(with lots of plot)

marcorndiaz  asked:

The ending is actually quite obvious from all the foreshadowing and the tweets that's been teasing us. We all saw this coming. It's sad but it's actually a great way to end season 2 as they say that it will be a dark season.And a theres a lot fanfictions out there i've read that has similar plot like the ending there with star having to leave earth and marco coming back to her and all.Welp the only thing thats bad is here is amount of time we have ti wait for season 3. WHAT DO DO WE DO TILL THEN

Sleep. Time goes faster when you sleep.

i’m kinda really digging a family plot where muse a is the parent and muse b is their child and they either:

a) are on very bad terms and almost never get along. seriously, they can’t be in the same room without one bickering at the other
or
b) muse a is always there for muse b. whether it’s just simple “i hope you have a good day” texts or getting them through serious occasions – they’re
always there for their child

anonymous asked:

Many people have said that Joker and Harley's romance was the worst thing about SS

Hi, 

I don’t want to sound rude, but my immediate response to that is, “who cares?” I mean people hate this ship already so what do I care about them saying that ‘J and Harls relationship was terrible in the movie’. 

If you want a legit answer though, just because something is different from the comics doesn’t make it bad. That’s the only part that kinda annoys me. 

Thanks. 

anonymous asked:

Could you maybe... I know this is a lot to ask, but explain the plot of Red vs. Blue? I want to get in the fandom but it's so much to watch... I'm only on the end of the first season! I would love you 5 ever :)

Heck yeah!  

I’m gonna try to keep this as non-spoilery as possible, but some things I sort of have to reveal.  

The first five seasons are known as the Blood Gulch Chronicles because they all (mostly) take place while the Reds and Blues are in Blood Gulch.  @eponymous-rose described them as “humor with a chance of plot” which is pretty spot on in my opinion.  (The first season is the hardest, trust me.  Trust me.)  

Wikipedia is my best friend and helped me start this with: “Red vs. Blue centers on the Red and Blue Teams, two groups of soldiers engaged in a supposed civil war. Originally, each team occupies a small base in a box canyon known as Blood Gulch. According to Simmons, one of the Red Team soldiers, each team’s base exists only in response to the other team’s base. It is later revealed that there is no actual civil war; both the Red and Blue armies are under the same command, Project Freelancer, and only exist as training simulations for Freelancer Agents. Although both teams generally dislike each other and have standing orders to defeat their opponents and capture their flag, neither team is usually motivated to fight the other (except for Sarge, the head of Red Team).”  

Keep reading

eene-fangirl  asked:

Do you think Edd comes off as the main character of the series?

No, the series as a whole is definitely about Eddy.  There are a lot of episodes that do specifically focus on Edd, but ultimately Eddy’s goals drive the show, and it becomes really clear in BPS that it is his story.  One could look at it this way: without Edd, the show would lose a lot of heart and good character dynamics, so it would be a whole lot less interesting and probably not enjoyable because Eddy would not have someone to offset his chaotic antagonism towards the other kids (like, wow this world would be cynical), but it would still be possible to create plots with conflict.  Without Eddy, not a whole lot would happen.  There would not really be conflict with the other kids.  No scams.  No hijinks.  Would Ed and Edd even be friends?  

So yeah, both worlds are very depressing, but one of them could theoretically still function as a show (and honestly there are a lot of shows that have the problems that this show would have- not a lot of interesting ways for characters to interact, and nobody pulling the more selfish characters back to say “Hey, wait a second, that’s not right!”  I think Eddy would go way too far in an incarnation without Edd and I do not think he would be nearly as likable…. and poor Ed would be along for the ride with nobody to remind Eddy to value his friends.)  The version of the show without Eddy would not be a show at all, just a bunch of kids living mundane lives.

Or maybe it was Plank’s story all along.

So really want that weird Axel keyart medal in Japanese so I’ve been running through the missions to collect jewels (behind by about 100 missions) and three things

  1. DAMN THE BOSSES HAVE A LOT OF HEALTH NOW, I mean I know it’s the power creep (which has allowed me to one shot/two shot bosses I couldn’t in the past) but still. 
  2. The Ira battle was awesome. Especially that one teleporty move. 
  3.  It’s weird being in Vulpes cause you get to watch your Union leader do a lot for the plot and get your ass kicked by her often. Admittedly I’ve felt this for a while now though. 

Poor Yurio can’t catch a break, even over long distance video calls (Viktor you act oblivious but we all know otherwise)

 I’ve seen a few posts around saying that Andy was problematic or that the episode would have worked just fine without him. The thing to remember is that the crewniverse creates this show to be relatable not only in ways that have us singing from the mountain tops, but also in ways that are a little harder for us to face. Maybe in ways that make us uncomfortable, but are very much issues that we need to address as well. 

How many people were reminded of their own closed minded family members while watching Andy? My literal thoughts were ‘oh look, it’s my dad in an SU ep!’, before wanting to sink away from second hand embarrassment for the comments he made. Because man, have I been there before. 

Because who hasn’t had their sort of uncle freak out over the illegal hippy martian immigrant farmers your dad said could live in his barn? 

No but really. Especially that part about hearing about this on AM radio? Yeah, at least one writer has come up close and personal with this type of specimen. It may seem that given the timing of certain current events, the last thing anyone wants to see on SU is one of THOSE types. 

But here’s the thing: they exist. You can hide your head under a rock all you want, but they’re still there. So what do we do? We actually get two points of view on this. One: the gems as literal aliens. On a good day they really don’t understand even the most open minded of humans. So here they are running smack into one that’s mad about a world that’s changing even without the interference of the gems. And he’s upset that they’re not acting in the “traditional” roles he’s use to seeing human women in. Never mind that they’re not human, or technically speaking, women. They’re there in his barn, messing with his things, and really there’s no way this can end well. 

Until you bring in the nephew he never knew he had. Who just so happens to be very, very interested in learning about his human family.And who just wants everyone to get along. Because let’s face it, that’s Steven’s MO. He’s so focused on finding out that his family name is ‘Demayo’ that Andy’s comment to Greg ‘not even marrying an American’ floats right by him. But it was very much meant for the audience to hear. 

Not that any of that matters to Steven, he’s already planning the most awkward family reunion in the galaxy. 

And the Gems, bless their hearts, are eager to make Steven happy.

And honestly, for all his misgivings, so is Andy.

To a point anyway. Until he realizes that maybe, just maybe things are changing. That change is coming whether he likes it or not. And that change can never, ever be one sided. 

And at the first Thanksgiving, the gems and the humans gave thanks for polyamorous wedding cake, corn, this table, and traumatizing life events.

The thing about change is that it’s never simple. It never happens over night. Both sides are scared or angry, or very probably both. They’re also sure that their side is the right side. 

And even when it seems like everything is going right, you’re trying so hard include everyone in your new vision and it seems like you’re really getting through to them, they just… slip away. Because change is scary. Because they’re going through the motions without really understanding why. Because sometimes it’s easier to go along with things even if they don’t agree, even if their heart isn’t in it. So again, what do you do?

You listen. You hear their fears. You let them come to their own conclusions that maybe, just maybe, things HAVE to change. 

But that doesn’t mean being left behind. 

Now for reality: It’s never as simple as this. Bigotry isn’t faced and solved in 20 minutes. No one is saying it is. Sometimes it’s safer not to face it, and sometimes you just can’t. 

But I think overall its meant to be a message of hope- just like the overall message of Steven Universe is a positive one. People have opposing points of view. Talk. Listen. See that in the end you have more in common than you ever thought possible and go from there. Also: family is what you make of it. Even if it’s a dad, an estranged uncle, an alien hybrid child and his hippy illegal martian immigrant aunts. It can work, as long as you work together.

anonymous asked:

That thing you draw with matsuhana... Will you keep it up or was it... A one night thing... Sorry i just woke up my head is still dizzy ^^

Uh, if you mean “is there a story to it?” then nope, I just woke up with that scene in mind so I drew it? It was an out-of-the-blue sort of idea but I rolled with it anyway, I guess haha

6

i actually finished this drawing almost 2 months ago but totally forgot to upload it lmao

based on this (even though these characters technically aren’t my OCs… but whatever)

please help these children

Now  before I get back to my homework for a little while, please consider: a power swap Gradence AU set in canon, where Credence Barebone is the young and exceptionally talented head of magical law enforcement that everyone looks up too, and Percival Graves is the quiet old man who never married but takes care of the orphans, wants to protect them from the weird, wild magic happening at night, and is quite troubled when this handsome boy comes in and asks for information with seductive smiles.

On trauma aftermaths that don't advance the plot

The way TV shows trauma can lead people to expect every reference to trauma to be a plot point. This can be isolating to people coping with the aftermaths of trauma. Sometimes people treat us as stories rather than as people. Sometimes, instead of listening to us, they put a lot of pressure on us to advance the plot they’re expecting.

On TV, triggers tend to be full audiovisual flashbacks that add something to the story. You see a vivid window into the character’s past, and something changes. On TV, trauma aftermaths are usually fascinating. Real life trauma aftermaths are sometimes interesting, but also tend to be very boring to live with.

On TV, triggers tend to create insight. In real life, they’re often boring intrusions interfering with the things you’d rather be thinking about. Sometimes knowing darn well where they come from doesn’t make them go away. Sometimes it’s more like: Seriously? This again?

On TV, when trauma is mentioned, it’s usually a dramatic plot point that happens in a moment. In real life, trauma aftermaths are a mundane day-to-day reality that people live with. They’re a fact of life — and not necessarily the most important one at all times. People who have experienced trauma do other things too. They’re important, but not the one and only defining characteristic of who someone is. And things that happened stay important even when you’re ok. Recovery is not a reset. Mentioning the past doesn’t necessarily mean you’re in crisis.

On TV, when a character mentions trauma, or gets triggered in front of someone, it’s usually a dramatic moment. It changes their life, or their relationship with another character, or explains their backstory, or something. In real life, being triggered isn’t always a story, and telling isn’t always a turning point. Sometimes it’s just mentioning something that happened to be relevant. Sometimes it’s just a mundane instance of something that happens from time to time.

Most people can’t have a dramatic transformative experience every time it turns out that their trauma matters. Transformative experiences and moments of revelation exist, but they’re not the end all and be all of trauma aftermaths. Life goes on, and other things matter too. And understanding what a reaction means and where it came from doesn’t always make it go away. Sometimes, it takes longer and has more to do with skill-building than introspection. Sometimes it doesn’t go away.

On a day to day level, it’s often better to be matter-of-fact about aftermaths. It can be exhausting when people see you as a story and expect you to advance the plot whenever they notice some effect of trauma. Pressure to perform narratives about healing doesn’t often help people to make their lives better. Effect support involves respecting someone as a complex human, including the boring parts.

The aftermath of trauma is a day-to-day reality. It affects a lot of things, large and small. It can be things like being too tired to focus well in class because nightmares kept waking you up every night this week. TV wants that to be a dramatic moment where the character faces their past and gets better. In real life, it’s often a day where you just do your best to try and learn algebra anyway. Because survivors do things besides be traumatized and think about trauma. Sometimes it’s not a story. Sometimes it’s just getting through another day as well as possible.

A lot of triggers are things like being unable to concentrate on anything interesting because some kinds of background noises make you feel too unsafe to pay attention to anything else. For the zillionth time.  Even though you know rationally that they’re not dangerous. Even though you know where they come from, and have processed it over and over. Even if you’ve made a lot of progress in dealing with them, even if they’re no longer bothersome all the time. For most people, recovery involves a lot more than insight. The backstory might be interesting, but being tired and unable to concentrate is boring.

Triggers can also mean having to leave an event and walk home by yourself while other people are having fun, because it turns out that it hurts too much to be around pies and cakes. Or having trouble finding anything interesting to read that isn’t intolerably triggering. Or having trouble interacting with new people because you’re too scared or there are too many minefields. Or being so hypervigilant that it’s hard to focus on anything. No matter how interesting the backstory is, feeling disconnected and missing out on things you wanted to enjoy is usually boring.

When others want to see your trauma as a story, their expectations sometimes expand to fill all available space. Sometimes they seem to want everything to be therapy, or want everything to be about trauma and recovery.

When others want every reference to trauma to be the opening to a transformative experience, it can be really hard to talk about accommodations. For instance, it gets hard to say things like:

  • “I’m really tired because of nightmares” or 
  • “I would love to go to that event, but I might need to leave because of the ways in which that kind of thing can be triggering” or 
  • “I’m glad I came, but I can’t handle this right now” or
  • “I’m freaking out now, but I’ll be ok in a few minutes” or 
  • “I need to step out — can you text me when they stop playing this movie?”

It can also be hard to mention relevant experiences. There are a lot of reasons to mention experiences other than wanting to process, eg:

  • “Actually, I have experience dealing with that agency”
  • “That’s not what happens when people go to the police, in my experience, what happens when you need to make a police report is…”
  • “Please keep in mind that this isn’t hypothetical for me, and may not be for others in the room as well.”

Or any number of other things.

When people are expecting a certain kind of story, they sometimes look past the actual person. And when everyone is looking past you in search of a story, it can be very hard to make connections.

It helps to realize that no matter what others think, your story belongs to you. You don’t have to play out other people’s narrative expectations. It’s ok if your story isn’t what others want it to be. It’s ok not to be interesting. It’s ok to have trauma reactions that don’t advance the plot. And there are people who understand that, and even more people who can learn to understand that.

It’s possible to live a good life in the aftermath of trauma. It’s possible to relearn how to be interested in things. It’s possible to build space you can function in, and to build up your ability to function in more spaces. It’s often possible to get over triggers. All of this can take a lot of time and work, and can be a slow process. It doesn’t always make for a good story, and it doesn’t always play out the way others would like it to. And, it’s your own personal private business. Other people’s concern or curiosity does not obligate you to share details.

Survivors and victims have the right to be boring. We have the right to deal with trauma aftermaths in a matter-of-fact way, without indulging other people’s desires for plot twists. We have the right to own our own stories, and to keep things private. We have the right to have things in our lives that are not therapy; we have the right to needed accommodations without detailing what happened and what recovery looks like. Neither traumatic experiences nor trauma aftermaths erase our humanity.

We are not stories, and we have no obligation to advance an expected plot. We are people, and we have the right to be treated as people. Our lives, and our stories, are our own.