*bennet

Just had a thought.

Since the Framework’s version of Fitz seems to be a genius, playboy billionaire (aka Tony Stark), wouldn’t it make sense that he’s a complete asshole here?

Oh god, like imagine the first time Jemma and Daisy find him. Here they are, expecting him to be the nice, awkward guy that he is. But then he goes full-on douchebag mode, like he tries to have a one-night stand with either of them (or a threesome to up the ante on the douchebag scale).

And Daisy and Jemma aren’t really mad, they kinda just look perplexed because it’s so out of character.

I can definitely see Iain de Caestecker having fun with this though lol.

2

@mingna_wen : Watch #agentsofshield tonight! The star is @misterkarate! Director & writer of tonight’s amazing mind blowing episode!
@lil_henstridge @yosoycordova

Ming-Na Wen : In Coulson’s office. Mission: #LiveTweet. @Lil_Henstridge @YOSOYCORDOVA @MoTancharoen @jedwhedon @GeoffreyColo #AgentsofSHIELD

Do you know why Daisy saw Grant in the Framework, and not Lincoln? Because the first time she was truly happy, Grant was a “nice guy”. Daisy wasn’t in love with the man Grant Ward himself, she was in love with the man she thought he was. That’s why he is in Framework, and not Lincoln. In Daisy’s deepest dreams, Grant was the guy she could love.

Agents of shield spoilers

BRETT DALTON IS A GOOD ACTOR AND ALL BUT I DONT WANT MY BABY WITH HIS HYDRA ASS! WHERE IS LINCOLN? WHERES THAT BEAUTIFUL CREATURE WHO HAD A BETTER RELATIONSHIP WITH DAISY?!? THIS IS FUCKED UP AND IM UPSET YET MY SORRY ASS WILL PROBABLY BE FRONT AND CENTER WHEN THE SHIT COMES BACK ON! ALSO DID I SAY WHAT THE FUCK?

anonymous asked:

Why do you think that Mr. Tilney is often overlooked? Do you know if has a bad habit? (like mister Darcy and his pride)

I think Tilney is probably overlooked in comparison to more romanticized adaptations simply because Northanger Abbey doesn’t get the same treatment in media as, say, Pride and Prejudice, or even Sense and Sensibility or Emma. Catherine is the youngest heroine, a teenager, and her story is more a coming-of-age plot mixed in with literature meta-snark, and the vibe with Tilney is significantly less tortured and dramatic than what we often see with the stormy Elizabeth Bennet/Mr. Darcy dynamic or the angsty parting between Marianne/Willoughby or Elinor/Edward. (Until Catherine gets tossed out by General Tilney in the middle of the night but the whole point is that her expectations about overwrought romanticism are wrong and while hearts can still be broken the business of life is on the whole a lot more caught up in the little practical hum-drum things and the human experience just kind of goes along with all of that.) Bearing in mind that Catherine is a teenager and Northanger Abbey a lesser-known novel (comparatively speaking,) its adaptations are on the lighter side of things, with more comedy and restraint.

Cathy doesn’t rage at Tilney and send him packing after a disastrous proposal, nor does she make herself deathly ill when Tilney abandons her–the stakes are much, much lower (superficially) for Catherine Morland and Henry Tilney. Sure there’s still the risk at the end that they’ve been parted forever and Catherine has only just realized her folly and how much she cares for him and things look pretty bleak for her on an emotional level, but everyone keeps it together pretty pragmatically. I think the story’s focus on Cathy’s personal growth and the light comedy lowering the overall stakes makes it less emphatic in adaptations, including any portrayal of Henry Tilney. It’s just nowhere near as easy to nudge the characters into the Torrid Sex Appeal category (by modern day standards Cathy is a minor so anyone writing that portrayal of her character should be keeping an eye on that while justifying the differences between our time and Austen’s,) and Henry Tilney is a clergyman. Their romance is gentle, funny, playful. They’re both very young, friendly, pretty well-adjusted. The barriers to their happiness are miscommunications and the mild meddling of self-centred, worldly people. It’s pretty understated, on the whole, so I think that whole tone is why Northanger Abbey is less popular than some of the other books, and, consequently, Tilney is less popular than Darcy.

“Season 4 of Agents of SHIELD has focused on the nature of identity and reality, first with Ghost Rider Robbie Reyes, and now with Radcliffe, Aida and the Life Model Decoy program. It’s dredged up dark parts of the core characters’ backstories, from Mack’s tragic loss of his daughter Hope to Fitz’s troubled relationship with his father, and Whedon promises there will be payoff to all the reflection on the past: “There’s a reason we’re bringing those out into the foreground.”“

"This next pod is very relevant,” said Bennet. “It’s definitely a theme that I think has been kind of hopping around in pop culture at the moment. But it’s kind of like a fun Marvel take on that. For all those people who wished to see these characters in a different light, this is going to be the time for that to happen.”
More than just being relevant, the final pod of Season 4 is designed to specifically reward loyal fans of the series. There will be a lot of changes and everything will get “mixed up,” but it also will pay off storylines that have been left hanging for seasons.
Beyond just the “Philinda” ship being realized through an L.M.D. twist, Gregg teased that Hydra will come back in a way that “will surprise the crap out of people.” Whedon also hinted that the Gravitonium cliffhanger from Season 1 might finally be revisited: “We would not be doing our jobs as well as we could if we left that unanswered.”