(1917)

Chinese New Year 1986 fell on February 9 when the new moon of the springtime inaugurated the Year of the Tiger. The Chinese say that the tiger in astrology signifies rebellion, upheaval, reform. The events of the four days that toppled the Marcos dictatorship in the Philippines occurred when the New Year moon of the tiger was achieving its fullness.
— 

Nick Joaquin (1917-2004), National Artist for Literature, on the preface of his book entitled Quartet of the Tiger Moon: Scenes from the People-Power Apocalypse (1986). In the book, he used his pseudonym, “Quijano de Manila.”


In celebration of the 30th anniversary of the EDSA People Power Revolution of February 1986, a peaceful revolution that ended an oppressive dictatorship in the Philippines, to the shock of the entire world. 

“Billy” Bishop would of been 122 years old today (February 8th).

William Avery “Billy” Bishop (1894–1956) is one of Canada’s best-known flying aces. Bishop grew up in Owen Sound, Ontario, and in 1911 enrolled as a student cadet at the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston. The outbreak of war during his final year of study prevented him from graduating and hastened his entry into active service. He enlisted with the 9th Mississauga Horse Regiment of the Canadian Expeditionary Force in Toronto on September 30, 1914.

The following year, he enlisted with the 7th Canadian Mounted Rifles on March 30th in London, and left Canada that June for duty overseas. After serving in the trenches briefly, he transferred to the Royal Flying Corps, initially as an officer observer, then as a pilot after receiving his wings in November 1916.

As one of the pilots providing aerial support during the Battle of Vimy Ridge, Bishop shot down 12 planes in April 1917 alone, winning the Military Cross and earning a promotion to Captain. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for his single-handed attack on a German airfield near Cambrai, France, on June 2, 1917.* By the end of the First World War, Bishop had been promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and was credited with destroying 72 enemy aircraft. After the war, he was involved in a number of private business ventures in Canada and England. He served during the Second World War, assuming recruitment and training responsibilities for the Royal Canadian Air Force. William A. “Billy” Bishop died on September 11, 1956 at his home in West Palm Beach, Florida.

* There’s a lot of controversy over Bishop including his VC action which was awarded on the basis of his own incorporated claim of downing 3 Albatross Scouts in one mission. ** “Mick” Mannock is usually credited as having 73 Victories because of a book written about him by James Ira Thomas Jones after the war. Jones was a close friend of Mannock’s and apparently he was the person who used some “creative accounting” to credit Mannock with 73 victories, ie one more than the 72 credited to Billy Bishop, who Jones is said to have disliked.

anonymous asked:

Just to give you a heads up, I actually prefer Leuchtturm 1917 notebooks way more than Moleskine. The paper quality is far superior (I got excited about Moleskine until I found even pencil shadowed through to the other side of pages...). Leuchtturm offer the same ranges of paper styles (squared, dotted, and lined), have the appearance of Moleskine, and are slightly cheaper. So if you're looking for a similar style with better quality I'd suggest them (I'm in the UK and got mine on Amazon)

I think I might order one, so far I’ve heard nothing but great things about them so the seem pretty promising. I’ll keep you guys updated x

anonymous asked:

Okay so first off, a HUGE thanks to you guys because seriously, all the fics you rec are AMAZING. (Well and killed me with the feels a lot of time too.... but still amazing) Also I'm just wondering, but do you guys have anything on reincarnation AUs?

The one we have is You Have Infinite Choice! let us know if you know of any others!

update: @sproings sent in Souls, Love, Classic Movies, and Other Immortal Things by WanderingAlice               

update pt 2: @s-leary sent in 1917 by MsBluesunflower                

During the First World War, it was soon realized that the United States Army needed to train and enlist more soldiers. At times, this meant preparing boys not yet of enlisting age for military service. As seen in this photograph, one such facility was established in Peekskill, New York. Here, boys between the ages of sixteen and nineteen would spend the summer learning infantry skills from camping to shooting. The boys pictured here are receiving mail at the camp.   Date: July 1917
5

Trying this again on the blog I meant to put these on

I admit it, I am an impatient little thing and I don’t like waiting to share things.  So… I’ve decided not to, everything goes up when I have it, but won’t be every day anymore.  I’ll be rearranging the Patreon with other benefits here soon, though.

That said, today was a driving and photo day.  Photos here are from Historic McKee Bridge, near Jacksonville, Oregon.  Built all the way back in 1917, when, as you can see, the entire world was sepiatone, right?  

#SuperBowls of American history

Isn’t it great that we have a whole day set aside to honor the super bowls of our nation’s heritage? 

Julia Child whisked eggs for an omelet in this French copper bowl on the first test episode of The French Chef in 1963.

This Hamilton Beach stand mixer was one of the appliances Louisan Mamer used to demonstrate the convenience and proper use of electrical kitchen appliances to farm women in rural areas that were newly connected to the electrical grid. Mamer worked for the Rural Electrification Administration, which was part of the New Deal. 

This large Chinese export bowl features a panoramic view of the hongs—the office, warehouse, and living spaces for foreign merchants in Canton, China, in the late 18th century.

This 1917 cut glass bowl with sterling silver (newly fashionable at the time) was made by T. G. Hawkes & Company of Corning, New York.

Thanks for joining us to spend some time appreciating these historic bowls. If you’d like to see more examples as you continue Super Bowl Sunday, check out these superb examples on our blog.