'gaelic'

Hello, fellow Langblrs! I thought I might as well do an intro to help others get to know me better.

About me:

  • I go by Cali
  • I’m 17/Class of 2019
  • ISFP
  • Born + live in America
  • Cis female (she/her)

Languages:

  • English (fluent)
  • French (Intermediate - I’m putting this one on hold for the moment)
  • Irish Gaelic (extreme beginner)

I hope to put more on this list eventually! Some “maybe one day” languages for me include Cherokee, Chickasaw, Navajo, perhaps Russian…I’ll see what languages I can find.

Interests:

  • Singing
  • (Irish) dancing
  • Reading
  • Gardening

Langblrs I especially enjoy so far (I’m new to Langblr so the list will grow):

@penguinlang @langblrnet @lovelybluepanda @languageloveaffair @gaeilge101 @langblrisntarealword @fractalrainbow @polygotpunk

5

Cramond Falls and Old Cramond Bridge, North West of Edinburgh - July 2017

The River Almond (Scottish Gaelic: Abhainn Amain) is a river in Lothian, Scotland. It is 28 miles (45 km) long, rising at Hirst Hill in Lanarkshire near Shotts and running through West Lothian, draining into the Firth of Forth at Cramond, Edinburgh. The name Almond/Amon is simply old Celtic for “river”. The river has a good example of an ox-bow lake near Almondvale West at Livingston.

I feel like every time I look at the fourth picture there are somehow more ducks.

To say there is no worth in learning a language that isn’t economically useful is like saying there’s no point in being friends with somebody unless they’re going to help you get a better job. It’s a spectacular, cynical miss of the point.
— 

Rhona NicDhùghaill, “Don’t Neglect the UK’s Indigenous Languages

The whole article is great, but this quote is especially stellar. 

HeyO! This was a bit of something I’ve wanted to do for awhile. Had it in my mind to do an Irish/Celtic/Gaelic/Welsh/Scottishwhathaveyou guide for awhile. Finally got around to it, at the very tail end of summer. So here goes.

Aos Sí: Irish term meaning “people of the mound”, they’re comparatively your faeries and elves of Irish mythology. Some believe they are the living survivors of the Tuatha Dé Danann. They’re fiercely territorial of their little mound homes and can either be really, really pretty or really, really ugly. They’re often referred to not by name, but as “Fair Folk” or “Good Neighbors”. Never, ever piss them off.

Cat Sidhe: Cat Sidhe are faerie cats, often black with white spots on their chests. They haunted Scotland, but a few Irish tales tell of witches who could turn into these cats a total of nine times (nine lives?). The Cat Sidhe were large as dogs and were believed to be able to steal souls by passing over a dead body before burial. Irusan was a cat sidhe the size of an ox, and once took a satirical poet for a wild ride before Saint Ciaran killed it with a hot poker.

Badb: Part of the trio of war goddesses called Morrígna with sisters Macha and Morrígan, Badb, meaning “crow”, was responsible for cleaning bodies up after battle. Her appearance meant imminent bloodshed, death of an important person, and/or mass confusion in soldiers that she would use to turn victories in her favor. She and her sisters fought the Battles of Mag Tuired, driving away the Fir Bolg army and the Formorians. In short: total badass.

Merrow: The Irish mermaid. They were said to be very benevolent, charming, modest and affectionate, capable of attachment and companionship with humans. It is believed that they wore caps or capes that would allow them to live underwater, and taking a cap/cape of a merrow would render them unable to return to the sea. Merrow, unlike regular mermaids, were also capable of “shedding” their skin to become more beautiful beings. They also like to sing.

Púca: Also called a phooka, these are the chaotic neutral creatures of the Irish mythos world. They were known to rot fruit and also offer great advice. They are primarily shapeshifters, taking a variety of forms both scary as heck and really really pretty. The forms they took are always said to be dark in color. Púcas are partial to equine forms and have known to entice riders onto its back for a wild but friendly romp, unlike the Kelpie, which just eats its riders after drowning them.

Faoladh: My all-time favorite Irish creature. Faoladh are Irish werewolves. Unlike their english neighbors, Faoladh weren’t seen as cursed and could change into wolves at will. Faoladh of Ossory (Kilkenny) were known to operate in male/female pairs and would spend several years in wolf form before returning to human life together, replaced in work by a younger couple. They are the guardians and protectors of children, wounded men, and lost people. They weren’t above killing sheep or cattle while in wolf form for a meal, and the evidence remained quite plainly on them in human form. Later on, the story of an Irish King being cursed by God made the Faoladh a little less reputable.

Dullahan: Dullahan are headless riders, often carrying their decapitated cranium beneath one arm. They are said to have wild eyes and a grin that goes from ear to ear, and they use the spine of a human skeleton as a whip (What the WHAT). Their carriages were made of dismembered body parts and general darkness. Where they stop riding is where a person is doomed to die, and when they say the human’s name, that person dies instantly.

Gancanagh: An Irish male faerie known as the “Love-Talker”. He’s a dirty little devil related to the Leprechaun that likes seducing human women. Apparently the sex was great, but ultimately the woman would fall into some sort of ruin, whether it be financial or scandal or generally having their lives turn out awful. He was always carrying a dudeen—Irish pipe—and was a pretty chill guy personality-wise. You just don’t ever want to meet him—it’s really bad luck. 

  • Them: *beautiful altars, offerings, hella spells, festivity, celebrating on may 1st*
  • Me: *eats one grape for breakfast on may 2nd whilst sat in my pj's, unwashed and doing no magic*
  • Me: blessed beltane everyone :^) 😊
LANGUAGE LEARNING TIP

I have been watching television/listening to music in my target lang as part of my immersion™ and I have found that, instead of focusing really hard on hearing a couple of words I know, it’s better to just relax and let the words flow.

For me, it’s a really hard habit to break. But if you just try it, you will start to hear words and phrases that you know and you aren’t missing further info that you would have if you were still stuck trying to translate the word you recognise. You will find that as time passes, the words will translate almost automatically.

Don’t focus. Just watch/listen. Like you do in your native lang.

A conversation I had with an atheist friend:

Them: “So, you believe in a mighty sky wizard?  You?”

Me: “No.”

Them: “Oh, good. I-”

Me: “I believe in a trickster sea wizard, a poetic blacksmith goddess, a trio of bloodied, prophetesses and a highly skilled, porridge-loving, well endowed god.”

Them: “…alright then.”

Me: “They say hi.”

Three Elements Home Blessing and Protection Ritual

Supplies:

  • Incense, or Sage Bundle - for smoke cleansing, to cleanse and protect with the “Sky”
  • Purified Water in a small bowl (optional ingredients include salt or herbs) - for saining, to cleanse and protect with the “Sea”
  • Protection Salt and Herbs (I’ll be adding lavender for peace and purification, and rosemary for protection and remembrance) - for protection of doorways, windows, and portals - to protect with the “Land”
  • Chant, Spell or Prayer of Intention - This step is best if you make it yourself, with your magical paradigms. Here is mine - “By the power of elements three, by the power of land, sky, and sea, I cleanse and protect this home to keep us safe from all harm.”  I also have one for each element e.i. “By the power of the sea, keep harm away from me”.

Ritual:

In an empty house, or apartment, open all doors and windows, including closets, bathrooms, etc. Start at what is to be the heart or center of the home, (the hearth, the bedroom, the living area, kitchen, etc) walk walk the perimeter of the home clockwise. If you wish to banish all spirits, spirits that mean you harm, all entities, whatever it is- do so at this time. Once you set your protections, you may accidentally banish or piss off ‘people’ you want to be friendly with. Walk the perimeter and focus on all the good memories you want to make here, the creating that will be done here, the hospitality you will offer guests, etc. 

Sky - Come back to start and light your “Sky” representation. Walk clockwise, chanting your spell. Aim the smoke at the ceiling, walking the perimeter of every wall and every room, including in closets, and around the shower, following the line of the ceiling. (not cupboards in the kitchen, because you might not be able to get the smell out later). Think of the smoke as banishing any previous tenants memories, bad emotions, spirits or energies you don’t want in your new home. End at your predesignated heart of the home.

Sea - Take your bowl of water, your “Sea”, and start again. this time dip your fingers into the bowl and flick water all around, aiming at the floorboard. Chant while you walk clockwise, focusing on the protection of the salt and water, creating a white light around your home as you sprinkle the water. Alternatively you can add to a spray bottle and spray the water. If you wish, sprinkle or ‘paint’ the water around any openings - mirrors, drains, windows - to protect from unwanted entrances for spirits or energies.  End at the heart of the home.

Land - Now take your “Land” representation of salt and herbs, and walk counter clockwise. Chant your house blessing or the chant for salt if you wish (if you chant the salt blessing, do one more pass clockwise saying you final home blessing). Sprinkle salt in a line across any doorway or window to outside the home. The salt should stay on the window sills if possible. The salt can be swept up from the front door if you wish, just ‘paint’ some salt water instead, after it is swept up. Sprinkle some around drains as well, and across wall mirrors. This closes up any magical or physical doorways of outside influence. End back at the heart of the home.

If you have a backyard or patio, you may want to extend the protections out there as well. Use cascarilla powder (powdered eggshells) around any dirt or lawn you have, use pure water with no salt, and maybe use wind chimes or a bell to represent the sky instead of the smoke, if you wish to not arouse suspicion. Please don’t use salt on the land. Its bad for plants and snails.

Home Protection Cont. :

I will be setting up my home altar at this “heart of the home” and from there it will be an easy place to renew the protections. I would recommend renewing the protections once a year, or whenever you feel you need a little extra boost of protection or cleansing. Since you originally did this when no furniture was in place, renewing the protections may seem hard. I prefer to smoke cleanse so that is a little easier for me, just say a protection or cleansing spell at our home altar and walk clockwise around the house with your smoke. Its gets into all the tight spots, now that there is furniture in the way, easier.  The spray bottle works well for this as well. I would recommend renewing one element at a time, in place of all three. 

Don’t forget that other protections are still great to uses as well. I will also be hanging my witches’ ladder made of hag stones by the door for protection, having potted plants for cleansing and protection like lavender, and hanging some wind chimes to know when the Good Folk are near.

Originally posted by butteryplanet

The last step is to enjoy your protected and magical home!

This or That - Langblr edition! ☆

Duolingo or Memrise? Class or self-study? Movie immersion or music immersion? Learning a few languages or just one language at a time?

Romance hoe or Germanic hoe? Japanese or Mandarin? Egyptian Arabic or Morrocan Arabic? Italian or French? Irish Gaelic or Scottish Gaelic? Swahili or Zulu? Latin or Ancient Greek?

Celebrating Lughnasadh:

Lughnasadh, also known as Lúnasa, Lùnastal, Luanistyn or Lammas, is a Gaelic festival of the first harvest, which also corresponds with other European early harvest festivals. It is held on the 1st of August, halfway between the Summer Solstice (Litha) and the Autumn Equinox (Mabon).

The festival is named after the Celtic god Lugh, and part of the festival is often offering some of the first harvest’s bounty in gratitude, and feasting or athletic competitions. Historically, journeys to sacred wells or holy shrines, or climbing mountains or hills have been popular, and in some places are still observed. Lugh is often seen as a personification of the first harvest, or the corn itself, and he is sometimes recast as folkloric figures such as John Barleycorn.

 Lughnasadh colours: gold, orange, yellow, green, light brown

 Lughnasadh crystals: amber, citrine, aventurine, peridot

 Lughnasadh foods: Bread, corn, soup, root vegetables, berries, mead, rice, barely, nuts, seasonal fruits, roasted meats, honey, beer

 Ideas for Lughnasadh celebrations:

  • Bake bread! Baking bread is one of the most traditional ways of celebrating this festival, and the first of the grains have been harvested. Consider baking different types of loaves, experiment with plaiting the dough or drawing designs on the top. Add seasonal berries, nuts or seeds to the dough to add flavour and interest
  • Have a picnic with friends and family – with lots of bread!
  • Go on a walk up a mountain or hill, or visit a sacred place such as a shrine, holy well, stone circle or burial mound (or just somewhere sacred to you if none of those are available)
  • Play games with friends or family, have a sports contest such as a running race or a tug of war
  • Make a donation of food to your local food bank or donate money to a charity
  • Hold your own Lughnasnadh ritual, light a fire and offer some food to the god Lugh and thank him for your harvest, and feel gratitude in knowing that all your efforts are coming to fruition
  • Make corn dollies, instructions for lots of interesting designs can be found online, or make sculptures and decorations out of salt dough
  • Light a candle and make a list of all that you are thankful for, and meditate upon this
  • Go on a foraging trip, look for early apples, plums, berries and edible fungi (ensure you are certain of what you are harvesting before you eat it!)

A blessed Lughnasadh to all, however you chose to celebrate it, and may your August be fruitful, prosperous and full of joy :)