'devil's day'

5

A ‘What If’ scenario that wouldn’t leave my head. I really doubt anything like this would ever happen, but what if Bendy and Boris had really different points of view on the whole studio and what happened there. Boris willing to forgive, forget, and move on, and Bendy…very much the opposite of all that!

So if Henry started working together with Boris things could get bad…really fast. With how irrational I usually think of him, Bendy would probably feel quite betrayed as well.

3

It’s still April 1st where I live, so I decided to translate some of my favorite series from the April Fools Day Rejet Friends~ Please excuse my poor editing skills lmfao

Edited/Translated: noirliesl

**Please do not repost my translations anywhere**

I feel like there must have been a time, somewhere in the past decade, that Sam and Dean ended up doing rock paper scissors and then when they were about to throw, Dean whipped out the finger guns while Sam threw rock and then just smirked and said, “Colt—dusts anything,” all proud of himself.

And then somehow the game evolved and eventually they ended up playing Rock-Paper-Scissors-Colt-Lucifer-Sam Fucking Winchester or something. And obviously Lucifer trumps the Colt and but Sam Fucking Winchester overpowers Lucifer, so. And then eventually it’d just get way out of hand and they’d have to go back to the good old-fashioned way, but that wouldn’t keep either of them from throwing some random-ass thing every once in a while, just for kicks.

Date: So what are some of your hobbies?
Me: Well….

Today (06.06.17) marks the 73rd anniversary of Operation Overlord, the Allied invasion of Normandy.
On June 6, 1944, more than 160,000 Allied troops landed along a 50-mile stretch of heavily-fortified French coastline, to fight Nazi Germany on the beaches of Normandy, France. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower called the operation a crusade in which, “we will accept nothing less than full victory.” More than 5,000 Ships and 13,000 aircraft supported the D-Day invasion, and by day’s end, the Allies gained a foot-hold in Continental Europe. The cost in lives on D-Day was high. More than 9,000 Allied Soldiers were killed or wounded, but their sacrifice allowed more than 100,000 Soldiers to begin the slow, hard slog across Europe, to defeat Adolf Hitler’s crack troops.