*gbu

cnn.com
US drops largest non-nuclear bomb in Afghanistan
The US military has dropped an enormous bomb in Afghanistan, according to four US military officials with direct knowledge of the mission.
By Barbara Starr and Ryan Browne, CNN

The US military has dropped an enormous bomb in Afghanistan, according to four US military officials with direct knowledge of the mission.

A GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast Bomb, nicknamed MOAB, was dropped at 7 p.m. local time Thursday, the sources said.

The MOAB is also known as the “mother of all bombs.” A MOAB is a 21,600-pound, GPS-guided munition that is America’s most powerful non-nuclear bomb.

The bomb was dropped by an MC-130 aircraft, operated by Air Force Special Operations Command, according to the military sources.

They said the target was ISIS tunnels and personnel in the Achin district of the Nangarhar province.

The military is currently assessing the damage. Gen. John Nicholson, commander of US forces in Afghanistan, signed off on the use of the bomb, according to the sources.

This is the first time a MOAB has been used in the battlefield, according to the US officials. This munition was developed during the Iraq War.

Why this Giant Bomb in Afghanistan is weird

So we just dropped a giant fucking bomb in Eastern Afghanistan to fight ISIS.  The bomb in question is the GBU-43, one of the largest non Nuclear bombs the US has and is a 22,000 pound bomb.  The normal weight of a US bomb is 250-2,000 pounds.  The reason why we use smaller bombs is they are more precise, the smaller bomb makes a smaller explosion, which is less likely to harm civilians or non combatants.  More and more the US military style has been in favor of more narrow targets and more specific weapons.  So the GBU-43 is very different, that is a giant fucking bomb that damages a whole area.  It is the second largest non nuclear bomb the US has in stock, which would be the GBU-57, which weighs 30,000 pounds.  The GBU-57 is designed to destroy massively fortified bunker complexes, so if the enemies are in a fortress, we could level it.  Now we have never used the 57, because our enemies aren’t stupid enough to build a giant fortress and wait for us to bomb them, they know full well how great our air power is, and so they spread out to avoid being hit.  The GBU-43 is has greater spread than the GBU-57 and is designed to destroy not bunkers or cave complexes, but to spread a large explosion in a specific region, like if you wanted to blow up a large part of a city or destroy a bunch of small defenses over a wide area.  It comes from the 15,000 pound BLU-82 bomb used in the Vietnam War to blow up dense areas of jungle that could then be used for landing. The spread is a mile wide Source  

  The Way the Bomb works is that it explodes and pretty much everything is a giant massive crater, like if 11 tons of TNT was blow up at once.  This bomb is so heavy that it requires a special type of plane, a parachute, and an elaborate organization system to even drop the damn thing.  We considered using this particular Bomb in 2003 but thought better of it.  

   lets talk about Afghanistan for a moment.   ISIS in Afghanistan has been on a steady retreat, between the 8500 US Forces, the 7,000 NATO forces and the who knows how many Afghan Forces, ISIS has been reduced to roughly 800 troops guarding two provinces.  ISIS is also battling the Taliban, no ally to the US and struggling with local warlords and bandit groups.  So we have been steadily winning in Afghanistan at least in the short term goal of defeating ISIS (the long term goal we still haven’t figured out) as things were.  As always, the tough Afghanistan terrain combined with the use of roadside bombs, tunnels, and well trained insurgents is extremely difficult to deal with.  The US has had some recent problems because it was thought we were going to leave in a few months from today, now it looks like we are going to be here for…who knows how long.  In fighting ISIS btw, the Taliban has been able to gain more and more power.   So does the GBU-43 help us win? Why did we drop a giant fucking bomb? 

    It doesn’t look like it, I mean if dropping a really big bomb is what it would take to defeat ISIS….why hadn’t we done that before?  We have been in Afghanistan since 2001, the bomb was built in 2003, if using it would scare terrorists into surrendering…why didn’t we use it earlier.

  One of the main issues with bombs is that we often blow up things we didn’t intend too.  Only yesterday, we accidentally killed 18 of our Syrian Allies fighting ISIS which is turning into a huge PR nightmare.  The Bomb isn’t designed for the type of fighting we are doing in Afghanistan at the moment, at least that isn’t what I have lead to believe.  If it is designed for that type of fighting….why haven’t we used i before?  In fact if the bomb killed civilians, which the Military is telling us isn’t true but I am skeptical, this would hurt our efforts in the region, since it buys into the exact type of behavior that helps ISIS recruit new people to fight us.  

  It kinda seems like this is a PR stunt, and that worries me.  Trump’s approval ratings are extremely low and a giant fucking bomb might help make him look good, or at least make him think he is looking good.  In many ways this reminds me of the airstrike on Assad, which regardless of whether we should or should not attack Assad, this particular airstrike didn’t do much of anything. The bomb seems to be the same, maybe using giant fuck off bombs might help stabilize the region, but it looks like we just dropped it so we could brag about the giant fucking bomb we just dropped.  Because the mainstream media likes bombs, you can show them on TV and get ratings, so I think Trump is trying to get popularity by doing macho military things like dropping giant bombs so we can feel like we made progress.

   Maybe this is to intimidate China and North Korea which I doubt will work, China knows we won’t ever go to war with them (and visa Versa).

   Or maybe Trump thinks we can scare ISIS into going home.


 Honestly this seems more like optics than a long term strategy, but I”m going to wait and see how things turn out

2

>celebrities in charge of making educated statements

The Blast Yield of Little Boy (Detonated in Hiroshima) was 15 kilotons (That’s 15,000 Tons) of TNT.

The Blast Yield of Fat Man (Detonated in Nagasaki) was 21 kilotons (That’s 21,000 Tons) of TNT.

The Blast Yield of the GBU-43 is 11 Tons of TNT.

independent.co.uk
US drops 'biggest non-nuclear bomb it has' on Afghanistan
US has dropped what has been described as the largest non-nuclear bomb in the country’s arsenal on an area of eastern Afghanistan

The Pentagon said the strike was the first time the 21,000lb weapon had been used in combat operations.

A spokesperson for the US Department of Defence confirmed to The Independent that a MC-130 aircraft dropped a GBU-43 bomb at 7pm local time.

The weapon is known in the US Air Force by its nickname MOAB, or “mother of all bombs”. MOAB stands for massive ordinance air blast.

The World According to Trump

The starkest difference between dictatorships and democracies is that democracies are ruled by laws, and dictatorships are ruled by dictators.

The “rule of law,” as it’s often referred to, stands for laws that emerge from a process responsive to the majority, that are consistently applied, and are applicable to everyone regardless of their position or power.

Donald Trump doesn’t seem to understand this. Within a matter of days, Trump has bombed Syria and a group of fighters in eastern Afghanistan.

On April 12, Trump authorized the Pentagon to drop a 22,000-pound GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast Bomb (MOAB) on people described as “Islamic State forces” in eastern Afghanistan near the Pakistani border.

It’s the first time this bomb – nicknamed the “mother of all bombs,” and the largest air-dropped munition in the U.S. military’s inventory – has ever been used in a combat.

It’s the largest explosive device America has utilized since dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in World War II. (By comparison, U.S. aircraft commonly drop bombs that weigh between 250 to 2,000 pounds.)

Why, exactly? It’s not clear. And what was Trump’s authority to do this? Even less clear.

We still don’t know exactly why Trump bombed Syria. He said it was because Syria’s president, Bashar al-Assad, used chemical weapons on innocent civilians, including children.

But it wasn’t the first time Assad had used chemical weapons. When he did in 2013, Trump counseled against bombing Syria in response.

And where did Trump get the authority to bomb Syria? Assad is a vicious dictator who does terrible things to his people. But U.S. law doesn’t authorize presidents to go to war against vicious dictators who do terrible things to their people.

The Constitution leaves it up to Congress, not the president, to declare war.

In 2014, President Barack Obama began hostilities against the Islamic State, arguing that Congress’s approval of George W. Bush’s wars against Afghanistan in 2001 and Iraq in 2002 provided him sufficient to authority.

Well, maybe. But there’s no way Trump can rely on Congress’s approval of these wars to bomb Syria.

And it’s a stretch to argue that a group claiming or alleged to be connected to ISIS, but located in eastern Afghanistan far away from where ISIS is attempting to establish an Islamic State, is the same as the Islamic State.

In a democracy, the rule of law means that we the people are supposed to be in charge, through our elected representatives in Congress.

It can be a heavy responsibility. It is especially weighty when it comes to warfare, to the destruction and annihilation of human beings.

As Commander-in-Chief, a president is empowered to manage the military might of the nation. But he is not empowered to initiate warfare on his own. That’s our job. 

The world according to Trump is becoming increasingly dangerous, in part because we are not doing our job. 

8

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (1966) » Tuco

You never had a rope around your neck. Well, I’m going to tell you something. When that rope starts to pull tight, you can feel the devil bite your ass.

5

Photo series #7

This photo series will bring a well known fighter jet, the fifth generation, twin engine, air superiority, stealth fighter, the Lockheed Martin F-22A Raptor.

Developed from the YF-22, the USAFs ATF (Advanced Tactical Fighter) program winner, the Raptor is one of the most modern fighter jets in the world, although it was primarily designed for air superiority and as a replacement for the F-15, it also has ground attack, eletronic warfare and SIGINT (Signal Intelligence) capabilities.

Because of a series of high costs and lack of missions for it’s intended role, production has ended in 2011 and the last F-22 was delivered in 2012.

The first combat sortie of this fighter jet happened in September 22nd, 2014 when F-22s dropped 1000lb GPS guided bombs on Islamic State targets, in June 2015, it performed the first CAS (Close Air Support) of the aircraft. Although combat sorties are still somewhat slim, the F-22 has had an increase number of missions for ISR ( intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance) gathering during it deployment to the Middle East.

Here are some of it’s specifications:

Engines: Pratt & Whitney F119-PW-100 turbofans with thrust vectoring in the pitch axis (up and down)

Weapons:

 1 x 20mm  M61A2 Vulcan

For AA (Air to Air) missions:

6 x AIM-120 AMRAAM

2 x AIM-9 Sidewinder

For AG (Air to Ground) missions:

2 x 1000lb JDAM or 8 x 250lb GBU-39 Small Diameter Bombs

2 x AIM-9 Sidewinder

2 x AIM-120 AMRAAM

It also has 4 under-wing pylons for drop tanks or weapons with a capacity of 5000lb.

Now of all of this is controlled by an AN/APG-77 radar with an AN/AAR-56 Missile Launch Detector, AN/ALR-94 Radar Warning Receiver (RWR) and a MJU-39/40 flare countermeasures.

And that’s it for this photo series, don’t forget to like, reblog and follow, there is a new photo series every wednesday and sunday.

If you have any suggestions, contributions or want to send a complete photo series, don’t be shy, send them to me and i’ll upload them!

Ripper Street was probably sold to BBC America execs as filling the gap between the Sherlock, and HBO’s Boardwalk Empire.  The phrases, “gritty, historical underworld drama” and “deductive reasoning” were bandied about I’m sure.  But look at me being all cynical when this program has given me the twin gifts of Mathew Macfadyen and tweed.  On with the GBU!

The Good:

Oh Matthew, how wonderful it is to have you on the TV again.  I didn’t quite realize how much I missed you, even though Spooks was the never the same without you, sir.  And here you are with your hang dog look and sensitive/bully personality and lots of mysterious and not-so mysterious pain.  Reid’s wife is the only woman who isn’t a prostitute in this episode and she bears a look of concern combined with disapproval familiar to Spooks fans, as all Tom Quinn’s girlfriends had that same look. 

I swear to God, I’m going to stop comparing this show to Spooks, but I really like how the Ripper Street is post-Jack the Ripper, in the same way that Spooks was post-911.  It’s all about reacting to a Big Event What Changes Everything.  At first I was a bit disappointed because I expected a Twin Peaks style dissection (forgive me!) of the Ripper murders with the sensitive lead detective ultimately failing to bring home his man.  Once I got over the fact that this was all going to be post –Ripper (and yes, I did know off the top of my head roughly when the murders occurred because I was kind of obsessed with it when I was like 12 or something…) and that our DCI Reid was going to be in a state of PTSD the whole time, I was a happy camper.  And that was BEFORE I even got to Captain Jackson.

Adam Rothenberg, an American from New Jersey with a suspicious southern accent, plays Captain Jackson, who nears I can tell is going to be the Holmes figure in all this since he makes brilliant deductions based on medical evidence and spends a lot of time flirting with Reid.  GLORIOUS.  He also has a strained relationship with his significant other, who runs a brothel.  The whole thing is like some kind of weird AU Gone with the Wind fan fic where Rhett and Belle Watley travel around the world solving crimes and setting up brothels in major cities. 

Ripper Street looks amazing.  The sets are wonderful.  Without over using the word gritty, one can actually almost smell the vile cells in Reid’s nick.  There is a palpable sense of evil in some of the back alleys and grotty little nooks where criminals lurk.  No surprise to me, a great deal of it was filmed in Dublin, your best bet for recreating the grime of Victorian London. 

I’m already kind of in love with the Brown Bear pub: the Union Jack bunting (practically the only saturated color that isn’t blood in the whole first episode), the be-muttoned-chopped clientele and the smokey masculinity of the place. 

Of course there’s the tweed as well.  Guy Ritchie’s tweedy Holmes movies have nothing on Ripper Street.  Matthew Macfadyen is Matthew MacPADDIN (see what I did there?) with a three piece tweed suit and a tweed top coat. 

The Bad:

There’s quite a bit of sloppy writing in this thing.  There’s only one criminal in London and he runs both bare knuckle boxing and a pornography ring.  There’s only one photographer as well and apparently one brothel.  Everything dovetails together a bit too neatly to save on sets and characters.  Then there’s the problem that almost all the women are prostitutes.  There are complex relationships and characters under all those corsets, but at the end of the day, the women are all whores and/or crime victims. 

Still the first episode is fairly tightly written and there is a lovely plot device involving inventing the movie camera a few years early for the purpose of this show.  Reid has a great moment when he recognizes the significance of the camera just before it’s destroyed.  He winds up with a strip of film of a dove flying which he keeps because he’s just that kind of sensitive guy who looks at films of birds and stuff. 

The Ugly:

Self-emolation.  Suicide by steak knife. I expected this thing to be bloody, but I’d say the gore needs to be cut down by about 30%.  We should also be subjected to only one Victorian autopsy per episode.  The nudity is fairly gratuitous as well.    There are more boobs in one hour of Ripper street than an entire season of Badda Bing stripper backgrounds on the Sopranos.  Maybe now that they’ve done a lot of boobs, they will tone it down.  I don’t know. 

 Ripper Street is all-around a winner.  I know I’ll be sticking with it, enjoying my twin gifts as it were.

cnn.com
US drops largest non-nuclear bomb in Afghanistan
The US military has dropped an enormous bomb in Afghanistan, according to four US military officials with direct knowledge of the mission.
By Barbara Starr and Ryan Browne, CNN

A GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast Bomb, nicknamed MOAB, was dropped at 7 p.m. local time Thursday, the sources said.

The MOAB is also known as the “mother of all bombs.” A MOAB is a 21,600-pound, GPS-guided munition that is America’s most powerful non-nuclear bomb.

(cont.)

Countdown to some Trump press conference or statement or – let’s be honest – Tweet where he says we’ve been sitting on this bomb for 15 years and he’s the first leader with the balls to use it or something. Anything he can do to paint himself as a strongman willing to do what no other President has done so he can bump up his approval ratings in a bloodthirsty republic.

A little bit of background on this bomb though.

It was first tested back in 2003 and it’s the most powerful non-nuclear weapon in the world, allegedly. Russia says they have a bomb that’s four times stronger, but its existence hasn’t been confirmed by anyone outside of Russia. Either way, the US had about 15 of these but they’d only been detonated in test sites. This is actually the first time we’ve tried to drop it on people in a war zone and we did it to knock out ISIS tunnels and caves in that area. We’ll see how effective that was once the details come out, but I suspect another ploy from this administration to make Trump look like a powerful commander in chief.