'gunnel

youtube

(via https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMHR2_4oumU)

House Guests ‎– 28821, 28822 - Released in 1971.
House Guests ‎– My Mind Set Me Free.
Bass - William Earl Collins.
Guitar - Phelps Collins, Jr.
Drums - Frank Waddy.
Trumpet - Clayton Gunnells.
Saxophone - Robert McCullough.

youtube

(via https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=meHP4b6Ysfk)

House Guests ‎– 28821, 28822 - Released in 1971.
House Guests ‎– My Mind Set Me Free.
Bass - William Earl Collins.
Guitar - Phelps Collins, Jr.
Drums - Frank Waddy.
Trumpet - Clayton Gunnells.
Saxophone - Robert McCullough.

Late Friday night, the world was hit with the news that Muhammad Ali had passed away at age 74. “The three-time World Heavyweight Champion boxer died this evening,” family spokesperson Bob Gunnell said in a statement. Ali will be remembered as the greatest boxer who ever lived, as well as one of the most captivating and outspoken superstars in sports history. Today, tributes to The Greatest flooded the Internet from around the world.

See more.

Whenever the weather would permit, the ship’s company were allowed to bathe alongside, in a sail suspended from the fore and main yard-arms. We had on board a valuable Newfoundland dog of great size: Boatswain was not only the pet and delight of the middies’ berth, but equally enjoyed the goodwill of the whole crew; the animal richly merited the affection and attentions showered upon him. His station, while the men were sporting in the water, was always on the gangway, couchant, with his fore paws over the gunnel, and his head so far advanced that he could obtain a clear view of all that was passing under him. Did the cry for assistance reach his ear, Boatswain would instantly distinguish it from the hubbub of the multitude, prick up his ears, jump overboard, and swim to the person who appeared to require his assistance…This noble quadruped had saved many lives. Whilst lying in Hamoaze, a shore-boat pulling athwart the ship’s hawse in a strong ebb tide, took the cable amid ships, and was upset: he was overboard in a moment, and succeeded in saving a woman and a man.
—  James Scott, Recollections of a Naval Life (quoted in Jack Tar, Roy and Lesley Adkins)

Muhammad Ali, the man considered the greatest boxer of all time, died late Friday at a hospital in Phoenix at age 74. He was battling respiratory problems.

He died of septic shock related to natural causes, with his family at his bedside, according to family spokesman Bob Gunnell.

Ali inspired millions by standing up for his principles during the volatile 1960s and by always entertaining — in the boxing ring and in front of a microphone.

Cassius Clay (Ali’s given name) won a gold medal at the Rome Olympics in 1960. He wanted more: a professional heavyweight championship. He arrived in Miami in October to work with legendary trainer Angelo Dundee. Dundee, who died in 2012, recalled the first day Clay showed up.

“Bounding up the steps of the Fifth Street gym, and the steps were pretty rickety, you know, all wood. Bouncing up, he said, ‘Angelo, line up all your bums. I’m gonna beat 'em all,’ ” Dundee said.

More reading about Ali’s life:

Boxer Muhammad Ali, 'The Greatest Of All Time,’ Dies At 74

Muhammad Ali, The Boxing Poet Who Inspired Liquid Prose

President Obama’s Remembrance Of Muhammad Ali

Photo: Kent Gavin/Getty Images

“Back in the 30’s, I used to go to summer camp in Maine. Those were the happiest days of my life. There was a great freedom. I rode horseback, walked in the woods, went swimming, made new friends.”
“What was your happiest moment at camp?”
“One time I won a tennis match and got 50 points for my team. The whole camp was divided into two teams: Green and Tan. And we competed all summer long to see which team could get the most points. And 50 points was a really big deal! To give some perspective– you’d only get ten points for riding on the gunnel of a canoe.”