*mg3

Tactics Group MG14Z

MG-14Z - a twin barreled dual feed machinegun based on the MG42/MG3 chassis.

A small yet dynamic company located in the German city of Frankfurt, the Tactics Group GmbH corporation has drawn a lot of attention upon itself during the latest trade shows in Europe, thanks to its P-18 pistols − modern versions of the Austrian Steyr-Mannlicher GB Barnitzke-type gas-brake pistols − and thanks to its fancy modernized variations of the German World War 2-era “Fallschirmjägergewehr” Fg42 rifle.

However, the Tactics Group company is also well introduced in the field of defense manufacturing: it is the sole European distributor of the C-More M26-MASS modular assault shotgun system also used by the United States Army, and cooperated with Rheinmetall to take part to the “Kampwertsteigerung” program, which led to the spawning of the Mg3-KWS 7.62x51mm-NATO modernized general-purposes machinegun for the German Bundeswehr.

That’s why the Tactics Group’s latest and more fancy creation − the MG-14z − might actually have a future: conceived to enhance the firepower of these military units that still issue the Mg3 or other Mg42 variants − including the Italian MG-42/59 or the former Yugoslavian SARAC-53 − the MG-14z is as close as you could get to a double barrel MG.

Only the receivers of two separate MG3s remain in the MG-14z; everything is re-engineered and rebuilt from the ground up: new barrels with ventilated metal shrouds, new feeding ports, new twin feeding systems with downwards ejection, new single pistol grip and trigger, new common chassis.
As the project is currently ongoing, there’s no further information currently available about the MG-14z; the Tactics Group GmbH company however seems to believe in it, going as far as to call it “a low-cost alternative to Miniguns”.

WWII Firearms in Iraq Part 2

Part 1 // Part 3

In the 2003 invasion of Iraq and subsequent occupation by American forces, history wormed its way into the hands of insurgents, who used whatever weapons they could lay hands on to fight the invaders. It was not uncommon to find firearms better suited for the museum than the battlefield.

PPSh-41. The Soviet Union’s primary submachine gun of World War II. With a rate of fire up to 1000 rpm, the PPSh gave Soviet soldiers volumes of firepower that German soldiers couldn’t compete with. Some six million PPSh’s were manufactured by the USSR between 1941-1947, and China made several million more, making the PPSh one of the world’s most produced firearms. No wonder it can be found in most conflicts.

TACTICAL.

With 1000 rpm, you can really saturate a room.

SQUAD UP.

StG-44. The world’s first assault rifle, the Stg-44 was the pinnacle of German firearms technology at the time. The StG-44 had a rocky start, firearms designers forced to call it a submachine gun in order to thwart Hitler, who did not care for the kurz bullet concept and only wanted more SMGs. However, when Hitler finally saw the StG-44 in action (under the guise of MP44) he gave his consent for its full manufacture and christened it the “Sturmgewehr:” storm rifle. Although the StG-44 could not turn the tide of battle, it was the basis for every combat rifle today.

This could be in 1991 or 2003. 

Photographic quality was kind of in a nebulous area around those time periods.

MG42. A true general purpose machine gun, the MG42 was one of the outstanding weapons of the war, with proven reliability, durability, simplicity and ease of manufacture. To this day the MG42 sees service as the MG3, and is virtually unchanged.

MG42 with a M1919, RPK, SG-43 and PPSh.

MP40. Of course.

Wz. 35. If I’m not mistaken, this is THE Wz. 35; a Polish anti-tank rifle that was so secret that until mobilization in 1939, the combat-ready rifles were held in closed crates enigmatically marked: “Do not open! Surveillance equipment!” Unlike other anti-materiel rifles of the time, the Wz. 35 did not use an armor-piercing bullet with a hard core, but rather a lead core, full metal jacket bullet. Due to the high muzzle velocity this was effective even under shallow angles, as instead of ricocheting, the bullet would “stick” to the armor and punch a roughly 20 mm diameter hole.

Less than 10 examples of the Wz. 35 still exist, making this an extremely rare and valuable firearm to both collectors and museums.