'i am african'

(Susie) You know, I've been trying to figure out what to call myself for the longest of times.

I decided to do some reading up on it because I received an asks asking me if I was first generation/second generation.

I really did not know how to answer this because although I was born in Zambia. My mother moved to America when I was 2 years and I moved when I was 2 ½ years old. I have been raised my entire life as an American. I found my answer and it certainly puts me at ease to know that their is a term and hopefully others who feel the same and are having identification issues due to early immigration.

(ME): “Children who arrive in their early childhood (ages 0 to 5) are referred to as 1.75 generation immigrants since their experiences are closer to a true 2nd-generation immigrant who was born in the Country they live in: they retain virtually no memory of their country of birth, were too young to go to school to learn to read or write in the parental language in the home country, typically learn the language of the Country they immigrate to without an accent and are almost entirely socialized there.”

“The term 1.5 generation or 1.5G refers to two types of people. Individuals who immigrate to a new country before or during their early teens (Asher 2011). They earn the label the “1.5 generation” because they bring with them or maintain characteristics from their home country, meanwhile engaging in assimilation and socialization with their new country. Their identity is thus, a combination of new and old culture and tradition.

Depending on the age of immigration, the community where they settle, extent of education in their native country, and other factors, 1.5 generation individuals identify with their countries of origin to varying degrees. However, their identification is affected by their experiences growing up in the new country. 1.5G individuals are often bilingual and find it easier to assimilate into local culture and society than people who immigrate as adults. Many 1.5 generation individuals also, become bi-cultural, combining both cultures - culture from the country of origin with the culture of the new country.“

Reached a new follower milestone last night! When I started this blog I never thought this many people would enjoy it, yet here you all are! Everyone on here has always been so kind and supportive, you truly make the whole blogging experience so much more fun. Thanks for sticking with me and most importantly, the animals! <3

But that’s not all: the blog will turn 5 years old next month! To celebrate, I’m thinking of doing something like a giveaway again (I’m open to suggestions), it has been a while and this seems like a good excuse to do something fun! So keep an eye on the blog in the upcoming weeks!

Research:Large to Small Scale, Avoiding Homogenizing East Asian Cultures, & Paralleling Regions Appropriately

I’m currently working on a project set in a secondary world, but with nations that roughly correspond to major cultures in our world. 

By that I mean I’m trying to create amalgamations of cultural groups. For example, one country corresponds to Germanic cultures, one to Celtic, one to Mediterranean. There are, so far, also countries that correspond to Eastern Asia - a mixture of Japanese, Chinese and Korean, mainly - South America, “Arab countries” and so on. My first question, in that regard, would be whether or not this concept - creating a “vibe” that reads Eastern Asian, for example, but is not one specific culture - is offensive and if it is, what I can do to solve it. 

The project I’m working on makes use of so called FaceClaims, which means that, for example, actors are used to represent fictional characters. If I based the country on China alone, then I could only use Chinese FCs and would thus greatly limit the representation. A solution I thought of was to have each country be inofficially split up in itself, so the “East Asian” country would have a “Chinese” region, a “Korean” region and so on.
Secondly, I have a desert region that I thought would be nice for an “African” (I am very much aware that there is no such thing as an “African culture”, so bear with me) cultural group. For this “country”, I thought of a loose union between different nations of people. There, I’m stuck - should I choose one region in Africa, let’s say West Africa, and base each nation on one specific peoples there? Or should I create my own “African-inspired” cultures? Or should I choose cultures from all around Africa and base a nation on each?

My third question goes along a similar line: The “cultures” I have chosen for the countries are by far not all there are in the world. There is no country for Native Americans, for example, none for South-Eastern Asians (unless I integrate them with my “India”), no Central Asian, etc. I know it is impossible to include all cultures there are in the world, but how do I choose which ones to represent in a concept like mine? I don’t want to exclude them, but I simply cannot create as many countries as there are cultural groups.

One possible solution I thought of specifically refers to Jewish people, since I feel it is important to represent them more in fantasy writing. My current idea was to have their story go similar to that of our world: Exile, long travels, and a split into groups, one of which would be the Ashkenazim, living somewhere near the Germanic country, and the other would be the Sephardim, which I imagined to live in between the “Arab” and “African” country, in a semi-autonomous city-state. But is it offensive to adapt what happened to the Jewish people in a secondary world or should I make it so that they have a more positive past and life, no exile like there was in our world? As far as I know, the exile is an important part of Jewish identity and cultural understanding, but I thought I’d ask anyway.

I’m going to preface this that some of this wording might sound very harsh, but I recognize you are genuinely asking out of a place of respect but you just aren’t sure what the best way to respect the world’s diversity is. The problem is it’s still not quite respectful enough, and shows sometimes glaring ignorance of nuances in the region.

I would also like to remind people that just because your exact question hasn’t been answered to the full scope you’re looking at, doesn’t mean you can’t get an answer as a whole. For example, we’ve discussed the concept of how and when to mix different cultures in the East Asian tag. Shira will cover your questions regarding Jewish representation below. 

However, I’m going to specifically tackle this from a research and worldbuilding perspective, primarily talking about a history of forced homogenization and how to avoid recreating colonialism/imperialism.

Notes on Language and False Equivalences

For starters, basically all of these groups are too broad. By a long shot. Either they flatten sometimes dozens to thousands of cultures (“Native American country” is in the thousands, “West Africa” is in the hundreds, “China, Japan, Korea” is in the dozens, if not hundreds, same deal with India). This language use makes people pretty uncomfortable, because it implies that the basis is stereotypes. It implies you haven’t done research, or, at least, haven’t done enough. When discussing nuance, it’s best to imply you understand there is nuance— like you did with Africa and Jewish culture, but neglected to do everywhere else.

You also go very broad with all non-European cultures, but narrow down a general homogeneous part for your European analogues, by picking Germanic and Celtic.

This double standard is something that is exactly what we try to draw attention to at WWC: to our ears, it sounds like “I’m taking Germanic peoples for Europe, but I’m going to mix three East Asian countries because those two regions have the equivalent amount of sameness that I can pass it off.”

While that sounds specific to just you, it’s not. We’ve received this type of question dozens of times in the past and it’s a general cultural attitude we’ve faced lots and lots and lots of times. Western society makes you think the equivalence is equal, because they’ve flattened all non-European countries with the single broadest brush, but it’s not.

I would also caution you on relying on media images for face claims, because media images only represent the idealized version of beauty. We’ve written multiple description guides that point out how much variety exists within all ethnic groups and how people seeing us as all the same is a microaggression.

You are right that you can’t tackle all of the world’s diversity into your worldbuilding, because, well, there is so much. The core of your question is basically how to narrow it down, which is what I’m going to tackle.

My suggestion is twofold: 

  1. Research big, top level things, over a few centuries— namely, keep track of empires that have tried to take over places and look at what groups Western society lumps together when it spreads multiple regions.
  2. Build small with a focus on a very specific place and group— namely, pick the smallest possible region you can and see what you have to build from there.

Researching Big

Researching big helps you catch what not to flatten, or at least, where flattening might be reinforcing situations that a government perpetuated. I’m going to focus on East Asia since that’s the bulk of your question, and it’s also where I’ve spent some time worldbuilding. The principles apply to all groups you’re trying to research.

East Asia— namely Japan, Korea, and China, although that is an oversimplification itself— is composed of two empires: China and Japan. This makes homogenization extremely risky because you’re touching two nerves of countries trying to take over in very recent history.

China has taken over a very large swath of land over centuries, and still has independence fights to this day from their recent history. As a result, they have both a roughly overreaching culture because the empire is so old, and a very fractured culture with over 50 recognized ethnic groups. When you think of “Chinese” you usually think of the dominant Han Chinese, but because of its old empire roots you can get a giant variety. In modern day, some provinces have kept their individual culture, while others have been part of China for so long there is a general “sameness” to them that can capture the flare you want.

Japan’s imperialism is similarly recent, only ending in 1947, and it left wounds across the Pacific (including Korea, China, Taiwan, the Philippines, and Malaysia). Many of their actions are classified as war crimes. They’ve also erased their own Indigenous population by insisting only one ethnicity lived in the country. Both of these factors make mixing Japan into an “East Asian” mix tricky. Japan’s culture, while heavily impacted by China and Korea, is pretty distinct because of its island status.

Big research also lets you see the neighbouring areas at a time borders might not have been the same. For example, in the 1600s, China was much smaller because the Manchu External Expansion hadn’t happened yet. As a result, places we now think of as “Chinese” actually weren’t, and you’ll have to account for these differences in your worldbuilding. You can determine this by looking up historical maps/empires, which might require book research (libraries are wonderful).

This does not mean you can ignore recent history, however. Because the story is set in modern day, people will be viewing it through a modern lens. You need to research both the modern and the historical context in order to understand how to go about crafting a respectful world.

So that’s stuff you would’ve discovered by big research. By tracking empire movements, you can see where old wounds are and what historical contexts exist within whatever region you’re pulling from. If you take North America, you can see how each individual tribe is cast aside in favour of settler stories; in Africa, you can see how multiple empires wanted to plunder the land and didn’t care who it was; in the Middle East, you can see both the recent military involvement, the historical Ottomans, and the historical Persians.

Build Small

You can also see what empires influenced their regions for long enough to create a similar-ish culture throughout multiple regions, which can help you extract the essence you’re looking for. I would add a very large caution to only do this for historical empires where those who suffered under the regime are not fighting in present day/ have living memory of it (such as incorporating too much of England, France, or Spain in the Americas, along with the two examples above).

Now you can build small. If you wanted to give a sense of, say, coastal China with a heavy amount of trade, you can pick a major port city in China and figure out the pluralism in relation to that city. What parts identify it as Chinese (architecture, governance, food, general religious practices— folklore changes by region, but the general gist of practices can remain similar enough to get a vibe), and what parts are borrowed from a distinct enough culture they’re noticeably different?

By going from a city level, you can imply pluralism by throwing in asides of differences “out there” that shows you’ve thought about it, without cramming your world full of cultures you can’t fit in the plot. You can then also narrow down what to include based on map proximity: if there’s an easy sea or land path to an Egyptian analogue, you’re probably going to at least hint at it. This is a known historical trade, btw. Egyptian blue and Han purple are made of similar substances, pointing to an ancient cultural link.

You can research this by simply googling the country and looking under its history in Wikipedia. If you look up “China”, you can see “Imperial Unification” as one of its history points. “Japan” similarly gets you the Meiji period. Turkey shows the Ottoman empire. You can also look up “empires in [region]” that will give you a similar overview. This even works for places you don’t think have historical empires, such as North America (the pre-colonization section notes several).

This also is a starting place for what the borders would’ve been during any given time period, and gives you places to potentially factor in military involvement and recent strife. This is where modern research comes in handy, because you can get an idea of what that strife looked like.

Hope this gives you an idea how to go about worldbuilding a diverse population, and how to avoid paralleling recent wounds. 

~ Mod Lesya

Regarding Your Jewish Characters

I think it’s valid to reflect our real history in fantasy although if you dwell too much on the suffering aspects and not the “richly varied cultural traditions” aspects you’ll probably lose some of us because suffering-porn written from the outside gets old fast (if you’re Jewish yourself you 200% have the right to write this, of course.) Human Jewish characters living in pockets in fake-northern-Europe and fake-Mediterranea and fake-North-Africa (or even Fake China and Fake India; we’re there, too) is actually injecting some well-needed historical accuracy back into a genre that’s been badly whitewashed, gentilewashed, etc by imagining a Europe where nobody but white gentiles existed until they conveniently popped into existence during whatever era the writer thinks is appropriate.

In other words, if your fake Germany has a Jewish neighborhood in its largest city, that’s a way of making pseudo-European fantasy more realistic and less -washy, and is overall a good move, despite the fact that the destruction of the temple is the reason we were in Germany in the first place. (I mean… it’s not like you’re planning on sitting there writing about Tisha b'Av itself, right? You don’t have to say “And the reason there are Jews here is because a bazillion years ago, we wound up getting scattered” just to have Jews.)

By the way, having myself written secondary-world fantasy where entire countries, plural, get to be majority-Jewish, and 100% free of on-screen antisemitism, I think both ways are valid.

–Shira

my procrastinatin’ ass is doin’ archive moodboards again

it went really well the last time and it even made a couple of people happy which is GREAT. i didn’t do all of them bc of personal reasons but i’ll try it again! 

if you want one:

  • reblog this post
  • it’d be super duper cool if you were following me too!

Originally posted by roobascooba

3

Happy Blackout!!! The top photo is in honor of the  50th anniversary of the founding of the Black Panther Party of Self Defense. The last picture was taken at the opening of the African American of History and Culture’s opening where Public Enemy, Living Colour, and The Roots performed. (Jacket by Reformed School). (Photo creds in order : @jamesjuly@36chambersof-oldirtybae, Paul Holston) (also I wear the jacket more for historical relevance than for gender)

A powerful image of Tyson Beckford, taken from Keep A Child Alive’s ‘I Am African’ ad campaign series. The black and white images, featuring models and celebrities smeared in different colours of paint were intended to depict 'a moving picture of modern African identity’. Well, I would say that this one, as with the others, certainly do just that.You can never argue with a photographer working on a project with a good cause. So good on Michael for taking this on. This image was sourced from Men’s Life.Tistory.com.

I am such an African beauty not to be cocky but I am so proud to be African everyday my skin just glows with or without makeup, my accent is one of the most amazing voices you would love to wake up too and I grew up learning how to cook omg I am such a queen and I just thank GOD for the amazingly beautiful parents he sent me too #lemonade

Ig Zainab _zamani This my only tumblr
South African TV Watcher Problems

I feel the need to rant. 

As some of you may know, I am a South African. And as a South African who watches a whole lot of American TV, I have developed a pet peeve against having South African characters showing up in American TV shows because I can count on my one hand the amount of times they’ve gotten the accent right.

So, for those of you who don’t know, South Africans do not sound European, German, Dutch, or Australian, which are the accents normally given to South African characters, and it really greats my cheese. 

South Africans have many unique accents, and they rarely ever actually get heard when South African characters show up on American TV (I don’t watch much British TV so I can’t speak for them)

Now, don’t get me wrong, I know South African accents are difficult, but it is not impossible to learn how to do them. 

For those of you would like to hear what a South African accent really sounds like, you can find them here:

> Leverage s01e01 - Gina Bellman is amazing and her South African accent in this was so well done, I almost thought she was South African.

> Captain America: Civil War - Dear, sweet Chadwick Boseman did such a good job with his accent when he played T’Challa, and John Kahni, the actor who played King T’Chaka is a South African man, you can’t get an accent better than that.

> Avengers: Age of Ultron - When Andy Serkis showed up on screen as Ulyesses Klaue and opened his mouth a legit thought I was listening to a South African man speak. Imagine my surprise when I found out that he wasn’t one! Guys, I have not heard a better South African accent done by a non-South African than I what I heard coming from this man’s mouth.

> Voltron Legendary Defender S02E03 - Bet you guys weren’t expecting this one. Yes, my fellow Voltron fans, when you hear Ulaz speak, you are indeed listening to the voice of Arnold Vosloo, another South African man. Hearing his voice made me so happy, especially since he did not hide his accent as I have heard so man *cough - Charlieze Theron - cough* actors and actresses do.

So, there you have it people, don’t trust every South African accent you hear on screen, chances are you will be hearing some other accent.

@rangergirl3

ps: this was brought on by the addition of Doctor Becker on Chicago Med. She is supposedly South African. Her accent suggests that she lied about where she comes from coz it sure as heck ain’t South African

smh gcoc (1/?)

NOTE: These are headcanons that we as a network came up with together are from our Discord #headcanons channel, recorded here as written by us in the chat, which is why they may sound more like chats/conversations than headcanons as headcanons are typically written. Check out our other headcanons here!

  • Shitty and holster are always the ones to ruin it. Lardo and ransom never live it down in the SMH group chat of color
  • SMH GROUP CHAT OF COLOR OH MY GOD WHY HAVENT WE TALKED ABOUT THIS BEFORE

Keep reading

ID #71080

Name: Zofia
Age: 18
Country: Poland

Hi, I’m Zosia. That’s the polish form of Sophie. I turned 18 few months ago and it really makes me sad :( I live in Poland but I’ve lived in Germany and Brazil (kind of weird, I know). I’m interested mostly in music ( all kinds because I write reviews, but personally I listen mostly to hip-hop, indie music and recently I felt in love with brazilian/african music), books - my favourite writers are Witold Gombrowicz and Herman Hesse. I like Sylvia Plath too ( typical tumblr girl, right? ). I love art, all kinds of it but I’m not really making anything by my own simply because I have no talent. The only “art” I do sometimes is writing short stories and poems but I never publish them because in my opinion they suck. I LOOOOVE tv series - all kinds, I’ve watched almost entire Netflix I swear. My favourite one is Twin Peaks and Mad Men. I like watching movies but only in cinema cause I get bored watching them at home easily and it usually ends up with me switching between tabs instead of watching a movie. I love pets especially dogs! I have a dog myself. In the future I would love to live in Italy or Spain. Australia is good too haha. I love travelling escpecially with my backpack, touring around the country. As much as I would want to write here I think that’s enough. My life maybe not very interesting but I’m a kind, nonjudgmental, open-minded girl so I think the letter exchange with me would be nice.

Preferences: I prefer people from Europe, mostly anyone aged 16-22.