'soon forget'

i love rugby

(2/3) “We celebrated our 50th wedding anniversary in Branson, Missouri. On the drive home, she kept telling me that we were going the wrong way. She was very insistent. I didn’t fight her. I kept letting her turn around because I knew that eventually we’d hit the main road back to Michigan. I knew then. Her father had dementia. And so did his father. So I knew what was happening. Soon she started forgetting names. When it started getting really bad, she wanted to walk away. She was always trying to leave the house. I’d have to lie in front of the door to keep her from going. One morning I woke up and I couldn’t find her. I freaked out: ‘Where did she go? Where did she go?’ I ran outside and it was totally dark. Down the road there was a streetlight. And I could barely see her—crossing the road. I ran and I got her. But she fought me. She didn’t want to come back home.”

I’m picking myself this time.
—  Because I’ve got a shortage inside this heart of mine and some days it still feels like it’s beating for other people when it should be working for this smile that I’ve been faking and I know you’ll hate these decisions, but I’m just another crease we can’t iron, I’m just another book we put down and I’m a lost poem you’ll never read again. Some days I’m still trying to find myself while being lost, some nights I’m clinging onto the longest parts of the breaking. Daylight comes short when all I’ve been doing is sleep, so this is just another letter you won’t be getting. Silence is an old friend and you’ll kiss it until your lips are thin. These secrets won’t leave my lips, I won’t kiss where it hurts anymore. You’re a memory I’ll soon forget, but not until these poems start to look like you. I used to write to remember, but lately… I’ve just been writing to forget about you.

You are the dancing queen, 

who replaces spleens, 

dominating the DDR machine.

3

sora and donald are angry children while goofy tries to tame them and jiminy looks up in fear but is also slightly aroused

Hundreds of thousands of people descended on the nation’s capital to attend the Women’s March. This is one participant’s story: Jenan Matari, a Muslim-American woman who co-founded the website MissMuslim.nyc. Based in Hoboken, New Jersey, Jenan had been looking forward to the event for weeks. She invites Mic into her home to meet her family and share her concerns about a Trump presidency, and tells us why the march is something her and fiance won’t soon forget.