'so here's my question: when you lose the most important person to you in the entire world

The Dos and Don’ts of Beginning a Novel:  An Illustrated Guide

I’ve had a lot of asks lately for how to begin a book (or how not to), so here’s a post on my general rules of thumb for story openers and first chapters!  

Please note, these are incredibly broad generalizations;  if you think an opener is right for you, and your beta readers like it, there’s a good chance it’s A-OK.  When it comes to writing, one size does not fit all.  (Also note that this is for serious writers who are interested in improving their craft and/or professional publication, so kindly refrain from the obligatory handful of comments saying “umm, screw this, write however you want!!”)

So without further ado, let’s jump into it!

Don’t: 

1.  Open with a dream. 

“Just when Mary Sue was sure she’d disappear down the gullet of the monstrous, winged pig, she woke up bathed in sweat in her own bedroom.”

What?  So that entire winged pig confrontation took place in a dream and amounts to nothing?  I feel so cheated! 

Okay, not too many people open their novels with monstrous swine, but you get the idea:  false openings of any kind tend to make the reader feel as though you’ve wasted their time, and don’t usually jump into more meaty action of the story quickly enough.  It makes your opening feel lethargic and can leave your audience yawning.

Speaking of… 

2.  Open with a character waking up.  

This feels familiar to most of us, but unless your character is waking up to a zombie attack or an alien invasion, it’s generally a pretty easy recipe to get your story to drag.

No one picks a book to hear how your character brushes their teeth in the morning or what they’d like to have for dinner.  As a general rule of thumb, we read to explore things we wouldn’t otherwise get to experience.  And cussing out the alarm clock is not one of them.  

Granted, there are exceptions if your writing is exceptionally engaging, but in most cases it just sets a slow pace that will bore you and your reader to death and probably cause you to lose interest in your book within the first ten pages.  

3.  Bombard with exposition.  

Literary characters aren’t DeviantArt OCs.  And the best way to convey a character is not, in my experience, to devote the first ten pages to describing their physical appearance, personality, and backstory.  Develop your characters, and make sure their fully fleshed out – my tips on how to do so here – but you don’t need to dump all that on the reader before they have any reason to care about them.  Let the reader get to know the character gradually, learn about them, and fall in love with them as they would a person:  a little bit at a time.   

This is iffy when world building is involved, but even then it works best when the delivery feels organic and in tune with the book’s overall tone.  Think the opening of the Hobbit or Good Omens.

4.  Take yourself too seriously.

Your opener (and your novel in general) doesn’t need to be intellectually pretentious, nor is intellectual pretense the hallmark of good literature.  Good literature is, generally speaking, engaging, well-written, and enjoyable.  That’s it.  

So don’t concern yourself with creating a poetic masterpiece of an opening line/first chapter.  Just make one that’s – you guessed it – engaging, well-written, and enjoyable. 

5.  Be unintentionally hilarious.

Utilizing humor in your opening line is awesome, but check yourself to make sure your readers aren’t laughing for all the wrong reasons (this is another reason why betas are important.)  

These examples of the worst opening lines in published literature will show you what I mean – and possibly serve as a pleasant confidence booster as well: 

“As the dark and mysterious stranger approached, Angela bit her lip anxiously, hoping with every nerve, cell, and fiber of her being that this would be the one man who would understand – who would take her away from all this – and who would not just squeeze her boob and make a loud honking noise, as all the others had.”

– Ali Kawashima

“She sipped her latte gracefully, unaware of the milk foam droplets building on her mustache, which was not the peachy-fine baby fuzz that Nordic girls might have, but a really dense, dark, hirsute lip-lining row of fur common to southern Mediterranean ladies nearing menopause, and winked at the obviously charmed Spaniard at the next table.”

– Jeanne Villa

“As I gardened, gazing towards the autumnal sky, I longed to run my finger through the trail of mucus left by a single speckled slug – innocuously thrusting past my rhododendrons – and in feeling that warm slime, be swept back to planet Alderon, back into the tentacles of the alien who loved me.”

– Mary E. Patrick

“Before they met, his heart was a frozen block of ice, scarred by the skate blades of broken relationships, then she came along and like a beautiful Zamboni flooded his heart with warmth, scraped away the ugly slushy bits, and dumped them in the empty parking lot of his soul.”

– Howie McClennon

If these can get published, so can you.

Do:

1.  You know that one really interesting scene you’re itching to write?  Start with that.

Momentum is an important thing in storytelling.  If you set a fast, infectious beat, you and your reader will be itching to dance along with it.  

Similarly, slow, drowsy openers tend to lead to slow, drowsy stories that will put you both to sleep.

I see a lot of posts joking about “that awkward moment when you sit down to write but don’t know how to get to that one scene you actually wanted to write about.”  Write that scene!  If it’s at all possible, start off with it.  If not, there are still ways you can build your story around the scenes you actually want to write.

Keep in mind:  if you’re bored, your reader will almost certainly be bored as well.  So write what you want to write.  Write what makes you excited.  Don’t hold off until later, when it “really gets good.”  Odds are, the reader will not wait around that long, and you’re way more likely to become disillusioned with your story and quit.  If a scene is dragging, cut it out.  Burn bridges, find a way around.  Live, dammit. 

2.  Engage the reader.

There are several ways to go about this.  You can use wit and levity, you can present a question, and you can immerse the reader into the world you’ve created.  Just remember to do so with subtlety, and don’t try too hard;  believe me, it shows.  

Here are some of my personal favorite examples of engaging opening lines: 

“In the beginning, the universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move." 

– Douglas Adams, the Restaurant at the End of the Universe.

"It was the day my grandmother exploded.”

– Iain Banks, Crow Road.

“A white Pomeranian named Fluffy flew out of the a fifth-floor window in Panna, which was a grand-new building with the painter’s scaffolding still around it. Fluffy screamed.”

– Vikram Chandra, Sacred Games.

See what I’m saying?  They pull you in and do not let go.

3.  Introduce us to a main character (but do it right.)

“Shadow had done three years in prison. He was big enough and looked don’t-fuck-with-me enough that his biggest problem was killing time. So he kept himself in shape, and taught himself coin tricks, and thought a lot about how much he loved his wife.”

– Neil Gaiman, American Gods.

This is one of my favorite literary openings of all time, because right off the bat we know almost everything we need to know about Shadow’s character (i.e. that he’s rugged, pragmatic, and loving.)   

Also note that it doesn’t tell us everything about Shadow:  it presents questions that make us want to read more.  How did Shadow get into prison?  When will he get out?  Will he reunite with his wife?  There’s also more details about Shadow slowly sprinkled in throughout the book, about his past, personality, and physical appearance.  This makes him feel more real and rounded as a character, and doesn’t pull the reader out of the story.

Obviously, I’m not saying you should rip off American Gods.  You don’t even need to include a hooker eating a guy with her cooch if you don’t want to.  

But this, and other successful openers, will give you just enough information about the main character to get the story started;  rarely any good comes from infodumping, and allowing your reader to get to know your character gradually will make them feel more real.   

4.  Learn from the greats.

My list of my favorite opening lines (and why I love them) is right here.

5.  Keep moving.  

The toughest part of being a writer is that it’s a rare and glorious occasion when you’re actually satisfied with something you write.  And to add another layer of complication, what you like best probably won’t be what your readers will like best. 

If you refuse to keep moving until you have the perfect first chapter, you will never write anything beyond your first chapter.  

Set a plan, and stick to it:  having a daily/weekly word or page goal can be extremely helpful, especially when you’re starting out.  Plotting is a lifesaver (some of my favorite posts on how to do so here, here, and here.)

Keep writing, keep moving, and rewrite later.  If you stay in one place for too long, you’ll never keep going. 

Best of luck, and happy writing.  <3

An All-Inclusive Guide to Making Your First Year in Practice Not Suck As Much As Wayfaring’s

Hi there, just curious if you’d share what things you were looking for in your first job vs what things you value now, now that you’ve been working out there on your own. Anything that must be in the contract that wasn’t there before (or vice versa)? Tips for future graduating residents?

Yaaaaasssss so many advices. So many things. This ask has been in my inbox for months because I have too many things to say about it and I can’t seem to organize it properly. 

Let’s break it down into 3 sections: 1) What I thought I wanted 2) What I needed and didn’t know to ask/look for 3) What I want now. Here goes.

What I thought I wanted:

  • big dolla$$$
  • super sweet signing bonus
  • moving allowance
  • loan repayment assistance
  • regular 40 hour work schedule
  • nice patients
  • independence / autonomy in decisionmaking
  • ability to practice the way I was trained - with up to date guidelines and procedures and equipment


What I wanted and didn’t know to ask for:

  • Supportive colleagues - In your first year of practice out of residency you lose every ounce of confidence that you gained as a senior resident. You question minor decisions and are constantly afraid of killing people or being sued. It is extra hard to practice in a new town when your partners in practice are not supportive. Sometimes you need someone to lay a fresh set of eyes on a wonky EKG or a weird rash, you know? I didn’t have that option. It made me study harder and somewhat be more cautious and definitely more creative in my practice. But having a colleague to commiserate with at the end of the day or to consult on difficult cases would have been really nice. You don’t have to be BFFs with your colleagues, but they have to be people you can agree/get along with and trust to take care of your patients in your absence.
  • Friends - This sounds obvious, but I moved to a new town that literally has no people anywhere close to my age. Even having one person I knew and could confide in would have been wonderful. One person to go to a movie with or watch a football game with would have been a sanity saver for me. Find a place where you can find other people like you. 
  • A reasonable amount of time off - I got less time off in my first job than I did as a resident. That was unacceptable to me. This would be fine if my practice didn’t act like they were going to go bankrupt if I took an unpaid day or even a half day to go to the doctor, but they did. You need a place where you can take one week off every 3-4 months if possible, even if all that time isn’t paid. Medicine is such a stressful job. Make sure they’re giving you rest time.
  • A non-toxic work environment - I knew going into my job that I was replacing a workaholic and that I was joining a workaholic. What I didn’t realize was that I was also expected to be a workaholic and anything less than killing myself was seen as laziness. Pay attention to the culture at your new job. Ask the docs what they do for fun or to relax and more importantly when the last time was they did that thing. If they don’t have any answers, they’re too busy. 
  • Diversity. This may just be me, but I went into family medicine because I get bored easily. I need variety of patient types and disease types and socioeconomic groups and everything else. I realized quickly in my practice that most of my patients were privately insured elderly white people. As in, the most boring demographic for Wayfaring
  • A Balanced schedule. I figured that when I joined a practice that had been established for 30 years that the workflow kinks would have been worked out and it would run like a well oiled machine. In reality I would have 8 physicals a day and 5 of my most complicated patients in hospital follow ups back to back, all scheduled for just 15 minutes. There has to be balance in the schedule. You have to be able to take a little extra time here and make it up elsewhere. 


What I want now: 

  • fair dolla$$$. In actuality, what’s fair is actually considerably more than what I was making in my first job. I was grossly underpaid, particularly considering this being a rural area where nobody wants to work (typically those jobs are paid much higher). It’s not about the bottom dollar value for me. It’s about compensating me in a way that is comparable to my peers. 
  • Colleagues who can be both friends and mentors. See above. 
  • Good benefits. Two years of no dental or vision sucks when your most expensive problems are dental and vision related. Life insurance and retirement plans aren’t something most 30 year olds think of, but they’re really important, and I didn’t have those to start with. 
  • A flexible schedule. The whole world doesn’t need to fall apart if I need to switch my regular day off or if I need a half day to go to the doctor. 
  • Administrative time. Preferably a full week day, but a half day is great too. I’m happy working 4 10 or 12 hour days a week to have one week day off to catch up on work I’m behind on or get my hair cut and get my taxes done and see my psychiatrist, you know?
  • Knowledgeable and helpful staff. I need staff who don’t perpetuate old wives’ tales and notions like “you need a zpack for that cold”. I need to work with people who will ask if they don’t understand something rather than just make something up and who can help me educate my patients. I need folks who are prompt and who can anticipate some needs. 
  • To not be responsible for other peoples’ paychecks. In private practice, if I take time off or scale back, the practice loses money and thus our staff lose hours or money too. The staff in my first job were horribly underpaid and I don’t like the idea of the entire burden of the practice’s finances hanging on my shoulders. Sign me up for that hospital-owned practice, please.
  • To not have to turn patients away based on payer source. This is a national problem and is definitely not limited to my first job. But my first job wouldn’t let me take Medicaid patients at all. It made it completely impossible for me to build any sort of pediatric or OB practice in our town. I don’t like the idea of turning away a patient because their type of insurance doesn’t pay as well. I want to just treat patients and not have to worry about their payments. Hello, single payer healthcare system. Get on it! Obviously I will still have to worry about whether my patient can afford their meds or whether their insurance will cover their meds, but I won’t have to pick and choose what patients I accept based on their payer source. 
  • To deliver quality, up to date care. To work with people who will back up my evidence-based decisions and not practice based on feelings and patient satisfaction. To work with people who will encourage me to learn more and do new things. 

There you have it folks. A lil summary of what I want, what you might want, and what I’ve learned in these first (almost) 2 years of practice. Here’s to better future jobs for us all!

anonymous asked:

What's your opinion on the theory that Dipper is treated unfairly throughout GF? For example, Dipper sacrifices a lot for Mabel, while she only seems to sacrifice her sock-puppet show for him. There are also many suggestions in the show that some episodes overlap, like that from July 11-15, Sock Opera, Blendin's Game and Into the Bunker overlap. Which means D was under a LOT of pressure that week and he sacrificed a LOT for his sister. But she doesn't thank him for that. What are your thoughts?

See, maybe it’s the big sister in me, because I’ve never understood this particular complaint. The fact is, Dipper loves Mabel so much that her happiness is his own; his actions of sacrifice on her behalf are freely chosen. That’s why Bill’s behavior in “Sock Opera” is so insidious; he builds on Dipper’s momentary frustration with Mabel (why won’t she help me?!?!) by bringing up the various ways he’s helped her in the past, implying that she hasn’t done much to return the favor. He seeks to engender resentment where there was none, where Dipper was previously unwilling to give him so much as a stitch of Mabel’s puppet show; hey, she worked hard on those.

The key assertion I have to address here is that “Dipper sacrifices a lot for Mabel, while she only seems to sacrifice her sock-puppet show for him.” I imagine that viewers come to the conclusion that Dipper has the losing end because, when they compare Dipper’s problems to Mabel’s, they see Dipper’s as more serious. Dipper has a crush he can’t shake (relatable), Mabel is gaga over a pig she just saw at the fair (less relatable); Dipper is pursuing the latest lead in his search for the Author (important), Mabel is rigging up an elaborate puppet show to impress the Boy of the Week (unimportant). Yet the show is always keenly aware that Mabel’s problems, as trivial as they may seem to us, are as important to her as Dipper’s are to him. Bill highlights this when he says, “Who would sacrifice everything they’d worked for just for their dumb sibling?”, causing Mabel to respond, “Dipper would.” Dipper’s “everything” is his investigation of Gravity Falls and Mabel’s “everything” is her puppet show, but each of their projects is everything. Coming from Mabel, the sacrifice of the sock puppet show–and, by extension, of a shot at the “epic summer romance” she’s been seeking as ardently as Dipper has been seeking the answers to his questions–is a very real loss, one she’s willing to accept because Dipper would do and has done as much for her.

Nor is Mabel’s puppet show the only casualty of her greater love for her brother; the loss of her dream world is no mean thing. Mabeland might not be to everyone’s taste (I would personally have thinned out the crowd and lowered the 80s club music a notch), but it’s Mabel’s ideal universe; it’s a world where everything is as she wants it, where she’s never bored or lonely, where every boy loves her, where the high court judge is a kitten. With the threat of change weighing on her and the most important relationship of her life under siege, the prison bubble presents Mabel with an irresistible retreat. Bill, who has banked on human greed in the past to great success, believes that the trap is inescapable, that no one handed all their heart’s desires on a plate will be capable of leaving (just as Mabel is taken in by her desperation to stop time, Dipper wavers when presented with the possibility of growing up on the spot). But without Dipper, all of it is hollow; she prefers in the end to leave her safe place and to follow him into an uncertain world.

For much of the show, Dipper is the more responsible one within the context of their relationship. Regardless of actual birth order, Mabel is the baby; sometimes the baby gets in a habit of relying on charm to carry her through, taking it for granted that her older siblings will always step up to the plate on her behalf, because she’s just that cute (looking at you, youngest sibling in my own family). But if Mabel’s occasional thoughtlessness with regard to Dipper is a character flaw, it’s worth measuring against the depth of her concern for the world at large, a quality that Dipper himself, who tends to value his select group, could stand to learn from. Dipper’s only real issue with the destruction of Northwest Manor and all of its visitors is that Mabel happens to be among them; Mabel is the first to see the potential for redemption in Pacifica, even though Dipper is the one who becomes close to her.

But Mabel loves Dipper more than anyone, and she is grateful to him for everything he does for her and shows it. She apologizes to him at the end of “Sock Opera” for letting a transient enthusiasm skew her priorities: “I spent all week obsessing over a dumb guy. But the dumb guy I should have cared about was you.” After escaping the prison bubble, she makes it clear to him that he can stay with Ford if he wants to–her noblest moment in the series, because Dipper is her entire world, infinitely more to her than crushes and pet pigs and magical trees that grow stuffed animals. He stays with her, not out of guilty obligation, but because he wants to be with her–because she’s his best friend, because growing up without her would be unthinkable. He’s a fair-minded guy, not one to take the fall without good reason–when he operates against her in “The Time-Traveler’s Pig,” he does so on the assumption that her pig is an enthusiasm of the moment and that his love for Wendy is permanent. When he realizes that losing Waddles will truly hurt her, he doesn’t hesitate. “I could never break your heart, Mabel.”

But look at how she thanks him. She knows this wasn’t easy for him and she’s ready to show him how much it means to her. She tackles him in sheer strength of feeling. She lifts him right off his feet.

Treated unfairly? Dipper gets back everything he gives away with interest. Dipper’s happiness is his sister’s happiness and he always gets it because he is her happiness. Dipper is a lucky kid.

A/N: This post was written posthumously, since this photo killed me obviously.
Also on: AO3.

xxx

“Hey.”

“Hey, stranger.”

“Sorry I haven’t come by sooner, I was…”

“Busy fending off a throng of reporters and being a full-time parent?”

“Yeah.” Oliver huffs a short laugh, stealing a shy glance at the ground, as all the weight of the day visibly slips from his shoulders. She likes him like this, more innocent and carefree, where it’s no longer Mayor Queen or the Green Arrow or more recently a worried Dad standing in front of her…it’s just him. Just Oliver. Just her Oliver.

“I won’t hold it against you. Come on in.”

She holds the door open for him as he steps inside, his arm carefully dodging her shoulder, but that doesn’t stop a thousand goosebumps from breaking out over her skin in anticipation. As she shuts the front door, Felicity steals a quick glance of her own at his back because wow. While she loves Suit Oliver in all of his various…well, suits, it has been ages since she’s seen Casual Oliver. And honestly, seeing him standing there in full-on casual black and that jacket that she swears is framing his jaw really well, looking so at ease in her apartment…what used to be their apartment…it’s bringing back a lot of old memories mixed with new, tingling hopes stirring in her stomach.

Oliver spins to regard her in return, wearing a strangely nervous look. It’s then that she notices the small box with a white bow in his hands. “I uh…I was gonna wait, but I just…” He sighs, pausing, watching her like he’s waiting for her to stop him. And when she doesn’t, he finally says, “I brought you something,” holding the box out to her.

“Oh. What’s this?” She takes the box from him, wanting to reach for his hand, too, but he pulls back before she can.

“It’s just a uh…a present.”

“I can see that. You know, it’s not my birthday for another several months,” she teases him with a smile.

He doesn’t quite smile back, but there’s a hint of mischief behind his eyes now. “I know. This is different.”

Felicity frowns at his serious voice, watching him cross his arms. Uh oh. She knows that move. He only does this when it’s something big, something important. “Okay.”

She hesitates, her fingers hovering over the lid, playing with the plastic bow. Her heart starts to hammer against the walls of her chest with a new ferocity, like it somehow already knows what’s inside.

Swallowing once, she finally lifts the lid and finds nestled on top of a cotton square…a silver key.

“It’s a key,” supplies Oliver, his voice sounding very far away and warped, like she’s suddenly trapped inside a fish bowl.

Felicity stares in awe at the little object shimmering in the dim lighting, calling out to her. Slowly, she picks up the key, feeling the cool, wonderful weight of her future pressed against her palm.

“I know we’ve talked about it, and you’ve met William, and he seems to really like you. And this doesn’t mean that you have to move out of your place or anything, I just think…”

His voice sounds much closer now, and she glances up to realize that he’s standing right in front of her, his hands finally reaching out to hold her shoulders, drawing her closer, drawing her home.

He licks his lips. “And if this is too fast then–”

“Oliver, are you sure?”

He sighs again, only this time it’s a gentler sigh, a contented sigh, a hopeful sigh. His gaze grows intense yet familiar, and oh she’s missed that look most of all. Even after five months of taking things slow, after being engaged to this man once, she’s still getting used to him looking at her like this–like she’s the only thing in the entire world that he wants. She’ll never be used to it. She couldn’t look away from him even if she wanted to. And she doesn’t want to.

“I’m sure of one thing,” he says, his voice so deep it sends a warm feeling straight down her gut. “I love you, and I want us to be a family. All of us.”

“Me too.”

Trapping the key in a fist, Felicity reaches for Oliver just as he lowers his head down to her. Thank you, she says through the kiss, her lips gently pressed against his, re-familiarizing herself with his taste. But Oliver changes the angle quickly, deepening the kiss, his hands coming up and around her, pulling her close, his fingers pressing deep into the muscles of her lower back.

Felicity feels herself losing focus, her grip around his neck loosening…. She fumbles in the haze but manages to set the little box down on the counter, freeing her other hand to join the one still tightly clasped behind his neck. Her fingers sweep into his hair brushing against his scalp.

Seconds seem to bleed into minutes, and she doesn’t know how long they stand there like that, holding each other, remembering and relearning and learning afresh what the other person feels like…

A loud clang startles her, and Oliver pulls back, breaking the kiss, though she doesn’t let him go too far.

Realizing she must have dropped the key, Felicity breathes against his open lips, “It’s fine. I’ll get it later.”

And then she kisses him again, openly, fiercely, desperately. This kiss is different than the one before, taking on a life of its own, like the one they shared in this very spot years ago, when they first moved in together. It feels right that they should find each other again in this way. Felicity clings to him, his body still so warm and solid and familiar. How is he always so warm?

After what feels like too brief a time, though, Oliver pulls back again, breathing heavily. He keeps his eyes closed, as he presses his forehead against hers. “Felicity,” he whispers. “Can I ask you a question?”

“If the question is can you stay the night, the answer is yes.”

He laughs, giving her a short and more chaste kiss. “Are you sure?”

She nods. 

“Besides,” Felicity nips his lips again. “I don’t expect to be staying here much in the future. We better make the most of it.”

So if my historical sources are telling me the truth…

…and I’m synthesizing the history properly…

…then, in fact, the entire edifice of Western civilization – all the cultural, social, and philosophical structures that define the world in which we live today – can be traced back to a stupid loophole in Roman inheritance law.

NOTE: Everything here is taken either from Francis Fukuyama’s The Origins of Political Order or from a Livejournal post by the Infamous Brad that I am currently unable to find.  I get credit for absolutely nothing, except noticing the connection between Section II and Section III. 

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

What kinds of scenes could I include in my story that would involve developing character relationships? I have this problem of having characters seemingly pop into the plot when the scene calls for it, but then they disappear for long periods of time, and these characters SHOULD be seen more often than they are. What can I do to involve my characters more?

Involving Minor Characters More

I will apologize in advance because this post is a bit metaphor heavy, but I think the metaphors really help in explaining the involvement of “minor” characters. So the question here is: How do I develop character relationships when one character only appears sporadically?

DON’T use the characters merely as “coffee breaks” from the main plot. 

If these characters are popping up routinely following major action sequences or plot movements, you might be guilty of doing this. Scenes like this are often seen as “filler” because they act as a reprieve from the intensity of the plot. These scenes are often stretches of dialogue that have no bearing on the main conflict of the story, and may even include bantering and humor. Scenes like this are often forgiven in stories because they serve to develop relationships between characters or even explore subplots or character backstories, but if your character is only popping up in these instances, then their presence starts to become awkward. 

Imagine you worked in an office, and all morning everyone is milling about, working hard, making deadlines. One worker finishes up a task and decides to take a coffee break and hits up the staff lounge. And regardless of when they take this break, every time they go in there, there’s some joker just sitting in a comfy chair, chilling out and waiting for the actual workers to come by and see them. 

This person engages the workers in mindless chatter to give them a break from the mental and sometimes physical strain of their jobs, and then when everyone goes back to work, they’re still just sitting there, waiting. Until someone else finishes up a rough assignment and comes by for a break. This whole setup is a bit odd.

These characters can still be part of the “coffee breaks” of your story, especially if the conversations they have help to define their relationships with others and explore their pasts. But for them to be important characters to your story, they should accompany the main characters back to the office, or at the very least head up to their own floor to do some productive work of their own. Otherwise they shouldn’t even be in the workplace (the story) to begin with.  

DO increase their involvement in the plot

What is the main conflict of your story? If you’re not sure how to answer this question, then work on figuring that out before you worry about how you’ll develop their relationships. They need to have reasons to interact, and if you feel as though you don’t have very many of those reasons as of now, then it’s possible that this disappearing character doesn’t have much stake in your story’s conflict. 

Think about all possible outcomes of your conflict - both the potential happy endings or sad endings, and then ask yourself how these outcomes affect this disappearing character. What is at stake for them? If they have no personal interest in what is going on with the main character, then you’ll want to give them a reason to care. Give them something to lose (or something to win, assuming a positive outcome). 

Think of it this way. If your story’s conflict were a sporting event, your main cast of characters should all be players on at least one of the teams. Your secondary, or minor, characters can be spectators, but they should have something at stake in the game, such as a bet on the outcome, or even just a strong allegiance to one of the teams. If they have a stake, they’re not going to just Google the score later. They’ll want to be there to see what happens, to yell their outrage or cheer their joy. To show their support, or possibly heckle the opposing side in hopes that they’ll screw up. 

Give them a motivation that’s related to all the stuff you’ve got going on in your scenes. If these disappearing characters are absent from many of the scenes, you have to ask why? If they’re not involved, then make them involved. Give them a role, or remove them from the story entirely. 

DO imagine their lives apart from the protagonist.

If you’re struggling to find a role for the character in the conflict, then try thinking about what they’re doing in all that time off screen. Brainstorm their own personal journeys. What are they working towards? What are their obstacles? Thinking about these questions in the context of the world or story universe you’ve created may trigger something that ultimately ties back to the main conflict. 

Thinking about this also creates some depth for your character. Going back to my very first example (our joker in the staff lounge), it’s possible that this joker is actually working while everyone is coming in and out. Maybe they’re tidying up, preparing snacks for everyone, working on projects in a notepad, making phone calls, or fixing a broken microwave or refrigerator. Maybe there’s more to this character, but we never know because they drop everything the moment a worker (or main character) stops by. 

And let’s keep going: imagine that this habit causes their work to suffer, because they’re sacrificing their own needs for the needs of the staff that come by seeking their company. How does that affect them, and can you think of ways to bring it to the forefront? Could the workers notice? Could the disappearing character disappear at a moment the MC relies on them to be there the most? What happens as a result? 

If you consider the character important enough that developing their relationship with an MC is of concern to you, then they should be important enough to work into the main plot in some form or another. 

I hope my lengthy metaphors were helpful! Good luck and happy writing :)

-Rebekah

You’re Next to Me in My Life

Rating: K+
Warnings: really fucking sad, dementia, alzheimer’s disease, NO character death dw
Length: 2333 words
Status: completed

Summary: sometimes phil forgets things, but dan is always there to remind him of their life together and how far they’ve come. 

AN: You can all blame @pretentiousdan for this one i want to fucking cry. also if there are any mistakes i’m sorry, i could only proofread it once. have fun lmao

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I am currently very tired so this probably might not even make sense in the morning but… 

I’m imagining a D&D minigame (probably lasts 1-2 hours tops unless you’re having fun with it) meant to break the ice for new groups, in which the DM controls an adventuring party and the players control NPCs as they naturally pop up. Specifically, it could help new players get comfortable with roleplaying without the pressure of sticking to a character they just made. If you do this before the character creation stage, then even better because they may stumble into a character they like acting out.

Rules that I’m just rambling out please forgive me if they are nonsensical: 

  • It’s all improv. Don’t break a scene to look up game mechanics like prices, or which checks to make, or what would give advantage/disadvantage. This is about the acting so if it’ll throw off the groove, make it up on the spot. It’s all about quick thinking.
  • No modifiers. You’re all making things up on the spot so if you have to roll something, don’t waste time justifying who would have what stats. You could even go without dice altogether. The d20 is just an optional element of chance here.
  • Mandatory introductions. I don’t care how goofy it is. state your name, race, class/occupation, a random character trait, and how their day’s been going up until this point. As many as you can off the top of your head. Go nuts because things get silly before they get really creative, in my experience. Note: Character voices are encouraged. For funsies.
  • Everyone participates in a scene. No pressure on how much they interact, but in each new setting, every player has to put one NPC in that tavern, shopping square, riot crowd, etc.
  • Plot not needed. The adventuring party strategically wanders in a way that builds a town/city/etc as the players make it up. The DM isn’t in charge of telling a story here, just keeping the energy of the improv scene going. This includes-
  • Leading Questions. This one’s the challenge for you, DM who likely already has a control complex and likes to plan out every detail of everything in their world because it gives them a sense of security. If anything, you are the one who most needs to be good at rolling with whatever your players hand you. For the sole purposes of making you uncomfortable, the newcomer adventuring party knows absolutely nothing about this town. Thankfully, the citizens know everything about it. Which is good because you need directions to find your way out of your rented hovel room let alone to the temple–oh that’s right. Who’s the patron there? You sure don’t know! Better ask someone! Get that DMs?? YOU KNOW NOTHING. 
    • Important: If the scene starts slowing down, it’s up to you to either encourage and interact with these townsfolk some more, or get moving somewhere else.

Example scene: order of NPC choice is determined by an initiative roll. 

DM: “Alright, so four adventurers walk into the tavern you’re in–”
Player 1: “Oh! I call the bartender.”
Player 3: “Aw… I had a bit I was gonna do.”
Player 1: “Okay, okay fine, I’m the owner of the tavern, Marcus McMuffin the half orc–stop laughing–and uh… I have a tattoo of a dwarf lover that literally no one else knows about? And my day’s been…hm. It’s been awful because I got stood up for a meeting. DM, I basically live in here, so I’d know they’re new, right? I wanna know if these guys look like trouble makers.”
DM: “The Barbarian’s flexing at anyone who looks in his general direction but other than him fancying a typical bar brawl, they seem decent–if lost.”
Player 2: “I’m the elven bard in the corner and I start trying to seduce the Barbarian with my beautiful voice!!”
DM: “Listen… you can’t just use your character from the last game. Cherry the Elven Bard would’ve totally seduced the barbarian but who are you now?… Nah it’s fine, dude. Take your time. We’ll come back to you.”
Player 3: “I’m the crazy old village drunkard who’s a human named Steve–”
Player 1: “I thought you said you wanted the bartender!”
Player 3: “–Who samples a lot of the wares and is thus the village drunkard! I said I was doing a bit, jeez! DM, I start rambling loudly at the strangers about something that sounds like one of those super infuriating sidequests–you know the kind–where you have to go through a lot of bullshit busywork and the longest fetch quest of your life but there’s a promise of GREAT loot at the end so you consider it anyway. You know what I mean? What do I do for that, roll deception? Persuasion?”
DM: “Nope. No rolls. Personally, I am so on board with this but I need you to make this speech right here and I need you to sell it.” 
Player 3: “Oh boy.”

If for some reason you want to try this please give me a rundown of how it went because I feel like it’s the perfect recipe for hilarious trainwrecks that come with all good icebreakers. (I feel like it’d be a fun drinking game somehow? But I don’t play enough to know how to work alcohol in in a reasonable manner. I’ll leave that one up to house rules.)

Taverns & Tanneries, never coming to a game store near you lmao

Edit: I just realized that when the group starts playing a real campaign, you can embarrass them by working their goofily-named NPCs in, keeping an entirely straight face while doing so. Watch as they squirm and laugh-cry over having to discuss the fate of the world with Marcus McMuf’an. If only they’d known. 

If only they’d known what was to become of Marcus McMuffin.

GoT S07E02 Thoughts


I am up at 2 in the morning for this shit and I don’t know how I feel about this episode. There was a lot happening and a lot not happening. But as always, here are my rambling, harebrained thoughts about the episode that may or may not make any sense whatsoever to anyone but me. Either way, here we go:

The scene with Dany and Varys continues to toe the line between Benevolent Hero Dany and Violent Conqueror Dany. I have never doubted Dany’s ability to care for the common folk. She is not an evil person; she has compassion for them, that’s always been clear from the start, but the question has always been, will her compassion win out over her desire for power? And this grey area feels really poignant in this scene with Varys when she’s pardoning him for once siding with another king who had tried to assassinate her.

While it looks like she’s showing him a great deal of compassion and demonstrating her desire to be loved by the people and bring peace to Westeros, I feel the conversation is actually quite foreboding. He’s already been by her side for awhile, so why was this conversation happening now? They could’ve easily cut this entire scene away and left us to continue assuming that Dany pardoned Varys when he arrived with Tyrion, but they chose to highlight it and have Varys give his whole speech about not caring who was king or queen of the Iron Throne and that his loyalty was to the people. This is important, as are these lines:

“If you ever think I’m failing the people, you won’t conspire behind my back… If you ever betray me, I’ll burn you alive.” 

Once again, Dany threatens people for their loyalty. In contrast, the previous episode when Jon Snow pardons Alys Karstark and Ned Umber for the crimes of their house, he says:

“For centuries, our families fought side by side on the battlefield. I ask you to pledge your loyalty once again to House Stark, to serve as our bannermen and come to our air whenever called upon… Yesterday’s wars don’t matter anymore. The North needs to band together, all the living north. Will you stand beside me, Ned and Alys, now and always?”

The difference between them is quite clear. One demands loyalty, while the other asks for it. 

And the focus of this scene with Dany and Varys being on how the people of Westerosi will receive her feels greatly foreboding and not in the good way for her. This scene was shot and chosen for a reason; this dialogue was written for a reason. And nothing in Game of Thrones is so black and white as this scene’s purpose only being highlighting how good and forgiving Dany is. 

Anyway, I know people will call me biased for reading the scene this way and perhaps I am, as I still believe Dany’s narrative is of a fallen hero, but these are just my thoughts anyhow. 

Moving on!  

What was interesting to me in the scene with Melisandre was how Dany’s face lit up when she thought the prophecy might be about her. Oh, and the line: 

“The prophecy belongs to me.”

Loosely translated to mean that the Seven Kingdoms belong to her. These people and their love belong to her. She is the one who was promised because it’s her destiny, her birthright. In direct contrast again, Jon reiterates in the same episode that he was chosen as their king, but he didn’t want it and he didn’t ask for it. 

The way Jon and Dany rule and see the world are literary foils of one another. And I feel like as the season progresses, the more this will become apparent. I also don’t like the implication of Jon bending the knee to Dany or to anyone, but we’ll see. 

Now back to Winterfell. The shot of children having archery practice while Jon and Sansa are atop watching over them is, as has been mentioned before, almost a direct parallel to Ned and Catelyn overlooking Bran’s archery lessons in Season 1. Like I’ve always said, nothing in this show is shot without a purpose, and it’s not the first time parallels between the two have surfaced. Whether it just means they’re supposed to be a formidable co-ruling pair in the North or a future marriage/romance between the two down the line still remains to be seen, but we all know what basket I’m placing my eggs. Both. The answer is both. 

Still, I really love the way Jon looks immediately to Sansa for her opinion on what to do with Tyrion’s request for him to come to Dragonstone. Considering last week’s episode, this is a good sign they’re learning to communicate better, and I think it’s also telling how he’s asking her for her opinion on Tyrion because as he says, she knows him better than anyone, when last week he was dismissing her despite her firsthand knowledge of Cersei. It’s growth. 

And actually I’m not going to go chronologically by scene now, so I’m going to skip ahead and address the moment in the Great Hall. When Jon says he’s going to accept Tyrion’s request to come to Dragonstone, he looks back to Sansa – yet another sign of him seeking her approval and support. But it’s more than that. The whole scene I kept noticing that even when Sansa wasn’t directly in focus and when Jon wasn’t looking at her, the shots of him more often than not had her in the background to his side. All of this really made them resemble a king and queen. This is only further emphasised by the following moment:

I’m leaving both [the people and Winterfell] in good hands.”

“Whose?”

“Yours. You are my sister. You’re the only Stark in Winterfell. Until I return, the North is yours.”

Sansa may not be by name, but she is his queen. I don’t even mean that romantically. Jon sees her as his equal partner with equal right to the kingdom (so to speak) as he does. She is his most trusted confidante. This is such an incredibly significant moment in their relationship. While Sansa’s learned to trust him fully, Jon struggled with reconciling the woman she has become and the girl he once knew, but this feels like a momentous step forward as it clearly shows he’s accepted the woman she is now and that person is someone he trusts. 

I also think Sansa’s immediate glance to Littlefinger is also important. She knows it as well. She is exactly where Littlefinger wants her, as the ruler of the North, as a queen, and we all know he wants to be her king. Sansa’s concern is therefore rightly placed. She may know what he’s up to, but he is still Littlefinger and as cunning as he is creepy. The question is, will she be able to outplay him? He is her proverbial beast to slay. 

Now onto my favourite scene: Jon choking out Littlefinger. I actually had to edit this back into this post because I wrote it on a different document and forgot to place it back in, but here we are. Look, this scene is everything. We don’t get a farewell scene between Jon and Sansa beside from Jon’s little awkward wave towards her and her wave back, which is, by the way, so adorable. I know we were hoping for a Weirwood scene (and #treebang) but considering how tentative their newfound relationship is, this fits. Awkward, adorable and completely filled with unspoken words. That’s Jon and Sansa right now. It makes sense, as much as I hate it. 

But instead of that, we get this scene: 

“I love Sansa as I loved her mother.” 

“Talk to my sister and I’ll kill you myself!”

The instantaneous primal reaction is just so fascinating to me. Jon completely loses his cool the second Littlefinger says he loves Sansa. He’s been fairly restrained up until that point. Such an instant reaction requires zero thought; it’s based purely on feelings and it’s evident Jon feels a primal and fierce need to protect Sansa. I don’t doubt he’d feel that way about Arya or Bran too, but there’s something so underlying about framing his fierce protectiveness over her after Littlefinger confesses he loves Sansa.

Take it what you will, but I got my shipping goggles on for this scene and I love it!

Back to the rest of the story, we’re given a scene of Cersei decrying all that Dany’s done. She talks about the murders and burning of those masters, trying to appeal to the Lords over how cruel and savage Dany is, which we all know is quite ironic considering she burned down an entire septa of people out of vengeance. Perhaps there’s a reason why we’re being led by this scene to compare Dany and Cersei’s actions. 

Either way, the reappearance of Randyll Tarly makes me extremely nervous. There have been quite a few speculations going around about how the Tarly will play a role in the upcoming season, or more specifically, how Dany’s dragons are going to end up killing all of the Tarly’s, including Sam’s mother and sister. Randyll’s appearance here and his subsequent scene with Jaime about where to place his allegiance seems to support this theory. The death of the Tarly’s will put Jon in a very precarious situation, especially if he bends the knee to Dany, which is a plot line I hate and loathe as it is so completely uncharacteristic for Jon – yet for the greater good, I could also see it happening as Jon is the most self-sacrificing numpty in Westeros. 

Speaking of Sam, I really hope he doesn’t die from treating Jorah. And also, why in the gods’ name do they keep giving Sam the most disgusting scenes? Seriously, that was so gross. I am curious though as to what role Jorah is supposed to play in the future and whether his being cured by Sam will have any significance, especially if he runs along back to Dany and she orders the kill on Sam’s family.  

Missandei and Grey Worm!!! 

Look, I know people are going to dismiss this entire scene altogether and say it was a waste of time because no one cares about these two, but you’re so wrong. I care. Maybe I’m one person out of a million, but fuck it, I care so much. There has to be a reason that recent seasons have started to flesh out Missandei and Grey Worm more and not just as characters who are unfailingly loyal to Dany, but as individual people. It’s been a subplot that’s been building for a long while and I don’t see why they would waste the precious time on a subplot for the sake of having some ‘romance’ between two of Dany’s most loyal subjects. What’s the payoff for that? 

I personally doubt they’re both going to survive this upcoming war and I think the loss will either drive a huge wedge between Dany and the surviving character or cause reckless behaviour that will turn a significant plot a different way. Either way, I think there has to be a payoff for building them up for so long. Or maybe it is just some silly romance made to satisfy the audience who are so the type to want romance in their show. 

Finally onto Arya! What can I say but YES SHE’S FINALLY HEADING BACK TO WINTERFELL!!! I was so worried for her going to King’s Landing just as the war was about to begin, especially if Euron is around. I couldn’t imagine her surviving if she did, but with Arya heading back home, I feel more at ease that she’ll survive the season for some time yet. But what killed me was her reunion with Nymeria. I practically squealed with joy then cried when Nymeria walked away, but what confused me was Arya saying “that’s not you” with a (if I’m not mistaken) smile on her lips. That was Nymeria, wasn’t it? And does she mean that Nymeria is not her pack, signifying Arya’s final journey back to her real pack (ie. the other Starks)? 

Also, can we please appreciate Arya and Hot Pie together again? I love that whole conversation about how she’d been baking. Made me chortle. 

Lastly, we have to talk about that final scene and my screaming thought of ‘what the fuck, Theon?’ because WTF THEON! I don’t know how to feel about that. On the one hand, as soon as I saw Euron attacking I knew he’d win, and considering how his actor said he’d make Ramsay look like child’s play, I was so worried for Theon and am glad he got away. But him abandoning his sister like that? It was so disheartening and sad to see. After how he helped save Sansa, I honestly thought he found that piece of himself again, but then it is a very unfair thing to say about a man who has been repeatedly tortured and abused. Although the Theon before Ramsay was a coward, so I don’t know. I just don’t know where his storyline will go from here on out. 

But speaking of Euron, I just knew his gifts to Cersei would be people and I am so bloody worried about Yara, Ellaria and the last remaining Sand Snake. I hate how weak the show continues to make them look and I hate that we’re about to witness more brutality done upon women on this damn hell show. I couldn’t stomach Ramsay with Sansa and I really doubt I’ll be able to stomach the upcoming scenes with Euron and these women.

Anyway, these are my thoughts. So sorry it’s so unbelievably long and rambly. What did you guys think?

weedstoner-archive  asked:

that post u made reminded me that i have a communism question for u. so whenever i talk about it with my friends they always ask me what a communist society would look like, how there would be jobs without money, etc and up to a point i can explain it but i quickly lose confidence once they ask about details like. in terms of who would do the "dirty work" aka the jobs ppl don't want, how would u "buy" things without money, that kind of thing. i know theres prob not a simple answer but ya

a moneyless system is easy to explain. you dont work for money in the current society, you work for the goods and services that money purchases, but it is not the thing that provides your electricity. power isn’t generated by how much cash they can funnel into the furnace. get rid of money and the exchange-value system for the much simpler use-value system that is already in place. if someone argues that people will consume inefficiently, then theyre suggesting that capitalism is somehow more efficient by throwing away billions of pounds of food per year and refusing to shelter homeless people just because they can’t afford it. we have the technology to produce a surplus of basically everything and market mechanisms as we understand them would generally be made unnecessary in any realistic model of human consumption (many capitalists like to come up with absurd quantities of such-and-such commodity [10,000 gallons of water per day, for example] being consumed by one obnoxious person that ruins communism for everybody else, as if thats actually a problem worth a serious investigation)

communist society can’t be drawn up and pointed at like “this is it” because its the future. we can provide a rough framework for how it could function based on how our current society is able to operate (like above when i said that we currently produce a surplus, so we know for a fact that people could be provided for in the future) but we won’t know what problems may arise in the future until we get there. this is absolutely something that can seem disheartening, but for people that are so goal-oriented that they will settle for the current conditions just because they dont want to go through the work of building a better society, they are generally privileged to the point where they dont understand the necessity of radical change. they aren’t the ones suffering every day, so its easy for them to dismiss something that seems like a lot of work, even if its the only chance of survival for a large portion of the population.

the dirty work thing is an easy enough argument to dismiss when you’re well-equipped with the knowledge to do so. it often takes the form of the doctor-janitor story, where a doctor shouldn’t be paid the same as someone that simply takes out the trash, but this is a misunderstanding (and actually quite a funny one. they couldn’t have picked two better professions to compare tbh because its so easy to refute). doctors are certainly important to a (literally) healthy society. they are the people we go to so that we dont get sick and die. janitors are considered the lowest of the low because they dont actually do anything besides mopping or whatever (???), but imagine a world without janitors (or perhaps a world without their function is a better way to put it). without them, we would all get sick and die, same as a world without doctors. all of the dirty countertops in the world would make us all rush to the doctors office as we caught each others illnesses (a funnier thing to think about is how the market would react by suddenly producing a large amount of doctors to meet the demand of sick people, essentially reducing them to just another profession, removing the elitism that surrounds them. this is actually similar to doctors in the early days of capitalism. they were no better than the local trader, butcher, etc because all of them were important to the well-being of the population).

its important to understand this because this is actually similar to the old marxist feminist argument that women’s unpaid labor (in the home) is just as important as mens paid labor (in the factories). this is perhaps a little dated in some ways since capitalism has directly included women in the process of production, but before that, [the western concept of] gender was a clear-cut system of labor, where men produced and women reproduced, both in the sense of reproducing children [again, in terms of western concepts of gender, not actually getting into trans politics here] and also in the sense of reproducing labor. by taking care of the husband and her family, the sole duty of the housewife, she was responsible for the commodity producer (and the future generation of commodity producers and labor reproducers), and by extension, production as a whole. if it weren’t for this process of reproduction of labor on the microscopic level, the production of commodities wouldve been impossible, and this remains true for the doctor and the janitor, two very different jobs that fulfill the same basic purpose: to keep society going. to argue that one is more deserving of pay because one requires more “skill” than another or that one requires more education than another isn’t actually a criticism of socialism, but a realization of the cruelty of capitalism, where only those with enough wealth can afford to educate themselves and sustain their wealth (not to mention that this completely ignores the absurd fact that healthcare is a profitable industry, which it shouldn’t be).

one of the easiest ways around this argument though, especially if you want to get more into what communism would probably look like, is to just say that most of these things would be automated or taken care of on a community level. healthcare could be almost entirely abolished if we were to get to a point where we didnt have competition and the profit motive preventing us from finding cures for diseases just because companies make more money from selling monthly prescriptions than they ever would by actually stopping illnesses in their tracks, and for many other cases, machinery could be introduced in the emergency room (as is already done today) to make the doctors job easier. i think its safe to assume that janitorial work would also benefit from the introduction of machinery into the cleaning process and this work would become less stressful and more accessible to the general public.

(also, on the job question, id be a bad commie if i didnt quote the bit in the german ideology where marx says “… in communist society, where nobody has one exclusive sphere of activity but each can become accomplished in any branch he wishes, society regulates the general production and thus makes it possible for me to do one thing today and another tomorrow, to hunt in the morning, fish in the afternoon, rear cattle in the evening, criticise after dinner, just as I have a mind, without ever becoming hunter, fisherman, herdsman or critic.”)

so there you go. hope that helps.

the will of the stars

☾ a story written in fate

pairing: yoongi x reader

genre: soulmate!au, coffee shop!au

word count: 2.8k

warnings: none

author’s note: I really enjoyed writing this one! I haven’t written a soulmate fic before, I might even turn this into a full-length fic sometime after I’ve written a few more drabbles ♡ please enjoy!

Originally posted by sugagifs

You associated a few things with the boy who sent you cryptic messages through the stars.

First, a bundle of Christmas lights, many of which were broken. Second, a shower of soft pink rose petals. Third, angry swearing. Fourth, an ethereal grin that illuminated the universe.

Min Yoongi, a complete stranger, liked to talk to you. He had enjoyed it for three years now, since his voice first flitted through your mind. And though he may have been insufferable at times, an utter nuisance, you loved it when you heard him murmur a quiet hello.

You did not know why your minds were linked. There was no warning when it happened, no explanation, just a new voice that had frantically demanded who you were. You had no influence over what he said, you took no part in his actions; he was simply a part of you, for some reason that you could not fathom.

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This is why I’m at peace with Episode 12 

Part 1 of 2 - Katsuki Yuuri’s journey

I have a friend who was somewhat disappointed with the ending of Season 1 of YOI, so I’ve written a full analysis on Yuuri and Victor’s motivations and goals.

It’s lengthy, but I hope it does help some of you feel more satisfied with what happened in Episode 12. Yuuri and Victor will have separate posts.

Click here to read Part 1 - Yuuri’s analysis.
Click here to read Part 2 - Victor’s analysis.

(And I am really sorry about the length of this, guys. There is a KEEP READING cut beneath this paragraph, but I know sometimes phone apps ignore them. I apologize in advance that tumblr doesn’t always recognize its own coding.)

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radical-bears  asked:

So proud of Danny in the Defenders... He was my favorite. His fights were a huge improvement from his show, I loved them all! What do you think about Danny this season?

    Danny was a rockstar in this show. As Daredevil bloggers, we’re contractually obligated to say that Matt was our favorite… but well… we loved every second of Danny’s journey, and the wait for Season 2 is going to be very long indeed. We really enjoyed the fights in Iron Fist, but we agree that they were awesome in The Defenders– particularly with the addition of those glorious Luke/Danny tag-teams! If you don’t mind, we’re going to take this as an excuse to do a deep dive into Danny’s Defenders arc.

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anonymous asked:

I wish you would write Aizawa coming out as trans to yamada

sorry this took so long, i kept getting interrupted by people coming home

Title: Quiet

Words: 1,700+

After Shouta was done, there was silence.

They sat together on the brick riverbank, Shouta sitting cross-legged, Hizashi swinging his legs over the edge of where they sat, his shoes flashing in the reflection of the water as he swung his feet back and forth. The world was mostly quiet, the only thing breaking that silence being the city moving softly around them. The cars behind them sounded distant. The people further along the riverwalk were far away. Even the pigeons chirping and cooing were far enough behind them that Shouta was easily able to drown them out with his anxiety.

Hizashi didnd’t say anything at first. He kept swinging his legs. Back and forth, back and forth, and Shouta actually appreciated the pattern, rather than being irritated by it. He closed his eyes for a moment, counting the number of times Hizashi’s tennis shoes hit the brick riverbank, colliding with the hard wall with a soft thump before continuing on. Again and again, and Shouta breathed out, finding the sound calming, despite the words he’d just said and the nerves that have opened a deep, black hole in his chest.

It would’ve been worse if Hizashi was completely silent, he thought. A lot worse. But Hizashi still sat beside him, swinging his legs back and forth over the riverbank, and when Shouta opened his eyes, he saw Hizashi looking at him with wide, curious green eyes.

Shouta felt his face heat up, as if it was on fire, and he ducked his head into the scarf he was wearing, hoping to hide his face a little more. He slouched over, turning to stare down at the water, watching the reflection of Hizashi’s constantly swinging feet in the ripples there. The water was calm and fairly clear, the weather around them a little cold for this time of year, though Shouta was fine with that, given that it was a proper excuse to wear a baggy, oversized sweatshirt and a scarf.

Hizashi still said nothing, still just swung his legs, and finally, Shouta looked back at him, drawing his bottom lip between his teeth, his voice coming out a little more forceful than he meant it to be, “So—?”

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irrelevantwhitegirl  asked:

UR GREASER AU IS GIVING ME LIFE

okay so my original post about this was way too short for my liking and i’ve changed some things now that i’ve discussed it more with zoe and jen buckle up boys we’re in for a bumpy road (also these pics are so greaser!tom it physically hurts me)

  • greaser!tom is the epitome of bad boy with a heart of gold
  • his dad left when he was seven so he’s always been the protector of his family
  • his two younger siblings (adam, 15, and penelope, 13) look up to him so so so much
  • total momma’s boy oh my lord
  • he’s super super smart and loves to write but he pretends not to be and doesn’t try very hard in school
  • partly bc he has a reputation to uphold
  • but partly bc he knows his mom can’t afford to send him to college and it’s easier to pretend that college isn’t something he wants or could qualify for than it is to let her feel like she’s letting him down
  • works as an apprentice mechanic at his uncle’s auto shop
  • he knows that he’s going to inherit the shop when his uncle retires 
  • he wants so much more than what he has and wants to be so much more than what he is?????
  • but he’d rather be what everyone assumes he is if it means giving his family a better life
  • does he want to be the leader of the town’s most infamous gang??? no
  • but the position gives him status and fear and the ability to protect his family
  • and it doesn’t matter to him if that protection comes at the cost of his safety
  • his mom doesn’t know he’s in a gang
  • to some degree she does??? she suspects it???? but he tries his best to keep his injuries hidden from her and dodges questions when she asks about his black eyes and bloody knuckles
  • adam doesn’t come home one day and tom drives around for hours until he finds him in a park nursing cuts and bruised knuckles and tom just about loses it
  • “do you think fighting makes you cool? i swear to god adam if i ever get another frantic phone call from mom because she doesn’t know where you are you will never step foot outside this house again”
  • “i know you’re the leader of a gang tom how can you tell me not to fight when it’s all you do?”
  • “adam it’s too late for me to be anything else but it’s not too late for you.”
  • he teaches penelope and adam how to fight bc he wants them to be able to protect themselves but he also teaches them to use their heads and focus on school
  • carries a switchblade but has never used it on anyone
  • penelope is the only person (besides you) that gets away with calling him tommy
  • his entire family loves you
  • adam is low key in love with you and penelope thinks you’re so cool
  • tom’s mom thinks you’re good for her son and you help him focus and stay calm
  • his uncle is hesitant bc he knows how snobby your family is and thinks you’re the same
  • you and tom work so well bc each of you is what the other needs
  • he makes you feel reckless and adventurous and you make him feel more important in the world like his existence matters
  • your family is not so supportive
  • the first time tom meets them he shows up to dinner in an old suit and tie that his dad left behind
  • hair combed nicely
  • flowers for you and your mom in his hand
  • your mom thinks he’s sweet and your little brother thinks he’s cool but your dad hates him
  • he’s very passive aggressive and takes little shots about tom’s family life
  • eventually you have enough and you storm out with tom in tow
  • you can calm him down and he calms you down
  • and you both know that your relationship has an expiration date
  • but when he slips his jacket around your shoulders and pulls you into him as you watch the stars from the roof of his car you pretend that this can last forever
  • you’re the only person he’s ever shown his poetry to
  • i know that spoken word poetry definitely does not fit the fifties aesthetic we’re going for here but this poem ruins me every time and i want to hear tom recite it
  • tom knows that you’re going to end up with someone so different than him and he’s so scared that he’s going to end up like his dad
  • but when you kiss him it feels like he could steal the moon for you

i made myself sad whoops

Auston Matthews (Request #2)

Request: Can you write an Auston Matthews imagine where you’re a figure skater who hates hockey and hockey players because they seem cocky and are constantly sleeping around but then you meet Auston and you don’t know he’s a hockey player and you guys hit it off. Then after a while he tells you he’s a hockey player (after the whole while you’ve been dating, you’ve complaining about them). Sorry if this is confusing but TIA.

A/N: Uh, so IDK about this one. I just don’t know if it works or if it’s crap. I’m sorry. I hope it isn’t crap and that it is somewhat what you were looking for.

Also, I couldn’t for a life of me think of a title. 

Word Count: 1320

Warnings: Cursing


The level of hate you have for hockey players is unreal. They think they own the freaking ice or something. Nothing was worse than trying to practice and dealing with hockey players leaving the rink. Except maybe when you were leaving and they were coming in.

“Great. The ice will be shit today.” You heard one of them say as you walked past. “It’s not even a real sport.”

You just shook your head and bit your tongue. It was useless to even try to fight. They weren’t smart enough to hold a conversation. You made your way to the coffee shop on the corner.

“Caramel macchiato, soy and a blueberry muffin.” You placed your order. You pay and turn around, bumping into the person behind you. “Oh, sorry.”
“It’s alright.” He replied. You sidestepped him and picked your drink up. Finding a seat was easier than normal. There were actually open tables for once.

“Can I sit here?” You look up to see the guy you ran into. Confused you nod your head yes. “Great, thanks.”

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The temptation to hang

This entire chapter is actually filled with temptations.The chapter title is “One Will Hang”, which is an obvious reference for the hanged man. We see one of the hanged mans acting as a major tempter in this chapter alone. 

Since the chapter is deliberately named the hanged man, and also this point in the manga parallels right around where the hanged man arc began in og tg, it’s possible to read this chapter with the lens of the hanged man tarot card as well as the moon. 

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Thoughts on OUAT S7 regarding Killian and Captain Swan.

I’ve been meaning to write something up about this for a while, as the hate has become overwhelming and certain individuals are being rude towards those who are remaining positive on season 7. Frankly, I’ve lost any will to not get involved. Here are my thoughts for those who care.

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Buffy’s “Empty Places”: Deconstructing Merit, Luck, and Betterment

Anyone who’s spent five minutes with me knows that I love ranty metas, and Buffy’s “Empty Places” is something I’ve wanted to tackle since I finished it. However, rather than try to unravel the entirety of that shit-show conversation I want to focus in on what Anya says near the end.

You really do think you’re better than we are. But we don’t know. We don’t know if you’re actually better. I mean, you came into the world with certain advantages, sure. I mean, that’s the legacy. But you didn’t earn it. You didn’t work for it. You’ve never had anybody come up to you and say you deserve these things more than anyone else. They were just handed to you. So that doesn’t make you better than us. It makes you luckier than us.

Here Anya lays out three important questions that I think are crucial to interpreting the Buffyverse.

  • Did Buffy “earn” her power? 
  • Is she “luckier” than her friends? 
  • Is Buffy “better” than her friends? And what exactly does “better” mean in this context?

Honestly, I still stand amazed that Anya can even voice the first two questions among Buffy’s friends and not get immediate, wicked backlash. Admittedly her use of “luckier” could be interpreted to mean “randomly,” but her word choice is still significant. Buffy is by no stretch of the imagination lucky. Does her calling give her purpose? Yes. Does it give her cool superpowers? Absolutely. But none of these benefits are free gifts—they’re balanced, even outweighed, by her responsibilities. This calling means that Buffy has no other options in her life, no career or family as a ‘normal’ person would experience it. Her powers are to keep herself and others safe, not to have fun with. Buffy didn’t win the freaking lottery here, this life was forced on her.

Originally posted by btvsmemories

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