*Psych

Cassian: How do I look?

Amren: Like an idiot.

Cassian: Sweet.

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You might dismiss meditation as just a trend, but does it actually benefit your brain?

anonymous asked:

Hi, I was recently short-term hospitalized at a psych hospital. I've been out for almost a month but I really miss being hospitalized. I am getting better, but I really want to go back to inpatient. I think because I felt safe and like I belonged. Any advice about getting over that longing? Thanks. Please tag Meep

I can definitely empathize with you, anon. 

After I got out of 2 weeks in inpatient, I desperately wanted to go back. I spent several months longing to be back there, even though I was pretty stable. I longed for the feeling of safety, the experience of community and having less responsibilities. What helped me overcome that was trying to create/find those sorts of feelings/experiences in my ‘normal’ life. I would suggest you try a similar approach- identify what you miss from being there and try to create that in your own life as well.

Here are some examples of what I did: Feeling physically and mentally safe was an aspect I was definitely lacking, so I worked with my therapist and on my own to create that. For me, at first that looked like getting rid of typical tools I self-harmed with and creating a safe corner in my bedroom. I put earplugs, headphones, incense, a notebook, my therapist #, a crisis line card, etc. there. So when I was in crisis or felt myself snowballing toward one, I could go sit there and remind myself that I’m safe and surrounded by healthy coping skills. I wouldn’t let myself get up until the intensity of my main emotion/urge lessened.

I also found a support group and reconnected with an online forum that I had used months ago. Having those people to interact with who ‘get it’, I think it’s important. It can be exhausting trying to explain to others who have not experienced MI firsthand that right now you are struggling. However, I would also recommend reconnecting with other friends/acquaintances as well. We need a balance of people in our lives and having only those around who also battle MI can be difficult.
Being in inpatient also was a short term 'vacation’, if you will. I didn’t have responsibilities looming over my head, obligations or anything else to focus on- just myself and my recovery. To create this in my life, I would allow myself to take a 'mental day off’ where I would tell myself I don’t have to worry about doing anything today, just focus on self-care- whatever I needed that day. I learned to give myself permission to take breaks when needed, so I wouldn’t get myself so caught up that I would need such an extreme break as inpatient was. These are things that, in time, and with patience with myself, worked for me. I also found that in general, as time progressed, that longing to be hospitalized diminished. On occasion, even still, that desire to be back there resurfaces. But I have learned to remember that I have skills and strength now to cope without having to ‘run away’ to the hospital. 
I hope you can work with your therapist, friends or loved ones to find ways to meet the needs of things you found comfort in while you were in the hospital. And remember, it may feel safe there, but what we really need is to keep working to be less impacted by our mental illness.
Take care,
Ari