*fdc

Goodbye dolls😩

I will most likely be selling off my collection in the near future. I have pretty much everything from FdC and earlier, with a few exceptions. Off the bat I have no spectras(I’m not a fan of ghosts) and the only haunted doll I have is river. Ask away if you’re looking for something. I also have quite a few of the original ever after high dolls(wave one) and a whole bunch of extra clothes and playsets. I have the first set of the vinyls, including comic con nefera. I also have webarella, manny & iris comic con exclusives in and out of box. Valentine and Whisp are out of box but I have the box. I have quite a few dolls in box and all out of box dolls have only been displayed. Smoke/pet free home.

I have a bunch of pics on my old MH Instagram @scarysunny

If you know anybody that’s looking for something, send them my way. Thanks!

Dolls I can't believe I don't have yet:

Gooliope.
FdC Frankie, Toralei & Jinafire
& Twyla & Clawdeen.

Haunted Twyla, Draculaura & Rochelle (I gave up on her)

Vinyl Skelita (I cry)
Big Clawdeen & Elissabat

Moucedes.
BY Catty Noir

The Garrot & Rochelle pack
The So MO & Ghoulia pack

The exercise ones??

I also don’t have the Frankie Fusion doll or Save Frankie anyone and that worries me :/

Uganda elections 2016: Opposition against Museveni grows as Ugandan exiles protest in London

As Uganda prepares to go to the polls, opposition against the country’s president, Yoweri Museveni, has been growing steadily.

Museveni, who has ruled Uganda for nearly 30 years, is widely expected to be elected to another five-year term – his fifth – but just days before the 18 February general election, memories of previous election-related violence have emerged across the country and abroad. The 2011 polls were held in an extremely bitter atmosphere, and followed by an unprecedented campaign of Walk-to-Work protests, riots in different cities and live bullets beingused against demonstrators.

Around a dozen Ugandan exiles, all UK residents, stood outside Uganda House, home of the Ugandan embassy in London, on 8 February, to call for voters to choose either of Museveni’s two opponents. These are Dr Kizza Besigye – leader of opposition party Forum for Democratic Change (FDC) – and John Patrick Amama Mbabazi, a former prime minister and former ruling National Resistance Movement (NRM) party secretary general, who will be running under the GoForward banner.

A new democratic ‘roadmap’ for Uganda

“Uganda’s problem is 30 years overdue. We want to tell the world Ugandans are tired. They don’t want Museveni,” Richard Okwon, a political activist for Uganda Transformation Union, told IBTimes UK.

Okwon, whose organisation was set up in August 2015 to “restructure and reboot the now dysfunctional democracy in Uganda”, claimed Besigye and Amama Mbabazi were the “best alternatives for peace in Uganda”.

“Let them come into the system and the rest of the Ugandans will make a new roadmap for Uganda, with a new constitution accepting ourselves and reconciling ourselves,” he said, citing the example of Uganda’s ethnic northern war led by the Lord Resistance Army (LRA) for the rights of the region’s Acholi people, against perceived discrimination by the government.

'Rigged’ elections amid intimidations

While the preparations are under way in Kampala, Okwon highlighted claims of “rigged” elections amid growing concern about intimidations, including the alleged killing of one of Amama Mbabazi’s security officer,“crime preventer” militias and attacks on journalists and NGO workers.

“These are intimidations to scare people off. The electoral commission should have updated the registry, but they didn’t – it’s the military that did it. And the trick we know from past records, they will put your name in the wrong polling station, so by the time you go for the voting, your name is not there; you go to the second one, your name is not there again, so people give up and just go home,” Okwon said.

In the activists’ view, it will be up to Ugandans to decide for the fate of their nation, as he believes the African Union (“a dog without teeth that can bark but have no influence”) might only stand and watch if electoral violence were to occur, as it has in Burundi.

“My appeal to the militias is they should understand the blood trail of Museveni. My concern is Ugandans are upset and it may flare up. That is my greatest concern. So I would appeal to [Museveni’s] great supporters to peacefully let Uganda transcend this period and have a new roadmap for Uganda, agreed by all corners of Uganda.”

It is believed Uganda has the largest East African community in the UK, where around 100,000 Ugandan British live.

Check out our Flipboard magazine – Uganda Up Close by IBTimes UK

In this series on Uganda, IBTimes UK takes a closer look at the major issues at stake, as some 15 million Ugandans prepare to head to national elections on 18 February.

Related Articles

i’m still so mad that i never got my hands on bloom and gloom cleo >: ( it seems her and jinafire just came and went in the span of like two months?? and yet the FDC exclusive twyla and clawdeens are STILL at target??

like my dad doesn’t like spending money at target so i can rarely go there in the first place, and then when everybody else was finding her on sale, she still rang up as fill price for me. and then weeks later when they had another clearance sale my target didnt have her >: ((

9

This week I’ve been makin myself a new pair of yoga socks!

No pattern, I just did a fdc row of 37 stitches and dc back n forth. Made them both flat and then sewed up the foot bit and the ankle bit, then added ribbed cuffs to the ankle bit and toe bit.

Nice and soft and comfy! Also more stretch than my old pair which is nice.

youtube

Jakarta Dancer

Jakarta Dancer FDC Dance Musical Indonesia In the PUB Dance Concept Modern Dance Jakarta Indonesia Gedung Kesenian Jakarta…

Uganda elections 2016: 'I am not a fanatic of presidency' claims President Museveni

President Yoweri Museveni has defended his decades-long tenure as Uganda’s head of state, by saying he is “not a fan of presidency” and is wealthy enough not to need to be in power to survive.

Political tensions are running high as 15 million Ugandans prepare to head to national elections on 18 February, in which Museveni, who has ruled Uganda for 30 years, will be competing to win his fifth term in office.

Facing Museveni in the upcoming general elections are Dr Kizza Besigye – leader of opposition party Forum for Democratic Change (FDC) – and Amama Mbabazi, a former prime minister and founder of Museveni’s National Resistance Movement (NRM) party, who is running under the GoForward banner after failing to win the NRM nomination from Museveni. (See more: Who are the main candidates running for president?).

On Tuesday (9 February), Museveni appeared on Buganda Kingdom-owned radio station, Central Broadcasting Services (CBS), where he outlined his intentions to extend his 30-year presidency for another five years, claiming he was “not a fanatic of presidency”.

‘Establish the East Africa Federation’

Museveni added he would only step down once a single sovereign state of East Africa is created to “protect blacks” and help them survive against “superpowers” Britain, China and India.

Outlining his desire to help East African nations – including Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania, as well as Uganda – achieve a federation, he said: “I am here to see whether we can help you get the East African Federation so that we have a critical mass of strength that can guarantee your future, our future and our children’s future. But not talking about presidency.”

A previous federation, the East African Community, collapsed in 1977, but was revived in 1999 when a treaty for its re-establishment was signed. The five states have since expressed support for the union, but negotiations continue on issues such as member sovereignty and the timing of its implementation.

“The other time, we almost succeeded in forming the East African Federation, Mzee Moi (Kenya’s president from 1978 to 2002) was committed, Mzee Kibaki (Moi’s successor, from 2002 to 2013) was committed, Uhuru (Kenyatta, Kenya’s president since 2013) is committed. We have been having some issues with Tanzanians but even (former president Jakaya) Kikwete had agreed that we move. This is the number-one target that we should aim at,” Museveni added.

The East African Federation would be the fourth-largest nation in Africa in terms of size and seventeenth largest in the world. At an estimated 153 million people, it would be the second-most populous African country, after Nigeria, and tenth in the world.

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CARNEVALE DI ACIREALE 2016 le dichiarazioni del presidente della FdC Antonio Coniglio e del sindaco Roberto Barbagallo

L’edizione invernale del Più bel Carnevale di Sicilia si è conclusa, ecco le dichiarazioni del presidente della Fondazione del Carnevale di Acireale Antonio Coniglio e del sindaco di Acireale Roberto Barbagallo

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Antonio Coniglio (Presidente FdC): “Abbiamo fatto sold out, questo Carnevale ci ha emozionato, ha registrato grande partecipazione popolare, non solo in termini numerici, ma abbiamo visto le famiglie, i giovani divertiti, felici di stare in piazza e partecipi del clima festoso. E’ stato un grande Carnevale il tempo ci ha accompagnati e l’organizzazione è stata impeccabile. Oggi è un gran finale che ci lascia davvero soddisfatti e ci carica in vista della grande parata dei fiori il 23 il 24 e il 25 aprile, consapevoli del grande tesoro che Acireale possiede, il talento unico dei suoi artigiani, tanto di quelli dei fiori, che avranno il loro meritato spazio in primavera, quanto dei maestri della cartapesta a cui abbiamo voluto assegnare un simbolico riconoscimento in un anno di comune sacrificio. Una menzione particolare non poteva non andare ai cavalieri Camillo Ardizzone, Rosario Lizzio e a Giovanni Messina, che hanno fatto e visto la storia del nostro Carnevale”.

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Roberto Barbagallo (sindaco di Acireale): “E’ stato l’anno del rischio, delle scelte importanti e ne siamo fieri. Dovevamo evitare che accadesse ciò che è successo ad altri Carnevali. Il Carnevale non andava fermato, ma Cittadella era in condizioni critiche, abbiamo trovato una soluzione che ha funzionato, perché il grande pubblico conosce il valore di questa grande manifestazione e abbiamo già pronto il bando per la rifunzionalizzazione della Cittadella, che a breve sarà pubblicato. Destineremo buona parte delle risorse al luogo che è l’anima del Carnevale di Acireale, che non esisterebbe e non sarebbe tra i più belli d’Italia, e non solo, senza i suoi maestri della cartapesta. Questa edizione ci carica e ci fa comprendere che si deve pensare al futuro della manifestazione, che può davvero essere il fulcro della nostra offerta turistica. Affinché il Carnevale, fortemente legato all’identità e alla storia della nostra città, abbia un futuro e diventi internazionale, dobbiamo partire dalla dignità dei nostri maestri della cartapesta, che potranno lavorare ai carri della prossima edizione finalmente in un luogo sicuro e accogliente. Con l’assessorato regionale al Turismo, l’assessore Barbagallo si è detto disponibile in conferenza stampa, porteremo avanti il progetto che prevede la vera trasformazione della Cittadella e del nostro Carnevale, con la creazione del museo, del laboratorio e delle botteghe della cartapesta, aperti e attivi 365 giorni l’anno”.

CARNEVALE DI ACIREALE 2016 le dichiarazioni del presidente della FdC Antonio Coniglio e del sindaco Roberto Barbagallo was originally published on Fancity Acireale

Uganda elections 2016: Opposition against Museveni grows as Ugandan exiles protest in London

As Uganda prepares to go to the polls, opposition against the country’s president, Yoweri Museveni, has been growing steadily.

Museveni, who has ruled Uganda for nearly 30 years, is widely expected to be elected to another five-year term – his fifth – but just days before the 18 February general election, memories of previous election-related violence have emerged across the country and abroad. The 2011 polls were held in an extremely bitter atmosphere, and followed by an unprecedented campaign of Walk-to-Work protests, riots in different cities and live bullets beingused against demonstrators.

Around a dozen Ugandan exiles, all UK residents, stood outside Uganda House, home of the Ugandan embassy in London, on 8 February, to call for voters to choose either of Museveni’s two opponents. These are Dr Kizza Besigye – leader of opposition party Forum for Democratic Change (FDC) – and John Patrick Amama Mbabazi, a former prime minister and former ruling National Resistance Movement (NRM) party secretary general, who will be running under the GoForward banner.

A new democratic ‘roadmap’ for Uganda

“Uganda’s problem is 30 years overdue. We want to tell the world Ugandans are tired. They don’t want Museveni,” Richard Okwon, a political activist for Uganda Transformation Union, told IBTimes UK.

Okwon, whose organisation was set up in August 2015 to “restructure and reboot the now dysfunctional democracy in Uganda”, claimed Besigye and Amama Mbabazi were the “best alternatives for peace in Uganda”.

“Let them come into the system and the rest of the Ugandans will make a new roadmap for Uganda, with a new constitution accepting ourselves and reconciling ourselves,” he said, citing the example of Uganda’s ethnic northern war led by the Lord Resistance Army (LRA) for the rights of the region’s Acholi people, against perceived discrimination by the government.

'Rigged’ elections amid intimidations

While the preparations are under way in Kampala, Okwon highlighted claims of “rigged” elections amid growing concern about intimidations, including the alleged killing of one of Amama Mbabazi’s security officer,“crime preventer” militias and attacks on journalists and NGO workers.

“These are intimidations to scare people off. The electoral commission should have updated the registry, but they didn’t – it’s the military that did it. And the trick we know from past records, they will put your name in the wrong polling station, so by the time you go for the voting, your name is not there; you go to the second one, your name is not there again, so people give up and just go home,” Okwon said.

In the activists’ view, it will be up to Ugandans to decide for the fate of their nation, as he believes the African Union (“a dog without teeth that can bark but have no influence”) might only stand and watch if electoral violence were to occur, as it has in Burundi.

“My appeal to the militias is they should understand the blood trail of Museveni. My concern is Ugandans are upset and it may flare up. That is my greatest concern. So I would appeal to [Museveni’s] great supporters to peacefully let Uganda transcend this period and have a new roadmap for Uganda, agreed by all corners of Uganda.”

It is believed Uganda has the largest East African community in the UK, where around 100,000 Ugandan British live.

Check out our Flipboard magazine – Uganda Up Close by IBTimes UK

In this series on Uganda, IBTimes UK takes a closer look at the major issues at stake, as some 15 million Ugandans prepare to head to national elections on 18 February.

Related Articles