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Shailene Woodley went on The Late Show to talk about how we can keep up the fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline

“The front lines don’t necessarily have to be in North Dakota,” she explained. “The front lines can be wherever you are. You can create a protest in New York City, because protests are about awareness and about people coming together.” She also had some comments about the one thing she wished she’d known when she was taking her now-famous mug shot.

Gifs: The Late Show

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Canon de 27cm Mle 1870

Used in battleships and coast defenses c.1870~1918.
274mm caliber 216kg shells, 434m/s muzzle velocity giving it an estimated 300mm of penetration in wrought iron armor at combat range, breech-loading single shot.

Picture taken c.1885 by Gustave Bourgain onboard a Colbert-class French ironclad, below the center battery.

Note the boarding weapons on racks on the left side of the picture, including cutlasses and Lefaucheux Mle1858 revolvers. The Colbert-class ironclads were also armed with, beside a variety of other naval guns, more than a dozen Hotchkiss 37mm revolving cannons, four 356mm torpedo tubes and a ram.

I’m a very lonely person. I do get lonely sometimes… I’m not depressed, I’m not sad, but I think to be a human being is to be alone. I mean, I have an awareness of my inability at times to connect with other people because I can’t say exactly what I mean. You can’t directly connect. The inability to fully love another person is a form of loneliness. I don’t know how to fully love another person because there is always some part of me that I’m not sharing. There’s always some part of me that I don’t know how to open up and give to another person. Even the people I love most in the world.
—  Stephen Colbert
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Colbert has to correct audience for cheering wrong opinion

Clearly all well-informed individuals, absolutely not brainwashed parrots trained to agree with whatever the Designated Good Guys say.

He was tracing an arc on the table with his fingers and speaking with such deliberation and care. “I was left alone a lot after Dad and the boys died…. And it was just me and Mom for a long time,” he said. “And by her example am I not bitter. By her example. She was not. Broken, yes. Bitter, no.” Maybe, he said, she had to be that for him. He has said this before—that even in those days of unremitting grief, she drew on her faith that the only way to not be swallowed by sorrow, to in fact recognize that our sorrow is inseparable from our joy, is to always understand our suffering, ourselves, in the light of eternity. What is this in the light of eternity? Imagine being a parent so filled with your own pain, and yet still being able to pass that on to your son.
“It was a very healthy reciprocal acceptance of suffering,” he said. “Which does not mean being defeated by suffering. Acceptance is not defeat. Acceptance is just awareness.” He smiled in anticipation of the callback: “ ‘You gotta learn to love the bomb,’ ” he said. “Boy, did I have a bomb when I was 10. That was quite an explosion. And I learned to love it. So that’s why. Maybe, I don’t know. That might be why you don’t see me as someone angry and working out my demons onstage. It’s that I love the thing that I most wish had not happened.” I love the thing that I most wish had not happened. I asked him if he could help me understand that better, and he described a letter from Tolkien in response to a priest who had questioned whether Tolkien’s mythos was sufficiently doctrinaire, since it treated death not as a punishment for the sin of the fall but as a gift. “Tolkien says, in a letter back: ‘What punishments of God are not gifts?’ ” Colbert knocked his knuckles on the table. “ ‘What punishments of God are not gifts?’ ” he said again. His eyes were filled with tears. “So it would be ungrateful not to take everything with gratitude. It doesn’t mean you want it. I can hold both of those ideas in my head.”He was 35, he said, before he could really feel the truth of that. He was walking down the street, and it “stopped me dead. I went, ‘Oh, I’m grateful. Oh, I feel terrible.’ I felt so guilty to be grateful. But I knew it was true. “It’s not the same thing as wanting it to have happened,” he said. “But you can’t change everything about the world. You certainly can’t change things that have already happened.
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From GQ’s 2015 profile of Stephen Colbert.

Every once in a while I come back to this. It’s really so breathtaking.