Fry, a mathematician at the UCL Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis in London and author of new book, “The Mathematics of Love.”

She describes the “stable marriage problem,” or the challenge of matching two entities so that neither would be better off in another match, and explains the Gale-Shapley matching algorithm often used to solve it. Exploiting this algorithm can be a great strategy for getting what you want. 

Here’s how it works: Fry uses the example of three boys talking to three girls at a party. Each has their own ordered list of who they’d prefer to go home with.

If this was a 1950s-style dating scenario and the boys approached the girls, each boy would hit on his top-choice girl, Fry explains. If a girl has multiple offers, she’d choose the boy she preferred most, and if a boy were rejected, he’d approach his second-choice girl.

The result is pretty great for the boys. They each get their first or second-choice partners, and there’s no way they could improve, since the top choice has said yes or already rejected them.

The girls fare relatively worse, however, having paired up with their second and third-choice partners.

Fry writes:

Regardless of how many boys and girls there are, it turns out that whenever the boys do the approaching, there are four outcomes that will be true:

1. Everyone will find a partner.

2. Once all partners are determined, no man and woman in different couples could both improve their happiness by running off together.

3. Once all partners are determined, every man will have the best partner available to him.

4. Once all partners are determined, every woman will end up with the least bad of all the men who approach her.

Essentially, whoever does the asking (and is willing to face rejection until achieving the best option available to them) is better off. Meanwhile, the person who sits back and waits for advances settles for the least bad option on the table.

The Gale-Shapley matching algorithm applies to plenty of situations beyond weekend hook ups — like, say, hiring.

For example, a hiring manager who posts a job listing and lets the résumés roll in ultimately hires the best of the candidates who applied. But of course, that’s a limited pool. On the other hand, a hiring manager who reaches out to the best professionals in the field and ends up with her third choice is still more likely to have a better candidate than those who responded to the listing.

By the same token, a job seeker who approaches all the companies he wants to work for, starting at the top of his list, ends up with the best employer available to him.

The US National Resident Matching Program uses this strategy to match doctors with hospitals so that everyone is happy. Prior to the ‘50s, Fry says hospitals reached out to the students they wanted, and the students accepted the least bad offers. But the organizers realized that doctors often had to relocate and weren’t always happy with their options. To create a better system, they decided to flip the scenario and let doctors approach the hospitals they liked best.

Fry says the algorithm has been similarly applied to the assignments of dental residents, Canadian lawyers, and high-school students.

“Regardless of the type of relationship you’re after,” concludes Fry, “it pays to take the initiative." 

Watch Fry’s TED Talk on the mathematics of love:

SEE ALSO: A mathematical formula reveals the secret to lasting relationships

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: We did the math: Is an MBA worth it?












from Business Insider http://ift.tt/1KqKRkt
John Forbes Nash Jr. (1928–2015)

See on Scoop.it - Edgar Analytics & Complex Systems

In the fall of 1949, many graduate students at Princeton University were assigned rooms in the Graduate College. In one suite, John Nash inhabited a single room, while I shared the double with Lloyd Shapley. John and Lloyd were the mathematicians and I was the economist, and together we pursued our interest in game theory. John was one of the youngest students at the Graduate College. He was from West Virginia, where his father was an engineer and his mother a Latin teacher. He graduated from the Carnegie Institute of Technology with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mathematics, and arrived at the math department in Princeton in 1948.

John Forbes Nash Jr. (1928–2015)
Martin Shubik

Science 19 June 2015:
Vol. 348 no. 6241 p. 1324
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aac7085 ;


See on sciencemag.org

@bri_way 🙌CONGRATS🙌 1ST PLACE POST‼️Your post was selected for winning this week’s Social Media Progress PiX contest with this winning entry from week ending 5/23❗️ Enjoy your extra 1⃣5⃣% OFF in addition to any other applicable discount including the Preferred Membership Club Discount Rate on any one future purchase with Xpert Nutrition! #socialmediaprogresspix #progresspix #contestwinner #additionalfifteenpercentdiscount #xpertnutrition #xpertdemogirl @xpertdemogirl
#Repost @bri_way
・・・
Sometimes you find a well lit room with a mirror and you just have to snap a progress selfie. The top picture was January 11, the bottom was lastnight. Happy to definitely see shape in my shoulders and arms. Had a big issue for awhile because the scale dropped down almost 6 lbs then went back up 5lbs. Pretty much sitting steady between 129-131lbs but I’m so much stronger, and much more Shapley 😜 now if I could just not be so sore from all the PRs this week that would be great! Happy #flexfriday everyone!!! #shreddingseason #gains #carbcycyle #fitchicks #girlswholift #liftheavy #weights #weEATalot #shoulders #arms #quads #getfit #absarecoming #npccompetitor #ocbcompetitior #figurecompetitior #iifym #naturalbodybuilding #fitfam #fitcouples #coupleswholift #simplifiednutrition #rocksmySOCKS #ihavethebestcoachever #teamrtsf #xpertnutrition (at Xpert Nutrition)

……………………………………………………..Monday

White Article: This mathematical principle reveals the best way to get anything you want in life: Take the Initiative.

Whether it’s landing your dream job or getting the girl, a basic mathematical principle can help you in almost any situation.

That’s according to Hannah Fry, a mathematician at the UCL Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis in London and author of the new book “The Mathematics of Love.”

She describes the “stable marriage problem,” or the challenge of matching two entities so that neither would be better off in another match, and explains the Gale-Shapley matching algorithm often used to solve it. Exploiting this algorithm can be a great strategy for getting what you want.

Here’s how it works: Fry uses the example of three boys talking to three girls at a party. Each participant has an ordered list of who is most suitable to go home with.

If this was a 1950s-style dating scenario in which the boys approached the girls, each boy would hit on his top-choice girl, Fry says. If a girl has multiple offers, she would choose the boy she preferred most, and if a boy were rejected, he would approach his second-choice girl.

The result is pretty great for the boys. Each gets his first- or second-choice partner, and there is no way the boys could improve, because their top choices have said yes or already rejected them.

The girls fare relatively worse, however, having paired up with their second- or third-choice partners.

Fry writes:

Regardless of how many boys and girls there are, it turns out that whenever the boys do the approaching, there are four outcomes that will be true:

1. Everyone will find a partner.

2. Once all partners are determined, no man and woman in different couples could both improve their happiness by running off together.

3. Once all partners are determined, every man will have the best partner available to him.

4. Once all partners are determined, every woman will end up with the least bad of all the men who approach her.

Essentially, whoever does the asking (and is willing to face rejection until achieving the best available option) is better off. Meanwhile, the person who sits back and waits for advances settles for the least bad option on the table.

The Gale-Shapley matching algorithm applies to plenty of situations beyond weekend hookups — including, say, hiring.

For example, a hiring manager who posts a job listing and lets the résumés roll in ultimately hires the best of the candidates who applied. But of course, that’s a limited pool. On the other hand, a hiring manager who reaches out to the best professionals in the field and ends up with his or her third choice is still more likely to have a better candidate.

By the same token, a job seeker who approaches all the companies he or she wants to work for, starting with the most desirable, ends up with the best available employer.

The US National Resident Matching Program uses this strategy to match doctors with hospitals so that everyone is happy. Prior to the ‘50s, Fry says, hospitals reached out to the students they wanted, and the students accepted the least bad offers. But the organizers realized that doctors often had to relocate and weren’t always happy with their options. To create a better system, they decided to flip the scenario and let doctors approach the hospitals they liked best.

Fry says the algorithm has been similarly applied to the assignments of dental residents, Canadian lawyers, and high-school students.

“Regardless of the type of relationship you’re after,” Fry concludes, “it pays to take the initiative.”

Watch this: http://www.ted.com/talks/hannah_fry_the_mathematics_of_love

Source: JENNA GOUDREAU, for Business Insider, Jun. 30, 2015

arxiv.org
[1507.00721] Physical Properties of a Pilot Sample of Spectroscopic Close Pair Galaxies at z ~ 2

[ Authors ]
David R. Law, Alice E. Shapley, Jade Checlair, Charles C. Steidel
[ Abstract ]
We use Hubble Space Telescope Wide-Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) rest-frame optical imaging to select a pilot sample of star-forming galaxies in the redshift range z = 2.00-2.65 whose multi-component morphologies are consistent with expectations for major mergers. We follow up this sample of major merger candidates with Keck/NIRSPEC longslit spectroscopy obtained in excellent seeing conditions (FWHM ~ 0.5 arcsec) to obtain Halpha-based redshifts of each of the morphological components in order to distinguish spectroscopic pairs from false pairs created by projection along the line of sight. Of six pair candidates observed, companions (estimated mass ratios 5:1 and 7:1) are detected for two galaxies down to a 3sigma limiting emission-line flux of ~ 10^{-17} erg/s/cm2. This detection rate is consistent with a ~ 50% false pair fraction at such angular separations (1-2 arcsec), and with recent claims that the star-formation rate (SFR) can differ by an order of magnitude between the components in such mergers. The two spectroscopic pairs identified have total SFR, SFR surface densities, and stellar masses consistent on average with the overall z ~ 2 star forming galaxy population.

riverkeeper.org
UPCOMING EVENT: JULY 7: Radio Interview: Wallkill River and Watershed Water Quality | Riverkeeper
Patricia Henigan and Brenda Bowers paddle the Wallkill River. (Photo by Dan Shapley) Tune into WDST 100.1 FM or listen live for an interview about the

When:July 7, 2015: 8:00AM to 9:00AM

Where:On Air - WDST 100.1 FM- 

“Tune into WDST 100.1 FM or listen live for an interview about the Wallkill River and water quality in the Hudson River watershed.

Jason West, the coordinator of the new Wallkill River Watershed Alliance, and Dan Shapley, Riverkeeper Water Quality Program Manager, will talk to Jimmy Buff, WDST’s program director and morning show host.

We’ll discuss the early work of the newly formed Wallkill River Watershed Alliance, including results of the first and second Boat Brigades.We’ll also talk about the next meeting of the Wallkill River Watershed Alliance, July 15 at 7 p.m. at New Paltz Village Hall; the next citizen Boat Brigade departing from the DEC boat launch on Springton Road in Rosendale on July 25 at 9 a.m.

And we’ll talk about some of the results of Riverkeeper’s annual water quality report: “How’s the Water?” which provides new information about the results of water quality in tributaries of the Hudson River, including the Rondout and Wallkill watershed, where partners help Riverkeeper sample 43 locations monthly.” 

arxiv.org
[1506.08201] A High-Resolution Hubble Space Telescope Study of Lyman Continuum Leakers at $z\sim3$

[ Authors ]
Robin E. Mostardi, Alice E. Shapley, Charles C. Steidel, Ryan F. Trainor, Naveen A. Reddy, Brian Siana
[ Abstract ]
We present $U_{336}V_{606}J_{125}H_{160}$ follow-up $HST$ observations of 16 $z\sim3$ candidate LyC emitters in the HS1549+1933 field. With these data, we obtain high spatial-resolution photometric redshifts of all sub-arcsecond components of the LyC candidates in order to eliminate foreground contamination and identify robust candidates for leaking LyC emission. Of the 16 candidates, we find one object with a robust LyC detection that is not due to foreground contamination. This object (MD5) resolves into two components; we refer to the LyC-emitting component as MD5b. MD5b has an observed 1500\AA\ to 900\AA\ flux-density ratio of $(F_{UV}/F_{LyC})_{obs}=4.0\pm2.0$, compatible with predictions from stellar population synthesis models. Neglecting IGM absorption, this ratio corresponds to lower limits to the relative (absolute) escape fraction of $f_{esc,rel}^{MD5b}=75\%\pm38\%$ ($f_{esc,abs}^{MD5b}=14\%\pm7\%$). The stellar population fit to MD5b indicates an age of $\lesssim50$Myr, which is in the youngest 10% of the $HST$ sample and the youngest third of typical $z\sim3$ Lyman break galaxies, and may be a contributing factor to its LyC detection. We obtain a revised, contamination-free estimate for the comoving specific ionizing emissivity at $z=2.85$, indicating (with large uncertainties) that star-forming galaxies provide roughly the same contribution as QSOs to the ionizing background at this redshift. Our results show that foreground contamination prevents ground-based LyC studies from obtaining a full understanding of LyC emission from $z\sim3$ star-forming galaxies. Future progress in direct LyC searches is contingent upon the elimination of foreground contaminants through high spatial-resolution observations, and upon acquisition of sufficiently deep LyC imaging to probe ionizing radiation in high-redshift galaxies.

riverkeeper.org
Results of Hudson River water quality tests highlight risk to swimmers from failure to adequately invest in clean water | Riverkeeper
Riverkeeper calls on leaders to continue historic restoration of the Hudson by closing the $800 million funding gap for wastewater, and re-investing in


“As measured against the Environmental Protection Agency’s recommended guidelines for safe swimming:

23% of Hudson River estuary samples failed.

72% of Hudson River tributary samples failed.

48% of New York City-area water access point samples failed.

Nationwide, public beaches failed the same benchmark at a rate of 10%. Sewage discharges from combined sewers, aging sewer infrastructure and failing septics, as well as agricultural and urban runoff are all believed to be contributing to water quality problems documented in this report.

“The Hudson River, and the creeks that feed it, are our beaches. From the Wallkill River to the Sparkill Creek to the boathouses of New York City, people are rallying to the cause of cleaning up our water. On their behalf, we’re challenging elected leaders to reinvest in both clean water infrastructure, and in the enforcement of our environmental laws,” said Dan Shapley, Riverkeeper’s Water Quality Program Manager“