*buffy

Sometimes I forget that there was a Scooby-Doo movie starring Wendy Corduroy, Mr. Bean, Isla Fisher and Buffy the Vampire Slayer along with several legitimate martial artists and pro wrestlers, created solely because the scriptwriter (Who would later direct Guardians of the Galaxy) hated Scrappy-Doo and wanted everyone else to hate him too.

thewrap.com
Joss Whedon is a 'hypocrite preaching feminist ideals,' says ex-wife Kai Cole
"He used his relationship with me as a shield ... so no one would question his relationships with other women or scrutinize his writing as anything other than feminist," she writes.

I’ve been asked some questions by the press recently about my divorce from Joss Whedon, to whom I was married for 16 years. There is misinformation out there and I feel the best way to clear up the situation is to tell my truth. Let me begin by saying I am a very private person and the act of writing this is antithetical to who I am and everything I stand for. Yet, at the same time, I feel compelled to go on the record and clear up some misperceptions. I don’t think it is fair to me or other women to remain silent any longer.

There were times in our relationship that I was uncomfortable with the attention Joss paid other women. He always had a lot of female friends, but he told me it was because his mother raised him as a feminist, so he just liked women better. He said he admired and respected females, he didn’t lust after them. I believed him and trusted him. On the set of “Buffy,” Joss decided to have his first secret affair.

Fifteen years later, when he was done with our marriage and finally ready to tell the truth, he wrote me, “When I was running ‘Buffy,’ I was surrounded by beautiful, needy, aggressive young women. It felt like I had a disease, like something from a Greek myth. Suddenly I am a powerful producer and the world is laid out at my feet and I can’t touch it.” But he did touch it. He said he understood, “I would have to lie — or conceal some part of the truth — for the rest of my life,” but he did it anyway, hoping that first affair, “would be ENOUGH, that THEN we could move on and outlast it.”

Joss admitted that for the next decade and a half, he hid multiple affairs and a number of inappropriate emotional ones that he had with his actresses, co-workers, fans and friends, while he stayed married to me.

Wow this is bleak.

buzzfeed.com
25 LGBT Characters On TV That Have Made A Difference
Television needs more LGBT characters, but that doesn't mean that there aren't some great people out there already.
By Scott Bryan

1.  Bill Potts (Pearl Mackie) in Doctor Who

Originally posted by assian-candor

“It’s awesome to see a black gay woman who is just casually queer and no one cares. I’m super upset she’s not going to be in Season 11 though, because of course that’s what happens.”

4. Alex Danvers (Chyler Leigh) and Maggie Sawyer (Floriana Lima) in Supergirl

Originally posted by niall69sara-blog

“These characters give me that sense of representation I have been looking for since I came out. Both women hold high-power and important jobs and respect and encourage each other through them. They are the only reason I religiously keep up with the show.”

8. Sara Lance (Caity Lotz) in Legends of Tommorrow

Originally posted by supercanaries

“Sara Lance is absolutely, without a doubt, my icon. She is one of the most badass characters on Arrow / Legends of Tomorrow and she’s had relationships with both men and women, making her the only bisexual hero out there (that I know of at least).”

11. Yorkie (Mackenzie Davis) and Kelly (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) in the “San Junipero” episode of Black Mirror

Originally posted by glovrdonald

“Sometimes I feel I’ll never be able to date a girl because of my shyness towards my identity, but seeing Yorkie in a loving relationship really helped me out.”

13. Waverly Earp (Dominique Provost-Chalkley) and Nicole Haught (Katherine Barrell) in Wynonna Earp

Originally posted by youareavision

“They’re a power couple in such an underrated show that needs to be more recognised. Their relationship is so beautiful and powerful, yet their adorableness doesn’t take away from the fact that they’re both badasses! This show is one of the very few shows that doesn’t queer-bait its audience either.”

16. Nomi Marks (Jamie Clayton) in Sense8

Originally posted by turnthewheel-andthefuturechanges

“She is the first and only trans character I’ve seen whose plotline and character development had nothing to do with being transgender, instead focusing on her relationship with Amanita and her abilities as a hacker.”

25. And Buffy the Vampire Slayer’s Willow (Alyson Hannigan)

Originally posted by vivianorrzuzu

“It felt amazing for teenage me to see a lesbian on TV be characterised not by her orientation but by everything else about her: her nerdiness, her ridiculous fuzzy sweaters, her quirky way of speaking, her growth from a shy and timid wallflower to a confident and powerful witch. I loved that her relationships with her friends were emphasised just as much as her relationships with her girlfriend

Teacher: I want you all to write 10 things you love.

Andi, Buffy, and Cyrus: *start writing*

[Later]

Teacher: *pulls out a piece of paper*

Teacher: Okay who wrote ‘Jonah Beck’ 10 times?

Teacher: *pulls out another one*

Teacher: And who wrote ‘Marty’ 10 times?!

Teacher: *pulls out another one*

Teacher: SERIOUSLY JONAH BECK AGAIN?!