*maxine

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#BlackWomenAtWork uncovers the everyday struggles black women face at work

Black women are fed up with the way they are treated in the workplace so they are sharing their experiences on Twitter.

Activist Brittany Packnett kicked off the hashtag #BlackWomenAtWork in response to the disrespectful ways in which two prominent black women were treated by public figures throughout the day. 

As a way to help address these issues, Packnett encouraged black women online to share some of their real-life experiences at work.  

“I wanted the hashtag to make the invisible visible, to challenge non-black people to stand with black women not just when this happens on television, but in the cube right next to them,” she said. “I’m also glad stories of triumph and achievement got shared through the hashtag as well ― black women are more than just our woes, we are triumphant.”

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After attacks on Maxine Waters, April Ryan, black women clap back with #BlackWomenAtWork

  • The #BlackWomenAtWork hashtag was inspired by a tiring day of racist and sexist comments hurled at two successful black woman just trying to do their jobs.
  • At Tuesday’s White House press briefing, during a heated exchange between press secretary Sean Spicer and White House correspondent April Ryan, Spicer admonished Ryan for responding to his comments, telling her “Stop shaking your head again.”

  • Writer and activist Brittany Packnett was moved to action by Tuesday’s events, and on Wednesday evening she tweeted a call to action, urging black women on Twitter to share their “Maxine and April moments” with the hashtag #BlackWomenAtWork. Read more. (3/29/2017 11:30 AM)