(and some other dudes)

The moment you realise that you know more about a band than your own family

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can we please stop making the only LGBT+ narrative we see “i always knew?”

like, i didn’t always know i liked girls too. i wasn’t having crushes on them or kissing them on the playground when i was five years old like you see on tv or read in books. i didn’t know for sure that i’m bi until literally this year (i’m 17 as of writing this). a former friend of mine is a trans girl. she didn’t always know. she didn’t realize she was trans until she was nearly eighteen years old. some people don’t realize it until they’re twenty, or forty, or sixty.

some people do always know. good for them! but can we please please please make it known that you don’t have to have always known for your identity to be valid? it makes it so difficult for people who are figuring themselves out later in life, because it feeds into this idea of “why didn’t i know it before? is this even real? if i haven’t known i’ve felt this way all along, how do i know i feel it now?” and that’s only making worse what’s already such a difficult time in life

give me eighty year old women who are just figuring out they’re lesbians. give me middle aged accountants who realize they’re actually trans. give me a guy who doesn’t know until he’s twenty-eight that he’s actually into dudes. god just please give us some other narrative, so we can be reassured that even if it took us a while to get there, our identity is no less valid than that of a person who’s known they’re LGBT+ since elementary school. stop telling LGBT+ people that that’s the only way they’re really LGBT+

everybody warned that easing dysphoria about one area could exacerbate it in other places and i thought they were talking shit. I’M SORRY I WAS YOUNG AND FOOLISH NOW I KNOW BETTER

(It’s been a rough bodypart day today so I thought some of my other dudes might like to know that they’re not alone if they’re having one too.)

Guys, guys, lookit, the Joyfire Week prompts are up! (August 15 - 21, 2017!)

Day 1:  Origin/Body Swap // Identity Shenanigans
Day 2:  Magic/Supernatural AU // A very bad idea
Day 3:  Villain AU/Controlled by Villain // Sleep Deprivation
Day 4:  Undercover // Royalty
Day 5:  Meet the Family // Bodyguards
Day 6:  No Capes!AU // Matching Tattoos
Day 7:  Assassins // Secret Crush

I love when weeks give me two options for every day. <3

2

30 Days of Fairy Tail

Day 12: Favourite Friendship - Phantom Duo (Gajeel & Juvia)

Seeing people complain about the CW’s lack of positive female rep and in particular female friendships is great. Seeing them complain about Arrow especially is even better.

Seeing them complain about it without mentioning Laurel Lance though, is WILD.

“Felicity’s so isolated, she has no female friendships”

“The new team has no women”

“What happened to women supporting women”

“Why are there no female friendships”

like, man, I dunno, it’s like they all disappeared for NO REASON I WONDER WHAT HAPPENED

I drew Prowl with a sparkler around this time last year (except it wasn’t digital) so since I don’t have any other ideas I’m just gonna do it again this year lol. Here’s a quick sloppy drawing for the 4th of July :0

where on earth did he get a sparkler that big??

The Writers’ Room

Carmilla Writers: You know what would be really funny? If we killed a lesbian at the end of each season, but then brought them back to life…

Orphan Black Writers: Wow, you know that sounds like a great idea! Except we’re going to wait a whole season to bring back our character! It will make the fans go INSANE!

The 100 Writers: How about we just bring back our lesbian character in some digital framework of sorts, then our protagonist can end up with some dude instead. **high five each other**

Wynonna Earp Writers: Y’all are crazyI Our gays will live FOREVER!!! BULLET PROOF VEST FOR YOU, BULLET PROOF VEST FOR YOU, BULLET PROOF VEST FOR EVERYONE!!!!

youtube

Here’s a thing that I worked on that I can finally share! :0

This was a collaboration with 2 other animators, I mostly just helped out with coloring frames. I also did rough animation on most of the human characters, but some of them were finalized by someone else. All the humans up till the research scene were all me tho!

The quest for knowledge gets really frustrating when what you want to learn about is such a niche topic that like only 2 fucking people in the world actually have information on it like do you know how many fucking people I had to email to get my hands on papers about hot subdwarf stars I fucking,, Skyped people in GERMANY just to have them explain to me how they came to some frankly ludicrous conclusions about submass white dwarf supernovae and how the fuck they think it ties into hot subdwarf binary systems and how I had to compare data that they had to the data that some other dude from North Carolina had from some data sets from NASA’s swift satellite oh my god anyway moral of the story is don’t let anything stand in your way in your quest to Know Shit

Nobody’s going to deny that, as it’s conventionally depicted, Middle-Earth - the setting of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings - is awfully monochrome. In art, basically everybody is drawn as white, and all major depictions in film have used white actors.

When this state of affairs is questioned, the defences typically revolve around “accuracy”, which can mean one of two things: fidelity to the source material, and the internal consistency of the setting. Being concerned primarily with languages and mythology, Tolkien left few clear descriptions of what the peoples of Middle-Earth actually look like, so in this case, arguments in favour of the status quo more often rest on setting consistency.

Of course, we need hold ourselves neither to fidelity nor to consistency - the author’s dead, and we can do what we want. However, what if I told you that there’s a reasonable argument to be made from that very standpoint of setting consistency that Aragorn - the one character you’d most expect to be depicted as a white dude - really ought to be portrayed as Middle Eastern and/or North African?

First, consider the framing device of Tolkien’s work. The central conceit of The Lord of the Rings - one retroactively extended to The Hobbit, and thereafter to later works - is that Tolkien himself is not the story’s author, but a mere translator of writings left behind by Bilbo, Frodo and other major characters. Similarly, Middle-Earth itself is positioned not as a fictional realm, but as the actual prehistory of our own world. As such, the languages and mythologies that Tolkien created were intended not merely to resemble their modern counterparts, but to stand as plausible ancestors for them.

Now, Aragorn is the king of a tribe or nation of people called the Dúnedain. Let’s take a closer look at them in the context of that prehistoric connection.

If the Dúnedain were meant to be the forebears of Western Europeans, we’d expect their language, Adûnaic, to exhibit signs of Germanic (or possibly Italic) derivation - but that’s not what we actually see. Instead, both the phonology and the general word-structure of Adûnaic seem to be of primarily Semitic derivation, i.e., the predominant language family throughout the Middle East and much of North Africa. Indeed, while relatively little Adûnaic vocabulary is present in Tolkien’s extant writings, some of the words we do know seem to be borrowed directly from classical Hebrew - a curious choice if the “men of the West” were intended to represent the ancestors of the Germanic peoples.

Additionally, the Dúnedain are descended from the survivors of the lost island of Númenor, which Tolkien had intended as an explicit analogue of Atlantis. Alone, this doesn’t give us much to go on - unless one happens to know that, in the legendarium from which Tolkien drew his inspirations, the Kingdoms of Egypt were alleged to be remnant colonies of Atlantis. This connection is explicitly reflected in the strong Egyptian influence upon Tolkien’s descriptions of Númenorean funereal customs. We thus have both linguistic and cultural/mythological ties linking the survivors of Númenor to North Africa.

Now, I’m not going to claim that Tolkien actually envisioned the Dúnedain as North African; he was almost certainly picturing white folks. However, when modern fans argue that Aragorn and his kin must be depicted as white as a matter of setting consistency, rather than one of mere authorial preference, strong arguments can be made that this need not be the case; i.e., that depicting the Dúnedain in a manner that would be racialised as Middle Eastern and/or North African by modern standards is, in fact, entirely consistent with the source material, ethnolinguistically speaking. Furthermore, whether they agreed with these arguments or not, any serious Tolkien scholar would at least be aware of them.

In other words, if some dude claims that obviously everyone in Tolkien is white and acts like the very notion of depicting them otherwise is some outlandish novelty, you’ve got yourself a fake geek boy.

(As an aside, if we turn our consideration to the Easterlings, the human allies of Sauron who have traditionally been depicted in art as Middle Eastern on no stronger evidence than the fact that they’re baddies from the East, a similar process of analysis suggests that they’d more reasonably be racialised as Slavic in modern terms. Taken together with the preceding discussion, an argument can be made that not only is the conventional racialisation of Tolkien’s human nations in contemporary art unsupported by the source material, we may well have it precisely backwards!)