*safety

The gang’s chilling at the malt shop, as per usual. The Mystery Machine sits out front, minding its own business.

Oh noes, the bad guy appears!

He stretches out his spectacularly-long arms.

Ha, joke’s on you, bad guy! Freddy keeps the Mystery Machine locked, like any wise owner of a–

…oh.

I, uh….

Well, then.

…the real villain of this episode isn’t Mr. Hyde after all.

It’s unsafe van security practices.

How to Safely Watch the Aug. 21 Solar Eclipse


On Aug. 21, 2017, a solar eclipse will be visible in North America. Throughout the continent, the Moon will cover part – or all – of the Sun’s super-bright face for part of the day.

Since it’s never safe to look at the partially eclipsed or uneclipsed Sun, everyone who plans to watch the eclipse needs a plan to watch it safely. One of the easiest ways to watch an eclipse is solar viewing glasses – but there are a few things to check to make sure your glasses are safe:

  •  Glasses should have an ISO 12312-2 certification
  • They should also have the manufacturer’s name and address, and you can check if the manufacturer has been verified by the American Astronomical Society
  • Make sure they have no scratches or damage

To use solar viewing glasses, make sure you put them on before looking up at the Sun, and look away before you remove them. Proper solar viewing glasses are extremely dark, and the landscape around you will be totally black when you put them on – all you should see is the Sun (and maybe some types of extremely bright lights if you have them nearby).

Never use solar viewing glasses while looking through a telescope, binoculars, camera viewfinder, or any other optical device. The concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eyes, causing serious injury. But you can use solar viewing glasses on top of your regular eyeglasses, if you use them!

If you don’t have solar viewing glasses, there are still ways to watch, like making your own pinhole projector. You can make a handheld box projector with just a few simple supplies – or simply hold any object with a small hole (like a piece of cardstock with a pinhole, or even a colander) above a piece of paper on the ground to project tiny images of the Sun.

Of course, you can also watch the entire eclipse online with us. Tune into nasa.gov/eclipselive starting at noon ET on Aug. 21! 

For people in the path of totality, there will be a few brief moments when it is safe to look directly at the eclipse. Only once the Moon has completely covered the Sun and there is no light shining through is it safe to look at the eclipse. Make sure you put your eclipse glasses back on or return to indirect viewing before the first flash of sunlight appears around the Moon’s edge.

You can look up the length of the total eclipse in your area to help you set a time for the appropriate length of time. Remember – this only applies to people within the path of totality.

Everyone else will need to use eclipse glasses or indirect viewing throughout the entire eclipse!

Photographing the Eclipse

Whether you’re an amateur photographer or a selfie master, try out these tips for photographing the eclipse.  

#1 — Safety first: Make sure you have the required solar filter to protect your camera.

#2 — Any camera is a good camera, whether it’s a high-end DSLR or a camera phone – a good eye and vision for the image you want to create is most important.

#3 — Look up, down, and all around. As the Moon slips in front of the Sun, the landscape will be bathed in long shadows, creating eerie lighting across the landscape. Light filtering through the overlapping leaves of trees, which creates natural pinholes, will also project mini eclipse replicas on the ground. Everywhere you can point your camera can yield exceptional imagery, so be sure to compose some wide-angle photos that can capture your eclipse experience.

#4 — Practice: Be sure you know the capabilities of your camera before Eclipse Day. Most cameras, and even many camera phones, have adjustable exposures, which can help you darken or lighten your image during the tricky eclipse lighting. Make sure you know how to manually focus the camera for crisp shots.

#5 —Upload your eclipse images to NASA’s Eclipse Flickr Gallery and relive the eclipse through other peoples’ images.

Learn all about the Aug. 21 eclipse at eclipse2017.nasa.gov, and follow @NASASun on Twitter and NASA Sun Science on Facebook for more. Watch the eclipse through the eyes of NASA at nasa.gov/eclipselive starting at 12 PM ET on Aug. 21.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

Solar Eclipse Safety

Shockingly, I haven’t seen one post about this yet. But the solar eclipse is happening right away and I want this solidly spoken:

Do Not Look At The Sun.

The light from the sun is HIGHLY concentrated and you can and will go BLIND if you look at it. From what I have heard, the ONLY way to look at the sun during the eclipse is through #14 or higher welding glasses or specially designed eclipse glasses.

  • Do Not Try To Make Your Own Lenses That Are Not The Proper Welding Transparency or Specially Designed For Viewing The Eclipse

The eclipse can and will ruin your camera lenses as well unless you have a special solar lense in use.

  • Do Not Try To View The Eclipse Through Your Camera Lense, It Will Still Harm Your Eyes

Please do not stare at the sun or even glance up at the eclipse. Don’t be afraid, but please be aware.

Bring Your Animals Inside

The eclipse could harm them as well, although chances are slim they will even notice. If you are able, keep them inside and away from the windows.

Be Safe!

Dangerous Herbs

Listed below are dangerous herbs and herbal combination and explanations as to why they are dangerous. Do not try any of these herbs, orally, on the skin, or in any other way ever (or during pregnancy or nursing, if listed as such).

*Some of the herbs mentioned are safe in small doses are are written as such. Other herbs are toxic in small doses or any amount. This is not a complete list.

Belladonna - Nightshade, bittersweet nightshade is an extremely poisonous herb and is absolutely deadly. It is related to Henbane. Side effects can include dry mouth, enlarged pupils, blurred vision, red dry skin, fever, fast heartbeat, inability to urinate or sweat, hallucinations, spasms, mental problems, convulsions, and coma.

Blue Cohosh - Can cause miscarriages, especially during early pregnancy. This herbs in combination with other herbs has been used as an aborfacient. It works by loosening and relaxing the uterine muscles. This is why it is often suggested as a remedy for pms and menopause.

Black Cohosh -  Can cause miscarriages, especially during early pregnancy. This herbs in combination with other herbs has been used as an aborfacient. It works by loosening and relaxing the uterine muscles. This is why it is often suggested as a remedy for pms and menopause. 

Chaparral - This herb can cause serious liver damage, liver failure, and acute hepatitis. 

Comfrey - Comfrey can be taken in small doses for upset stomach and pms, but using a lot is dangerous. Comfrey contains pyrrolizidine alkaloids, a type of poison that causes liver and kidney failure as well as cancer. They can be absorbed through the skin as well. 

The amount of PAs found in comfrey changes according to the time of harvesting and the age of the plant. The roots have 10 times higher amounts of PAs than the leaves.

Devil’s Claw -  Harpagophytum, means “hook plant” in Greek. Devil’s claw causes additive effects in many medications. It can cause changes in blood pressure as well.

Eucalyptus - Eucalyptus can not be consumed. Taking 3.5 mL of undiluted oil can be fatal. Even applying too much to the skin and absorbing large amounts is dangerous. (Use it very lightly, dilute it, or use a humidifier.) Signs of eucalyptus poisoning might include stomach pain and burning, dizziness, muscle weakness, small eye pupils, feelings of suffocation, and some others. Eucalyptus changes how many medicines break down in the liver.

Foxglove - Poisoning by this herb can cause stomach upset, small eye pupils, blurred vision, strong slow pulse, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, excessive urination, fatigue, muscle weakness and tremors, stupor, confusion, convulsions, abnormal heartbeats, and death. Long-term use of foxglove can lead to symptoms of toxicity, including visual halos, yellow-green vision, and stomach upset.

Golden Seal - This herb is a uterotonic; brain damage (kernicterus) has developed in newborn infants exposed to goldenseal. Do not use goldenseal during pregnancy or breast-feeding.

Hemlock -  Neuromuscular blockage can occur to the point of death if it blocks the respiratory muscles.

Henbane - Side effects include dry mouth, red skin, constipation, overheating, reduced sweating, vision disturbances, increased heart rate, urination problems, drowsiness, restlessness, hallucinations, delirium, manic episodes, and death. Henbane is poisonous and not safe for self-medication.

Kava - In the South Pacific, kava is a popular social drink, similar to alcohol in Western societies. It is used by some to treat anxiety, restlessness, and insomnia, but like many medicines used to treat these types of issues, Kava runs the risk of being too much of a ‘downer - oversedation.’ It can make you unable to operate machinery, fatigued, and worsen depression. Large doses can also effect the liver and cause yellowing of the eyes. Also, some of the dangerous chemicals in kava can pass into breast milk and might hurt a breast-fed infant. Avoid this herb if you have Parkinson’s disease or if you will undergo or have recently undergone anaesthesia as it effects the central nervous system. Alcohol, sedatives, and benzodiazepines interact with downers.

Licorice Root - This tasty herb, when taken in high doses, may cause tiredness, absence of a menstrual period in women, headache, water and sodium retention, and decreased sexual interest and function in men. It may also cause early delivery in pregnant women and miscarriage in early pregnancy. This root has also been seen effecting hormone levels in the body and interacts with oestrogen. It also seems to rid the body or potassium. It can also cause heart failure.

Mistletoe (European) - Can cause chills vomiting, diarrhea, cramping, and other side effects. Short-term, frequent use of European mistletoe might cause liver damage. Lowers blood pressure.

Mugwort - This herb is dangerous in large quantities. Thujone, a ketone and a monoterpene that occurs naturally in two diastereomeric forms:-α-thujone and-β-thujone is present in wormwood Thujones cause a slight high and a feeling of relaxation, which is why it is enjoyed by smokers and drinkers (as a tincture or bitters), can also cause breakdown of muscle, nightmares, seizures, dizziness, confusion, numbness of arms and legs, paralysis, and death. The chemical is also said to be responsible for absinthe’s hallucinogenic effects.

Mugwort might cause a miscarriage because it can start menstruation and also cause the uterus to contract.

Pennyroyal - Pennyroyal has been used as an antificant and can also kill pregnant mothers. Do not use this herb as a method for miscarriage. It can cause irreversible damage to the liver and kidneys, nervous system, brain, and cam cause dizziness, confusion, seizures, and death.

Peony - Peony can cause uterine contractions and is unsafe to use during pregnancy. It also slows blood clotting.

St. John’s Wort - This herb interacts with SSRIs and other types of medications for the treatment of depression. In bipolar, bipolar depression, mania, manic depression, and other related disorders, St. John’s wort can trigger a major upswing or manic episode in patients. This herb also interacts with birth control.

Wormwood - Wormwood one of the main ingredients in the alcoholic beverage, Absinthe. The latin Absinthium comes from the ancient greek word apsínthion, which some claim translates to “Undrinkable”, referencing the herb’s extreme bitter flavor. It is closely related to mugwort, which is toxic in large doses, but wormwood is even more so. The herbs also contained thujones. See Mugwort.

Valerian - This herb, especially the root, can cause oversedation. Alcohol, sedatives, and benzodiazepines interact with downers. Valerian can cause some side effects such as headache, excitability, uneasiness, and even insomnia in some people. A few people feel sluggish in the morning after taking valerian, especially at higher doses. It’s best not to drive or operate dangerous machinery after taking valerian. 

Wintergreen - This type of mint can be dangerous in high doses. Taking wintergreen oil or large amounts of wintergreen leaf can cause ringing in the ears, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, headache, stomach pain, and confusion.

Personal Safety on Campus!

Because I know a lot of my followers will be leaving home and going to college soon I wanted you all to make sure that you pack something you might not of thought about, safety devices. Unfortunately we still live in a shitty world so we should protect ourselves. These are all methods I have used myself and unfortunately I have had to use all of them at some point. Hopefully you will never need to use any of these but I would rather you all be safe.

All these tips are gender neutral because anyone can be assaulted, friends. (Although we all know you’re more likely to be assaulted if you’re a woman or LGBT+ so please consider these)

There are several different ways to make yourself feels safer while walking home late at night. 

  1. I personally carry a knife with me at all times, make sure yours is legal in your state and you can carry it on campus because some campuses have restrictions on spring or size of the blade. Get familiar with it and how it feels. You don’t want the first time you use it to be the time you need it the most.
  2. Pepper spray, tasers, and alarm keychains. I’ve used this one and I recommend it if you don’t have a ton of experience with pepper spray or tasers. Pick what you’re comfortable with. The personal alarm is super easy to use and loud as fuck. Attach it to your keychain when you carry your keys.
  3. General tips
    1. No headphones when walking in low populated or dark areas alone
    2. Stay aware, walk with purpose.
    3. Lots of colleges offer FREE self defense classes, take one and bring your friends with you.
    4. If you’re on campus late at night ask someone from class to walk with you part of the way. No one will tell you “No” for this.
    5. Stay on guard even when you’re in your Uber home.
    6. Never go clubbing alone
  4. Safety apps. There are several. SafeTrek is a popular one!

These are just basic tips and you should further educate yourself on what you can do to stay safe. Just general reminders of things you should get before heading off to college. Stay safe, lovelies!

Crystal Safety, Revisited

There’s an awesome post going around by @prettycitywitch that discusses crystal care and toxicity. I noticed a few errors in it, just due to the source that was used, so I contacted her and got permission to rewrite it to ensure the most accurate information possible is spread around in the witchy community. I’ve gone through every crystal in her list and added a few others. 

Everything in this list has been confirmed by the Gemological Institute of America Laboratory (one of the foremost in gemological research), multiple published mineralogical sources, and/or at least two online mineralogical databases. Crystals of particular concern in each category have been bolded; the other listed crystals have a bit of wiggle room.

Crystals affected by sunlight or heat
Most crystals (including nearly all in this list) are safe to expose to sunlight temporarily - you can wear them in jewelry during the day, for example, but don’t leave them in your windowsill for weeks. In general, colorless crystals may be left in the sun indefinitely, while colored (especially pink) crystals should be stored in a place that doesn’t get direct sun all day. Heat, on the other hand, can easily affect many crystals, but usually only at high temperatures (steam or a jeweler’s torch), so I’ve only included the ones that could be damaged by relatively low temperatures.

  • Amber - may crack in heat
  • Amethyst - may fade over time; safe to expose to sun temporarily
  • Apophyllite - heat can cause flaking; sunlight is fine as long as the specimen is kept cool
  • Maxixe (dark blue beryl) - fades extremely quickly to pale brown in sunlight; color can only be restored through irradiation
  • Azurite - will fade over time with exposure to sunlight; store in a dark, cool environment
  • Celestine - fades in long exposure to sunlight
  • Chrysoprase - may fade in sunlight; restoration of color sometimes possible through prolonged storage in water
  • Fluorite - occasionally can fade in sunlight
  • Hackmanite - exhibits tenebrescence, a temporary change in color due to sun exposure; will return to original color if kept in a dark area
  • Hiddenite - unstable in sunlight and heat to a lesser degree than kunzite; however, some darker green hiddenite is much more unstable than kunzite and great care should be taken, as it can fade in a matter of minutes
  • Kunzite - will fade drastically in sunlight; indoor incandescent light can also slowly affect this stone
  • Larimar - fades over time when exposed to sunlight and heat
  • Morganite - deeper colors or more lilac hues can fade in sunlight
  • Opal - fading is minimal, but sunlight, heat, and changes in air pressure can cause internal fracturing called “crazing”
  • Pearl (& mother-of-pearl) - may lose color or turn dull in sunlight or heat
  • Sulfur - extremely heat-sensitive; crystals may fracture or burst if left in the sun or held in your hand
  • Topaz - irradiated stones may fade in direct sunlight
  • Tugtupite - exhibits tenebrescence, a temporary change in color due to sun exposure; will return to original color if kept in a dark area
  • Vanadinite - may darken and lose transparency in sunlight
  • Zircon - heat-treated stones may revert to original color over time in sunlight; avoid exposure to UV lights (tanning beds, nail salons, etc)

Water-soluble crystals
Though many crystals will eventually be worn away by water mostly due to tiny particles of other substances suspended in the water, there are very few that will dissolve in water in any significant way. Contrary to what some believe, most crystals with the suffix ‘-ite’ aren’t water-soluble; ‘-ite’ simply means ‘stone’ and is part of most mineralogical names. 

  • Anhydrite - not water-soluble, but instead will absorb water and convert to gypsum; store in a dry environment and do not submerge
  • Boji stone - not water-soluble, but may rust due to iron component
  • Calcite - somewhat soluble in slightly acidic water; neutral or slightly alkaline water is usually safe; negligible dissolution in air due to gaseous carbon dioxide
  • Celestine - very slightly soluble
  • Chalcanthite - easily soluble in water, but must be stored in a humid environment
  • Chalcopyrite - not soluble, but may rust due to iron content
  • Fluorite - very slightly soluble
  • Gypsum - somewhat soluble; solubility decreases in warmer water
  • Halite - easily dissolves in water; moisture from your skin or humidity in the air can eat away at crystals
  • Hematite - not water-soluble, but exposed rough areas may rust
  • Magnesite - slightly soluble; solubility increases with presence of salt
  • Magnetite - not water-soluble, but may rust due to iron content
  • Malachite - slightly soluble in water containing carbon dioxide
  • Marcasite - water may trigger decomposition into melanterite, which contains sulfuric acid
  • Mica (muscovite, fuchsite, lepidolite, etc) - plate or sheet-like specimens may absorb water into cleavage planes and begin to break apart; aggregated crystals are safe in water
  • Pyrite - exposure to water, including high-humidity environments, can trigger breakdown
  • Rhodochrosite - slightly soluble in water containing carbon dioxide
  • Selenite - somewhat soluble; solubility decreases in warmer water
  • Sulfur - soluble in warm water; may form sulfuric acid over time if left in a wet or humid environment
  • Ulexite - dissolves in hot water; slightly soluble in cold water

Acid-soluble crystals
A large number of crystals will dissolve in acid. Many only dissolve in strong acids, such as hydrochloric acid - I won’t list those here because it generally won’t be a concern. There is very little information on mineral solubility in weak acids, such as vinegar, so this list is incomplete. But really, why are you soaking any of your crystals in acid?

  • Amber - “young amber” is soluble in a large number of chemicals
  • Aragonite - easily soluble, even in dilute acids; effervesces
  • Atacamite - readily soluble in acids
  • Azurite - may be slightly soluble
  • Calcite - easily soluble; effervesces
  • Lapis lazuli - composed of a number of minerals, including calcite, which may be acid-soluble; acetone and other substances may remove dye
  • Magnesite - slightly soluble in acids
  • Malachite - readily soluble in acids; color may also be affected
  • Pearl (& mother-of-pearl) - soluble in acids; surface will become dull and pitted
  • Rhodochrosite - slightly soluble in warm acids; effervesces
  • Smithsonite - effervesces and dissolves in acids
  • All water-soluble crystals

Crystals affected by salt
Salt is a dehydrator, so any hydrated crystal may be damaged by it. Salt has a hardness of 2 to 2.5 and may scratch any mineral softer than this. It is safe to put non-hydrated crystals of a hardness between 2.5 and 7 in salt, but very fine scratches may occur due to impurities; don’t put cabochons or faceted stones in this hardness range in salt.

  • Apophyllite - may dehydrate in salt, resulting in flaking; usually not an issue unless combined with heat
  • Cavansite - may dehydrate
  • Chalcanthite - dehydrates easily, forming potentially dangerous powder; store in a humid environment
  • Gypsum (including selenite) - hardness of 2; may be scratched by salt; may dehydrate to anhydrite
  • Opal - will dehydrate and develop internal fractures called “crazing”; store in a wet or humid environment
  • Pearl (& mother-of-pearl) - may become dull and pitted
  • Stilbite - may dehydrate

Potentially dangerous crystals

In general, crystals are pretty safe - handling them is usually okay. Many crystals do have somewhat dangerous elements, such as aluminum-bearing garnets, but they’re “locked” in the crystal structure in a way that prevents them from harming us unless the crystal is powdered or dissolved and inhaled/ingested. The occasional garnet or moonstone gem water won’t hurt you in the slightest.

Because there’s no way for this list to be ‘complete’ - I don’t know what unusual stones you might have - I advise you to never make gem waters with or otherwise ingest

  • powdery, very fine, or fibrous crystals;
  • crystals which you have not identified;
  • metal ores;
  • metals, with the exceptions of gold, platinum, tungsten, and titanium; and
  • stones composed of a variety of minerals.

Don’t use these crystals for gem water, elixir, massage oil, etc. Don’t put these crystals in your mouth or otherwise insert them into your body.

  • Adamite - contains arsenic
  • Amazonite - generally safe, but the color is usually caused by traces of lead; don’t use flaky or powdery specimens in gem waters
  • Atacamite - contains copper
  • Aurichalcite - contains copper and zinc
  • Azurite - contains copper
  • Boji stone - composition can vary, so some stones may have dangerous components
  • Brochantite - contains copper
  • Cerussite - ore of lead; wash hands after handling; do not inhale dust
  • Chalcanthite - contains copper; wash hands after handling; do not rub eyes after handling; do not inhale; do not ingest
  • Chalcopyrite - ore of copper
  • Chrysocolla - contains copper
  • Cinnabar - ore of mercury; always wash hands after handling; do not inhale dust; never ingest in any form; do not heat; massive (aggregate) cinnabar can contain elemental mercury which is very easily absorbed by the body
  • Conichalcite - contains copper and arsenic
  • Cuprite - contains copper; do not ingest
  • Dioptase - delicate, may break or crumble into powder; contains copper
  • Eilat stone - contains copper
  • Galena - ore of lead; wash hands after handling; flaky/crumbly specimens are common, be careful not to inhale dust
  • Malachite - contains copper
  • Marcasite - decomposes to melanterite, which contains sulfuric acid; do not ingest; wash hands after handling; do not inhale
  • Mohawkite - contains copper and arsenic; may contain other toxins
  • Psilomelane - contains barium
  • Pyrite - broken-down pyrite can contain sulfuric acid; do not ingest; if pyrite appears blackish or crumbly, wash hands after handling
  • Realgar - contains arsenic; wash hands after handling; never ingest
  • Serpentine (sp. chrysotile) - safe unless fibrous; do not inhale; asbestos
  • Stibnite - very soft; contains antimony
  • Sulfur - can form sulfuric acid when in contact with moisture
  • Turquoise - usually safe unless powdery; contains copper
  • Vanadinite - contains lead; may have traces of arsenic
  • Wulfenite - ore of lead and molybdenum; do not ingest or inhale

A few final safety reminders

⚠️ Never swallow any crystals, because some otherwise safe crystals can interact with your stomach acids and produce dangerous chemicals.

⚠️ Never crush, powder, or dissolve crystals with the intention of inhaling or ingesting them - fine powders and solutions make elements more accessible to the body.

⚠️ Wash your crystals in water and gentle soap before making any gem waters, elixirs, etc. with them. Even if the crystal itself is safe, it may have been in contact with other dangerous crystals or chemicals.

⚠️ Never make gem water, elixirs, etc. with crystals that are on/in matrix (the base rock the crystals grew from). You don’t know what the matrix is composed of, and it may contain dangerous minerals or elements.

⚠️ Never burn, hold in a candle flame, or intentionally heat your crystals. Intentional heating should only be performed by a jewelry or gemstone professional in a controlled environment.
The sole exception to this is anhydrite without matrix, which may be carefully raised to 200°C (~400°F), dry heat, to dehydrate it and change any gypsum components back to anhydrite. Be aware that this process can occasionally result in fractures, breakage, or internal damage to the stone.

Keep yourself and your crystals safe, everyone! There’s no way for this list to be complete, because there are thousands of minerals out there, so please feel free to contact me if you have questions about any particular stones!

Ultimate Hurricane Supplies List

Food

  • Water bottles (if they’re sold out or super expensive, buy a Brita filter and fill up bottles of water at home from the tap)
  • Ramen
  • Granola Bars
  • Protein bars
  • Trail mix
  • Canned soup
  • Chili
  • Tuna fish (or other canned fish)
  • Spam
  • Canned, dried, or packaged fruits
  • Canned vegetables
  • Chef Boyarde 
  • Bread
  • Peanut butter
  • Pet food

Toiletries

  • Medicine 
  • First aid kit
  • Toilet paper
  • Paper towels
  • Deodorant
  • Facial wipes, hand wipes
  • Tampons/pads
  • Bug spray

Entertainment

  • Books
  • Batteries (AA and AAA)
  • Flashlights
  • Portable charger (make sure it’s charged)
  • Matches and lighters
  • Board games
  • Playing cards

Preventative Measures

  • Buy waterproof storage containers and place all important paperwork (social security cards, bank statements, birth certificates, etc) in them.
  • Move any deck chairs, wheelbarrows, swing sets, etc inside to prevent them from becoming a flying boomerang.
  • Brush up your First Aid skills
  • Make yourself a “Bug Out” backpack
    • First aid kit
    • Bottles of water (4)
    • Money
    • Change of clothes
    • Shoes
  • Line windows and doorways with old rags to keep water out
  • Avoid having your car parked underneath trees or power lines
  • Fill larger containers (like your tub) with water to use for flushing toilets if you lose electricity 
  • If it’s cold outside, stock up on firewood or charcoal
  • Stay away from windows
  • If you have a basement, stay out of it
  • Make preparations for your pets, maybe they can stay with family safety outside the hurricane zone
  • If you’re given the order to evacuate, please do!
  • Stay safe!

Additional Resources

Evacuation Locations for Florida

Hurricane Irma

Hurricane Irma Valuables Advice

Some Hurricane Irma Preparations

Tips for Hurricane Irma Safety

Useful Apps for Irma Preppers

Thanks: @holyuniverse, @learngeo, @caitsandahalf, @galaxices, @kendog303, @haydenstudiesblog, and @studywithlexa for the tips! Please send more if you have them.

Hurricane Harvey: What’s Happening & How You Can Help

Resources for those affected and those looking to give.


View this post on our blog to see the embedded tweets.


On behalf of the DoSomething.org staff and our 5.5 million members, we are thinking of everyone affected by Hurricane Harvey and hoping you are safe.

Rescue operations in full swing in Houston as people flee flooding from Tropical Storm Harvey. pic.twitter.com/znCJAJCFQL

— Robert Gauthier (@rgaut999)

August 27, 2017

This man is a preacher checking for people inside cars at 610 & 288 PC Brian Roberson Jr @KPRC2 #Harvey pic.twitter.com/NJx58ZN8N8

— Sara Donchey (@KPRC2Sara)

August 27, 2017

Here is the latest: At least five people are dead, with many more injured and up to 450,000 seeking federal aid, as a result of the hurricane which pummeled southeast Texas over the weekend. With massive damage and dangerous flooding, the people of Houston and surrounding areas need all hands on deck. Here’s how you can find help and how you can help others.

How to Get Help if You’re Affected by the Storm

If you’re in areas hit by the storm, call the US Coast Guard.

Widening #USCG communications for #Harvey rescue ops in #Houston: Call 281-464-(4851)(4852)(4853)(4854)(4855). Get on roofs. Mark locl w/SOS

— U.S. Coast Guard (@uscoastguard)

August 27, 2017


281–464–4851

281–464–4852

281–464–4853

281–464–4854

281–464–4855

You can also visit the City of Houston Emergency site for, among others:

How to Help Those Affected

The orgs below are providing crucial support to those affected. If you have money to give, check out these tips from ProPublica before donating. If you aren’t able to donate, use social media to tell others about these resources.

For more, Vox and The Huffington Post have also compiled resources.


DoSomething.org is the largest tech company exclusively for young people and social change. We’re activating 5.5 million young people (in every US area code and in 131 countries!) to make positive change both online and off.

When one individual inflicts bodily injury upon another such that death results, we call the deed manslaughter; when the assailant knew in advance that the injury would be fatal, we call his deed murder. But when society places hundreds of proletarians in such a position that they inevitably meet a too early and an unnatural death, one which is quite as much a death by violence as that by the sword or bullet; when it deprives thousands of the necessaries of life, places them under conditions in which they cannot live – forces them, through the strong arm of the law, to remain in such conditions until that death ensues which is the inevitable consequence – knows that these thousands of victims must perish, and yet permits these conditions to remain, its deed is murder just as surely as the deed of the single individual; disguised, malicious murder, murder against which none can defend himself, which does not seem what it is, because no man sees the murderer, because the death of the victim seems a natural one, since the offence is more one of omission than of commission. But murder it remains.
—  Engels - Condition of the Working Class in England 1845