*mnd

5

The unintended side effect of the Ice Bucket Challenge is that it’s giving celebrities the opportunity to be cute, entertaining, and perhaps even likeable.

But they can all go home now because Benedict Cumberbatch, a spokesperson for the MND Association (Britain’s ALS organization) has done his video, answering Hiddleston’s challenge, and it is the best of the celebrity videos so far. First, he makes a point of mentioning how to donate, an important step many videos skip, and then he does the challenge five times—once while naked. I’m pretty sure all of Tumblr is in a coma right now.  

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June 2nd 1941: Lou Gehrig dies

On this day in 1941, the famous New York Yankees baseball player Lou Gehrig died aged 37. Nicknamed ‘The Iron Horse’, Gehrig’s 23 Grand Slams remained the most on record until it was broken by fellow Yankees player Alex Rodriguez in 2013. The remarkable career of this exceptionally talented baseball player ended in 1939 when, after his performance had been deteriorating, Gehrig was diagnosed with a terminal neurodegenerative disease which severely limits physical mobility (often to the point of paralysis) while not affecting the brain. The disease is known by different names; in the UK it is called motor neurone disease (MND), and in the US it is  amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The diagnosis led Gehrig to retire aged 36, and on a July 4th 1939 ‘Lou Gehrig Appreciation Day’ at Yankee Stadium, he gave an emotional farewell speech that has become known as ‘baseball’s Gettysburg Address’. Lou Gehrig died two years later, just before his 38th birthday. His legacy continues as one of the greatest players of all time, and in the fact that many Americans now refer to ALS/MND as 'Lou Gehrig’s Disease’. Other notable people to have this disease include Stephen Hawking, whose is an unusual case as he has lived with it for over 50 years.

“Today I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the earth…I might have been given a bad break, but I’ve got an awful lot to live for”
- Lou Gehrig in his 1939 farewell speech