Greek Mythology Dreamcast  → Christina Hendricks as Aphrodite

«Aphrodite (i/æfrəˈdaɪti/ af-rə-dy-tee; Greek: Ἀφροδίτη) is the Greek goddess of love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is also known as Cytherea (Lady of Cythera) and Cypris (Lady of Cyprus) after the two cult sites, Cythera and Cyprus, which claimed to be her place of birth. Myrtle, doves, sparrows, horses, and swans were said to be sacred to her. The ancient Greeks identified her with the Ancient Egyptian goddess Hathor.».

Greek Mythology Dreamcast  → Michael Fassbender as Ares

 «Ares (Ancient Greek: Ἄρης [árɛːs], Μodern Greek: Άρης [ˈaris]), Doric Greek: Ἄρα [ára] was the Greek god of war. He is one of the Twelve Olympians, and the son of Zeus and Hera. He often represents the physical or violent and untamed aspect of war. Ares plays a relatively limited role in Greek mythology as represented in literary narratives, though his numerous love affairs and abundant offspring are often alluded to. When Ares does appear in myths, he typically faces humiliation. He is well known as the lover of Aphrodite, the goddess of love. The symbol of Ares was the spear and his sacred animal was the dog.»


Character Tropes: Basil of Baker Street (The Great Mouse Detective)

Kay, so I saw @konako made a few of these with the Kung Fu Panda characters and I thought it was a great idea. So if it’s cool with you, Konako, now and then I’m probably going to do one with a favorite character of mine. Basically the idea is a GIFset identifying a character and his/her TV Tropes. Aaaand Basil seemed like an obvious good place to start. :D

Greek Mythology Dreamcast  → Felicia Day as Artemis

«Artemis (Greek: (nominative) Ἄρτεμις, (genitive) Ἀρτέμιδος) was often described as the daughter of Zeus and Leto, and the twin sister of Apollo. She was the Hellenic goddess of the hunt, wild animals, wilderness, childbirth, virginity and protector of young girls, bringing and relieving disease in women; she often was depicted as a huntress carrying a bow and arrows. The deer and the cypress were sacred to her.»

Greek Mythology Dreamcast  → Aaron Tveit as Apollo

 «Apollo (Attic, Ionic, and Homeric Greek: Ἀπόλλων, Apollōn (gen.: Ἀπόλλωνος); Doric: Ἀπέλλων, Apellōn; Latin: Apollō) is one of the most important and complex of the Olympian deities in ancient Greek and Roman religion, Greek and Roman mythology, and Greco–Roman Neopaganism. The ideal of the kouros (a beardless, athletic youth), Apollo has been variously recognized as a god of light and the sun, truth and prophecy, healing, plague, music, poetry, and more. Apollo is the son of Zeus and Leto, and has a twin sister, the chaste huntress Artemis. As the leader of the Muses and director of their choir, Apollo functioned as the patron god of music and poetry. Hermes created the lyre for him, and the instrument became a common attribute of Apollo. Often depicted in sculptures and paintings of Apollo are wolves, deer, and swans.»

Greek Mythology Dreamcast  → Eva Green as Athena

«Athena or Athene (pron.: /əˈθiːnə/ or /əˈθiːniː/; Attic: Ἀθηνᾶ, Athēnā or Ἀθηναία, Athēnaia; Epic: Ἀθηναίη, Athēnaiē; Ionic: Ἀθήνη, Athēnē; Doric: Ἀθάνα, Athānā), is the goddess of wisdom, courage, inspiration, civilization, law and justice, just warfare, mathematics, strength, strategy, the arts, crafts, and skill. She is also a shrewd companion of heroes and is the goddess of heroic endeavour. She is the virgin patroness of Athens. Classically, she is portrayed wearing a full- length chiton, and sometimes in armor, with her helmet raised high on the forehead to reveal the image of Nike. Athena often is depicted with an owl sitting on one of her shoulders.»

Greek Mythology Dreamcast  → Matt Smith as Hermes

«Hermes (/ˈhɜrmiːz/; Greek : Ἑρμῆς) was an Olympian god in Greek religion and mythology, son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia. He was second youngest of the Olympian gods. Hermes was a god of transitions and boundaries. He was quick and cunning, and moved freely between the worlds of the mortal and divine, as emissary and messenger of the gods, intercessor between mortals and the divine, and conductor of souls into the afterlife. He was protector and patron of travelers, herdsmen, thieves, orators and wit, literature and poets, athletics and sports, invention and trade. In some myths he is a trickster, and outwits other gods for his own satisfaction or the sake of humankind. His attributes and symbols include the herma, the rooster and the tortoise, purse or pouch, winged sandals, winged cap, and his main symbol was the herald’s staff, the Greek kerykeion or Latin caduceus which consisted of two snakes wrapped around a winged staff.»