*gravity

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Don’t Wait..Take Back the Falls!!

Watch NOW!! Gravity Falls Full Season 2

Gravity Falls (S2E20) : Weirdmageddon 3: Take Back the Falls

Gravity Falls (S2E19) : Weirdmageddon 2: Escape From Reality

Gravity Falls (S2E18) : Weirdmageddon: Pt.1 

Gravity Falls (S2E17) : Dipper and Mabel vs. the Future 

Gravity Falls (S2E16) : Roadside Attraction 

Gravity Falls (S2E15) : The Last Mabelcorn 

Gravity Falls (S2E14) : The Stanchurian Candidate 

Gravity Falls (S2E13) : Dungeons, Dungeons, & More Dungeons 

Gravity Falls (S2E12) : A Tale of Two Stans 

Gravity Falls (S2E11) : Not What He Seems 

Gravity Falls (S2E10) : Northwest Mansion Noir 

Gravity Falls (S2E9) : The Love God 

Gravity Falls (S2E8) : Blendin’s Game 

Gravity Falls (S2E7) : Society of the Blind Eye 

Gravity Falls (S2E6) : Little Gift Shop of Horrors 

Gravity Falls (S2E5) : Soos and the Real Girl 

Gravity Falls (S2E4) : Sock Opera 

Gravity Falls (S2E3) :  The Golf War

Gravity Falls (S2E2) : Into the Bunker 

Gravity Falls (S2E1) : Scary-oke 

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What are Gravitational Waves?

Today, the National Science Foundation (NSF) announced the detection of gravitational waves by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), a pair of ground-based observatories. But…what are gravitational waves? Let us explain:

Gravitational waves are disturbances in space-time, the very fabric of the universe, that travel at the speed of light. The waves are emitted by any mass that is changing speed or direction. The simplest example is a binary system, where a pair of stars or compact objects (like black holes) orbit their common center of mass.

We can think of gravitational effects as curvatures in space-time. Earth’s gravity is constant and produces a static curve in space-time. A gravitational wave is a curvature that moves through space-time much like a water wave moves across the surface of a lake. It is generated only when masses are speeding up, slowing down or changing direction.

Did you know Earth also gives off gravitational waves? Earth orbits the sun, which means its direction is always changing, so it does generate gravitational waves, although extremely weak and faint.

What do we learn from these waves?

Observing gravitational waves would be a huge step forward in our understanding of the evolution of the universe, and how large-scale structures, like galaxies and galaxy clusters, are formed.

Gravitational waves can travel across the universe without being impeded by intervening dust and gas. These waves could also provide information about massive objects, such as black holes, that do not themselves emit light and would be undetectable with traditional telescopes.

Just as we need both ground-based and space-based optical telescopes, we need both kinds of gravitational wave observatories to study different wavelengths. Each type compliments the other.

Ground-based: For optical telescopes, Earth’s atmosphere prevents some wavelengths from reaching the ground and distorts the light that does.

Space-based: Telescopes in space have a clear, steady view. That said, telescopes on the ground can be much larger than anything ever launched into space, so they can capture more light from faint objects.

How does this relate to Einstein’s theory of relativity?

The direct detection of gravitational waves is the last major prediction of Einstein’s theory to be proven. Direct detection of these waves will allow scientists to test specific predictions of the theory under conditions that have not been observed to date, such as in very strong gravitational fields.

In everyday language, “theory” means something different than it does to scientists. For scientists, the word refers to a system of ideas that explains observations and experimental results through independent general principles. Isaac Newton’s theory of gravity has limitations we can measure by, say, long-term observations of the motion of the planet Mercury. Einstein’s relativity theory explains these and other measurements. We recognize that Newton’s theory is incomplete when we make sufficiently sensitive measurements. This is likely also true for relativity, and gravitational waves may help us understand where it becomes incomplete.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

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One hundred years after Albert Einstein predicted the existence of gravitational waves, they have been detected directly.

In a highly anticipated announcement, physicists with LIGO revealed today, on 11 February, that their twin detectors have heard the gravitational ‘ringing’ produced by the collision of two black holes about 1.3 billion light-years from Earth.

This means we now have a new tool for studying the Universe. For example, waves from the Big Bang would tell us a little more about how the universe formed.
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We need more of these gifs.

Seriously. I can’t get enough of how cute they are! Put the Kekkai Sensen ending animation with ANY two main characters in any fandom and BOOM! Amazing gif.

Fandoms that would go great with this (at least what I would like to see):

Star vs. The Forces of Evil, Undertale, literally every anime with a male and female main character, etc…

theguardian.com
Gravitational waves: discovery hailed as breakthrough of the century
Scientists announce discovery of clear gravitational wave signal, ripples in spacetime first predicted by Albert Einstein
By Tim Radford

Physicists have announced the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in spacetime first anticipated by Albert Einstein a century ago.

“We have detected gravitational waves. We did it,” said David Reitze, executive director of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (Ligo), at a press conference in Washington.

The announcement is the climax of a century of speculation, 50 years of trial and error, and 25 years perfecting a set of instruments so sensitive they could identify a distortion in spacetime a thousandth the diameter of one atomic nucleus across a 4km strip of laserbeam and mirror.

The phenomenon was detected by the collision of two black holes. Using the world’s most sophisticated detector, the project scientists listened for 20 thousandths of a second as the two giant black holes, one 35 times the mass of the sun, the other slightly smaller, circled around each other.

At the beginning of the signal, their calculations told them how stars perish: the two objects had begun by circling each other 30 times a second. By the end of the 20 millisecond snatch of data, the two had accelerated to 250 times a second before the final collision and dark merger.

The observation signals the opening of a new window onto the universe.

“This is transformational,” said Professor Alberto Vecchio, of the University of Birmingham, and one of the researchers working on Ligo. “This observation is truly incredible science and marks three milestones for physics: the direct detection of gravitational waves, the first detection of a binary black hole, and the most convincing evidence to date that nature’s black holes are the objects predicted by Einstein’s theory.”

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Re-Watching AToTS and...

I was re-watching A Tale of Two Stans, and I got to this scene, that upon first (second, third, okay and fourth) left me heartbroken. You know the one:

However, after my recent re-watch, I noticed that my kneejerk reaction to this scene had shifted from “Oh, no!” to you “Yes. This is painful, but necessary!”

Like, I’ve suddenly realized what an empowering, important character growth moment this was for Stan.

His brother has just rejected him again. Has arguably given him an eviction notice from not only the Shack but also Stanford’s life. We’ve seen this happen before. It could almost be considered a parallel to this scene from the exact same episode:

But instead of spending the next decade trying to prove his worth as a family member or try to get back into Ford’s good graces, what does Stan do here?

He accepts the rejection. Sadly and regrettably, of course, since Stan obviously wanted to make up with his brother. But here’s the thing: This moment shows that he does not rely on that reconciliation for happiness. And then you have this line:

Stan: “You stay away from the kids; I don’t want them in danger. ‘Cause as far as I’m concerned, they’re the only family I have left.”

I don’t think this is so much Stan not considering Ford his brother anymore, but the narrative asserting that what Stan and Ford have between them now is not a functioning family unit. And Stan knows this because he’s spent the summer with Dipper and Mabel.

In this very same episode, you have Stan revealing all his lies and secrets, and the kids forgive him. They forgive him, and still love him, because forgiveness and unconditional love is part of what makes a family.

Now that I look at it, I'm glad and grateful that this scene was included, even though it hurts.

Obviously, I want these broken old teacups to make up, and so does Stan (and they most likely WILL) but the fact that he outright states that he does not need Ford’s approval or acceptance because he already has these things from other people (the kids, and Soos and Wendy, too) he now considers family is so, so important.