😞😍

Funny facts about the Icelandic language

I get A LOT of questions about Iceland and what it’s like living here. So today I have decided to not answer any of the useful things I could tell you and just make a big shitpost about the Icelandic language. 🔆

Pika- Okay. So keep in mind that Pikachu in Pokémon quite commonly says pika. Like a lot. Pokémon is/was on TV here just like most other countries. Okay so, wanna know what píka means in Ielandic. Vagina. Not even kidding a little. ⚡️🐱

Bra- No, bra does not mean anything related to underwear of any kind. According to us, it’s the sound that ducks make 🦆

Hjúkrunarfræðingur- I know you’re probably thinking that this must mean something very smart and complicated. Nope. This unneccessarily long ass word just means nurse. Yep. 👩🏻‍⚕️

Strætóstoppistöð- another unneccasserily long word. Simply means “bus stop” 👐🏻

Leðurblökumaðurinn- In almost every country in the world Batman is just called Batman or something very similar. Yeah.. we didn’t get the note. Leðurblökumaðurinn it is. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Kind- it does not mean anything related to kindness or any other emotional expression. It means sheep. And according to us it does not tell you “baah” it says “me”. If it happens two times it makes “meme”. Isn’t that just wonderful? 🐑

Geirvarta- it means nipple. The weird thing is that it is made from two words “Geir” which is a pretty common male name here, and “varta” which means “wart”. Imagine if the word for nipple would be “JasonPimple”?! Poor Geir..

Not language related but: we have an app here where you bump your phones together to see if you are related before you have sex with someone. You may have heard this somewhere before but I am here to confirm that this is true. There are only 300.000 people in the entire country so accidental incest is very much a possibility. ⚠️

In Iceland we don’t have just one Santa, no,we have 13. And yes they bring you small gifts each of the thirteen days leading to christmas, but they also are known for stealing hot-dogs and candles, eating all your skyr (fancy yoghurt), slamming doors, and other not so bad but mildly annoying things. But their mom is a hideous troll lady that lives in the mountains and eats children. Yikes.. 🎄💀

We have at least two letters that no other country in the world uses: ð (capital Ð) and þ (capital Þ) and also other rare letters that are only used here and in other Scandinavian countries: ö (Ö) and æ (Æ).

To make the sounds of Ð and Þ put your tongue between your teeth and blow. Softly for ð and hard for Þ (should sound like Th in Thor/thing/thunder/etc)

Hope you enjoyed 🤜🏻🤛🏻

Why does English still have the “TH” sound?

The interesting thing about this topic is that English is one of two languages of the Germanic family that has retained the feature commonly called the <TH>-sound which stands for the dental fricatives /θ ð/. If you have a look at the map below which highlights the Germanic tongues in red, only Icelandic and British English (from England, Wales, Scotland + Northern Ireland) in darker red sport these sounds. It is also fascinating because there was a time when the ancestors of all these tongues had dental fricatives but lost them over the last centuries.

Then, why did English maintain a sound that was lost in almost all its sister-languages despite centuries of evolution side-by-side?

Grimm’s Law

First, you have to understand that on the whole, Germanic languages phonetically stand out from the rest of the Indo-European languages for a set of processes that made original IE sounds move one step closer towards fricatives. These evolutions were named Grimm’s Law, after Jacob Grimm discovered this phenomenon in 1875. This is a brief summary of what happened during the splitting of Germanic away from common IE:

This translates into these instances:

  • Greek: Podos/ Latin: Pedis/ Sanskrit: Pada vs English: Foot/ Danish: Fod/ Gothic:Fotus.
  • Greek: Tritos/ Welsh: Trydydd/ Russian: Tretij vs English: Third/ Old Saxon:  Thriddio/ Icelandic:  Þriðji.

There are many more examples but the most relevant here is of course the change of alveolar/dental stops /t d/ into the dental fricatives /θ ð/. This is the first steps in explaining the presence of dental fricatives in English. They descend from a millennia-old process that saw these sounds develop in all Germanic languages.

Verner’s Law

When Grimm’s Law was accepted, a new problem arose; some words clearly didn’t fit within the frame hypothesised by Grimm. For example, Proto-Indo-European pa’tēr turned into father instead of the expected fader while PIE ‘brahtēr gave brother like Grimm’s Law predicted. The alternation can also be found in different forms of verbs. So of course, Grimm must have missed something. It turned out that the solution lies in the change of accents in Proto-Germanic. While stress was relatively free (meaning rather unpredictable) in PIE, PG stress shifted and was placed on the root of the word. The evolution of the phonemes did not affect the consonant if it was word-initial or right behind a stressed vowel. The evolution of these consonants are illustrated in the table below:

This is the reason why PIE /t/ became [θ] and then [ð] in PG for *fadēr while *brōþēr remained untouched. This event helped increase the number  of instances of dental fricatives in Proto-Germanic. But it still doesn’t account for English dental fricatives. Be patient.

High German Consonant Shift  

A new phenomenon took place in the southern dialects of German in the 5th century that consisted in a large-scale shift in the consonantal system. By the mid-5th century, Old English had already been brought to Britain and thus remained utterly unaffected by these changes whose relevant features are the following:

  • θ > d
  • β > b
  • ð > d
  • ɣ > g

As you can see, the dental fricatives evolved into stops and were consequently lost in the phonology. The HGCS was not restricted to German as certain elements can be found as well in Dutch, Low German and Scandinavian Germanic. Probably under the influence of German in the following centuries, Danish, Norwegian and Swedish lost their own dental fricatives as there were multiple and intense cultural and linguistic exchanges between German and “Scandinavian”.

While English, isolated geographically from the rest of Europe and from Germanic influence because of Roman and Norman Conquest, kept /θ ð/. It’s interesting to note that Britons did not have as much as Romans and Normans the inclination to write. Manuscripts by monks may have helped bring a certain standardisation to the language.

Two additional and contradictory phenomena took place in Middle English where /d/ changed to [ð] and /ð/ to [d]. This is why fader changed to father and murðer changed to murder. The sequence of /d/ + unstressed ending -er triggered its evolution to [ð].

In short, dental fricatives appeared in Proto-Germanic via Grimm’s Law and Verner’s Law and Old English managed to maintain [θ] and [ð] because it left the continent before the effects of the High German Consonant Shift could be felt. Its geographical isolation (being on an island) certainly helped protect the relic of the Germanic legacy.

I saw once that Welsh may have had an influence on the upholding of these sounds since both languages had them. However, Latin and French were much more powerful influences on English but that did not impact the keeping of the dental fricatives so a foreign language influence is not really believable. However, French might have contributed to the phonemisation of [ð]. Before French came to Britain, /z v ð/ were only the voiced allophones of /s f θ/. By introducing new graphemes for sounds that were not “official” in English, it turned them into unquestionable elements of the phonology of English.

Isolation may be the biggest driving force on the upholding of these sounds since Icelandic, in a relative similar position, is the only other Germanic language with dental fricatives.

Further reading:

High German Consonant Shift

Grimm’s Law

Verner’s Law

Icelandic Phonology

Abelle Voice Demo
JordantheCat11
Abelle Voice Demo

Exclusive to Tumblr

Okay, I know I said I was gonna take a break from voice acting, but after seeing this post that @the-vampire-inside-me made earlier of Abel’s genderbent form, I had to do a quick voice demo for her.  And honestly, this was very fun to do.  The remaining lines I read were from this comic here, inspired by my good friend, @jamesdijit, who voices Abel on his channel (he’s my canon voice for Abel, by the way, lol).

Hope you like this, Vampire!  Thanks for giving me an excuse to make a female voice for Abel!  XD

Bendy and the Ink Machine © theMeatly
Abel the Rebel Angel © @the-vampire-inside-me
“Abelle” © Vampire and @zenoxfurryman (Can’t tag you for some reason.  Sorry dude.  :/)
Thumbnail © Vampire

A Basic Guide for Pronouncing Icelandic.

This is a subject that I frequently post about, and yet its basics have yet to be properly discussed. This post will help you to achieve familiarity with the Icelandic language, both in terms of written characters and their respective sounds. This guide may also be used as a method for pronouncing Old Norse. It is a lengthy guide, but that is because Icelandic, in all its beauty, is a bit difficult for most people to pronounce. In the end, this quite is only “basic” because it does not delve deeply into the linguistics behind certain sounds involved. Nonetheless, this guide should provide to be very helpful!

When working through this guide, try to avoid becoming overwhelmed. I strongly recommend working through only one section at a time.

Keep reading

Quick Note on Pronunciation

Þ, þ = soft “th,” as in “thorn,” “thought” or “thistle.” Usually rendered as “th.” Present in Thórr (Þórr) and Thrúðr (Þrúðr).

Ð, ð = hard “th,” as in “the,” “that” or “themself.” Can be rendered as “th,” “dh,” or just “d.” Present in Óðinn, Iðunn, Njörðr, Skaði, Víðarr, Auðumbla, Höðr, Móði, lots of other things…

random things i’ve learnt about old english as a complete beginner. 

  • the language was used by germanic inhabitants of england around 5th-11th century
  • also called anglo-saxon; different from the language of the saxons in germany
  • there are 3 dialects of old-english (west saxon, kentish and anglian)
  • the alphabet was adopted from the latin one by christian missionaries 
  • spelling wasn’t really a thing
  • everything was recorded phonetically (by-sound)
  • (this makes translating a bitch but you can legit see the change in dialects and accent through time and region!!!)
  • the sound ‘th’ has two different letters thorn (Þ, þ) and eth (Ð, ð)
  • ash (æ) is used for elongated vowels like the a in fast
  • >80% of the 1000 most used modern english words originate in old engligh but only >50% of the 1000 most used old english words can be found in modern english
  • ‘there’ is one word found in old english but it’s spelt ‘ðǣr’
  • it’s an inflected language
  • meaning sentence structure is very loose and relies on variations of a word to get abstract meaning across
  • there are LOTS of variations for each word (ughhh that’s going to be tough to learn)
  • it’s just as, if not MORE confusing then modern english

anonymous asked:

I was thinking about Richard and lo and behold a minuet later he posts a video (his face, he's having fun and loving his job) and I truly think he's managed to turn Instagram into a weapon because he's murdering us with that chest hair. Was kinda afraid to admit I love his chest hair. Thought it was sorta taboo. But apparently not. Celebrate that wonderful man's chest hair (and all of him)! He said posting so much my heart is going into overdrive. Him on the trampoline and diving! ðŸ˜ðŸ˜ðŸ˜©ðŸ˜©ðŸ¤¤ðŸ¤¤í ½

I share your sentiments.  I don’t think there is anything wrong at all with loving chest hair.  I’m glad he’s been so active on IG, loving his job and just seeming real happy lately.  It’s lovely to see.

anonymous asked:

Hi there!! This may be a strange question (and if it makes you at all uncomfortable, please ignore it), but could you possibly describe what romantic love feels like? I realized (happily) that I was asexual years ago when my friends described sexual attraction to me and I realized that it was a mercifully foreign concept. Recent events have raised the question that I may also be aromantic, so I'm trying to crowd-source a description to see if I recognize it. Regardless--sending best wishes!ðŸ¦‹ðŸ¦‹í ¾

hello, sweet! no worries, this doesn’t make me uncomfortable in the slightest! i admire your quest and that you are so curious. ♡ for me, personally, experiencing romance is akin to the light that i have always wanted to reach. you and this person are the only people in the world; all that matters is getting to be by their side again and the things you will do together next. romance is a flutter that begins in your heart and runs itself through your entire being. it’s experiencing physical lightness that you never knew your body was capable of. it’s forgetting little things because you are so enamored. you have been dipped in a bath of rose petals and glitter and your eyes have permanent stars in them. the first instances of feeling romance are unreal, as if something very new and very exciting is being born into this world. something you didn’t know existed. and to feel it as something real, just makes it all that much more exuberant. you notice them in everything… you feel alive again. ♡ this is all from my own experience, and i truly hope it makes some amount of sense. 😌🌹

flickr

Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna of Russia, 1903 by Olga
Via Flickr:
Ея Императорское Высочество Великая Княгиня Ксенiя Александровна (Боярыня временъ Царя Алексѣя Михаиловича)

finally figured out this AS keyboard only took a million years 

i wasnt having trouble with þ or ā or æ or ƿ etc but i couldnt figure out how to get the capital versions at first. have now, though… Ǣ Þ was as easy as that. 

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PRONUNCIATION

The modern Icelandic alphabet has thirty-two letters, compared with twenty-six in modern English. There are two extra consonants (ð and þ), and an additional diphthong (æ). Readers may find a note on the pronounciations of specifically Icelandic letters helpful:

  • ð (Ð), known as “eth” or “crossed d,” is pronounced like the (voiced) th in breathe.
  •  þ (Þ), known as “thorn,” is pronounced like the (unvoiced) th in breaths.
  • æ is pronounced like the i in life.

 The pronunciation of the vowels is conditioned by the accents:

  •  á like the ow in owl
  •  é like the ye in yet
  •  í like the ee in seen
  •  ó like the o in note
  •  ö like the eu in French fleur
  •  ú like the oo in soon
  •  ýlike the ee in seen
  • au like the œi in French œil
  •  ei and ey like the ay in tray

(Iceland’s Bell )