曜

Things I dislike

-people saying McFucking or Mcfreaking or anything similar
-the word yikes
-unironically saying triggered when talking about someone
Example: “lmao ur triggered aren’t u haha fuckin sjw kek’d mlg I’m 12 and a half”

Oh, wow. It's Munday already. Put some of these in my askbox and I'll respond OOC.
  • ᄏ: Play any instruments?
  • ω: Have you ever dyed your hair? If so, what color(s)?
  • △: Have you ever painted the walls of your room?
  • 【・ヘ・?】: Ever tripped in front a bunch of people?
  • *: When was the last time you tied your hair up? (if your hair is long enough)
  • 旦: Last time you drove your car (if you can drive/have one)?
  • 愛: Are you currently dating?
  • 太: When it's New Year's, do you make New Year Resolutions and actually commit to them?
  • @: Ever felt attracted to the opposite sex before?
  • 空: Did you ever throw up after one roller coaster ride or a few?
  • ☆: Have you ever played games such as 'Spin the Bottle'?
  • ⊙: Are you happy with where you are in life right now?
  • ピ: Did you like Pokemon as a child?
  • ♪: Do you find yourself singing or humming to yourself sometimes?
  • ☁: Ever wanted to learn a foreign language?
  • ス: Have you ever swallowed gum?
  • ⅚: Post the link if your current favorite song.
  • ღ: Post a gif of what you're currently feeling right now.
  • ≘: Have you ever watched the sun rise?
  • ☄: Would you defend a friend if they were in danger?
  • ➍: Ever been to a concert? Was it fun?
  • ♛: Do you like group projects?
  • 高: How often do you use headphones/earbuds?
  • ಲ: Headphones or earbuds?
  • ♞: Showers or baths?
  • ✗: Walks on the beach or in a forest?
  • ⊙﹏⊙: Which horror movie scared you the most? If any?
  • ^∇^: Has your best friend ever made you angry?
  • (._.): Do you think you are an awkward person?
  • メ: Cupcakes or muffins?
  • ♯: Would you like to be able to fly?
  • ℝ: What color shirt are you currently wearing?
  • Æ: What color underwear did you wear yesterday?
  • ☪: Have you ever flipped off someone?
  • ♬: Cats or dogs?
  • 礼: Would you swim in the lake or ocean?
  • の: Chocolate or Vanilla?
  • ◐: Have you ever seen a meteor shower?
  • ᄇ: Have you ever broken a bone?
  • ℨ: If you could go anywhere in the world, where would you go?
  • ♔: Know the Duck Song? The Llama Song? Banana Phone?
  • ۞: What shows did you watch when you were a child?
  • ▼: Could you live without the internet?
  • Д: Strangest food you've eaten?
  • 까: Cookies or brownies?
Why Icelandic is Easy to Learn

There seems to be this idea out there that the Icelandic language is an incredibly difficult language for English speakers to learn, so when I first started studying it I was a bit nervous. However, although I still haven’t been studying it for very long, I’ve yet to run across anything that’s scared me off, and quite a bit that actually makes it quite easy to pick up as a native English speaker. So to cast off some of the stigma, here are some things that make Icelandic easy to learn (or at least not as horrifying as I’d been led to believe):

Spelling is very consistent. Icelandic spelling is mostly phonetic, where each letter represents only one sound. While there are a few instances where letters aren’t pronounced exactly the same, the variations are regular so you can learn when they’re said differently instead of just having to guess, and over time they will become natural with practice. French is supposed to be relatively easy for English speakers to learn due to shared vocabulary, but Icelandic beats French hands down in this area.

Most of the sounds are similar to English. Many of the letters are pronounced basically just like English, and while it might look a little intimidating with all the extra vowels with accent marks and so on, most of those are sounds we actually have in English, they just represent them explicitly in Icelandic, which actually helps with the point about spelling above. Here is a great video that very clearly explains the Icelandic alphabet, and as you can see, out of the 14 vowels/diphthongs there are only 3 that aren’t in English. So sure, there are some sounds that aren’t in English, but that’s going to happen in almost any language, and Icelandic doesn’t seem to be any worse in this area than German, for example. In fact, if you know both German and English, you’re pretty much set when it comes to Icelandic phonemes.

The stress is always the same. In Icelandic words are always pronounced with the stress on the first syllable. In Spanish, for example, the stress changes based on which letters a word ends with and whether or not there are any accent marks, so you have to learn those rules and then memorize each exception so you know where to put the accent, and it can be a little tricky. In Icelandic there is only one rule that never changes, making it super simple.

There are only four cases. Okay, if you’ve never studied a language with cases before, having any at all can be a bit daunting coming from English since we don’t really use them much, but if you’re going to learn a language with cases only having four is pretty great! It’s the same number of cases as German has, and waaay better than Slavic languages that can have six or seven, and there are other languages which have even more.

There are only three new characters to learn. A lot of people seem to be intimidated by the special characters Ðð, Þþ, and Ææ, but if you compare those three measly characters to languages like Greek, Russian, Arabic, or even Japanese – which has two separate syllabaries on top of thousands of kanji to learn – you can see how it’s nothing at all. Best of all, those characters represent sounds that already exist in English, so you can easily learn how to pronounce them. Ð is pronounced as the ‘th’ in ‘breathe’, Þ as the ‘th’ in ‘breath’, and æ as the ‘i’ in ‘hi’. In fact, if you want to say “Hi!” in Icelandic it’s exactly the same: “Hæ!” Similarly, “Bye!” is “Bæ!” You can see too how the spelling here is consistent in Icelandic, using only one character to represent the same sound, while in English we use ‘i’ in one word and ‘ye’ in the other, and in other words we might use even more spellings for the same sound, such as ‘ai’ or ‘y’, or even ‘igh’ (like in ‘sigh’). So even though you do have to learn a few new characters, it’s hardly any, and once you’ve learned them it actually makes Icelandic much easier to read and spell than it would be without them.

A lot of vocab comes from the same Germanic roots as English words. While English has borrowed a bunch of vocab from Latin languages, it still contains many words that come from its Germanic origins, which it shares with Icelandic. You’ve already seen hæ and bæ, and there’s also halló (hello), dóttir (daughter), móðir (mother), hér (here), frá (from), takk (thanks), heitt (hot), kalt (cold), hjálp (help), fiskur (fish), nót (net), undir (under), mús (mouse), and many more.

Basic grammar is very similar to English. Like I’ve said, I haven’t been studying long so I’m sure there’s more complicated stuff coming up, but in the basics I’ve run across so far the word order is so similar to English that you can pretty much take an English sentence and switch out the English words for their Icelandic versions and have a correct sentence. Some examples:

  • I am…
  • Ég er…
  • You are… 
  • Þú ert…
  • I am from Canada.
  • Ég er frá Kanada.
  • Are you from Iceland?
  • Ert þú frá Íslandi?
  • I am not from Spain.
  • Ég er ekki frá Spáni.
  • They come from Japan.
  • Þau koma frá Japan.

I don’t know about you, but the above doesn’t seem so difficult to me. Even if you haven’t learned the pronunciation yet, the grammatical structure is very familiar and many of the words look similar to their English counterparts.

Of course there are difficult things about Icelandic, but there are difficult things about every language. Icelandic is certainly not an impossible language to learn, and there are many things about it that are actually quite simple compared to other languages, or at the very least not any worse. If you’ve considered learning Icelandic, but were hesitant after hearing how terribly difficult it supposedly is, maybe this will show that it doesn’t have to be so scary after all.

Funny facts about the Icelandic language

I get A LOT of questions about Iceland and what it’s like living here. So today I have decided to not answer any of the useful things I could tell you and just make a big shitpost about the Icelandic language. 🔆

Pika- Okay. So keep in mind that Pikachu in Pokémon quite commonly says pika. Like a lot. Pokémon is/was on TV here just like most other countries. Okay so, wanna know what píka means in Ielandic. Vagina. Not even kidding a little. ⚡️🐱

Bra- No, bra does not mean anything related to underwear of any kind. According to us, it’s the sound that ducks make 🦆

Hjúkrunarfræðingur- I know you’re probably thinking that this must mean something very smart and complicated. Nope. This unneccessarily long ass word just means nurse. Yep. 👩🏻‍⚕️

Strætóstoppistöð- another unneccasserily long word. Simply means “bus stop” 👐🏻

Leðurblökumaðurinn- In almost every country in the world Batman is just called Batman or something very similar. Yeah.. we didn’t get the note. Leðurblökumaðurinn it is. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Kind- it does not mean anything related to kindness or any other emotional expression. It means sheep. And according to us it does not tell you “baah” it says “me”. If it happens two times it makes “meme”. Isn’t that just wonderful? 🐑

Geirvarta- it means nipple. The weird thing is that it is made from two words “Geir” which is a pretty common male name here, and “varta” which means “wart”. Imagine if the word for nipple would be “JasonPimple”?! Poor Geir..

Not language related but: we have an app here where you bump your phones together to see if you are related before you have sex with someone. You may have heard this somewhere before but I am here to confirm that this is true. There are only 300.000 people in the entire country so accidental incest is very much a possibility. ⚠️

In Iceland we don’t have just one Santa, no,we have 13. And yes they bring you small gifts each of the thirteen days leading to christmas, but they also are known for stealing hot-dogs and candles, eating all your skyr (fancy yoghurt), slamming doors, and other not so bad but mildly annoying things. But their mom is a hideous troll lady that lives in the mountains and eats children. Yikes.. 🎄💀

We have at least two letters that no other country in the world uses: ð (capital Ð) and þ (capital Þ) and also other rare letters that are only used here and in other Scandinavian countries: ö (Ö) and æ (Æ).

To make the sounds of Ð and Þ put your tongue between your teeth and blow. Softly for ð and hard for Þ (should sound like Th in Thor/thing/thunder/etc)

Hope you enjoyed 🤜🏻🤛🏻

I was tagged by @princesspeiper​ to create an aesthetic board (thanks)!  Until now, I hadn’t noticed that my “aesthetic” (or pictures I found intriguing, really) consisted of tanks and people with their backs to the camera/facelessness.  I do like studying the daily life and habits of a typical soldier lost in the masses and overshadowed by famous historical figures, so maybe that explains it.

I’ll tag @justanothereuropean, @yourigagarine, and anyone else who wants to do this, really.

youtube

Lesson one in Norwegian: Vowels

anonymous asked:

Special characters pronunciation

Velkomin(n), vinur minn.
(Welcome, my friend.)

As per your request, I will go into some detail about how to pronounce the following special characters in Old Norse: þ, ð, æ, œ, ø, ǫ, and ö

If there are others that you would like to see discussed, please do not hesitate to let them be known.


þ (’thorn’) and ð (’eth’)

Both of these characters represent the English sound ‘th’ (a dental fricative), but ‘þ’ is unvoiced while ‘ð’ is voiced. When saying an ‘ð’, you should feel your vocal cords vibrating. Here are some English examples:

  • Þ, þ: thistle, cloth, thing
  • Ð, ð: bathe, clothe, they

In Old Norse, ‘þ’ can only appear at the beginning of a word (Þórr, þér, þing, etc.). There are, however, exceptions to this when considering compounds: Bergþórshváli = berg (rock face, geo.) + Þóra (a personal name, an gen. þórs) + hváll (hill). Yet, in this case, the proper name is actually Bergþóra (itself a compound), thus Bergthora’s Hill. Similarly, ‘ð’ never occurs at the beginning of a word, but rather in the middle or the end.

Here is a video by Dr. Jackson Crawford that may be helpful as well:


æ (’ash’)

This special character sounds like the ‘a’ in the English word ‘ash’ (this, of course, can change based on dialects). Here are some other English examples:

  • Æ, æ: ash, nap, trap, clash, cat

Although some of the English examples above contain a short ‘a’ sound, the vowel ‘æ’ is always long in Old Norse. See the video at the end of this post for an audio example (6:12).


œ and ø

These special characters have a bit of a special relationship with one another (as well as with the special characters below).

ø’ is very much like the sound of ‘e’ in the English word ‘pet’, except with rounded lips. Another way to explain this special character is that it is somewhat a combination of two sounds: ‘e’ and ‘o’. Thus, it is the ‘e’ sound in ‘pet’ with the rounded lips of an ‘o’. This sound should be made towards the front of your mouth. It takes a bit of practice, but you should be able to feel the front ‘pinched’ a bit, and your throat should open up a bit more. See the video at the end of this post for an audio example (6:36).

  • Ø, ø: the ‘e’ in ‘pet’ with the rounded lips of an ‘o

œ’ is essentially a long version of the ‘ø’ above. In certain manuscripts it is actually written as ‘ǿ’. Like most other accented vowels in Old Norse, this just lengthens the shorter sound. So, with that having been said: œ = ǿ = a long ‘ø’ = e+o. See the video at the end of this post for an audio example (7:45).

  • Œ, œ: ǿ

ǫ and ö

‘ǫ’ is essentially a shorter ‘á’ sound, which we have not discussed here. Nonetheless, it should sound something like this:

  • Ǫ, ǫ: the ‘au’ sound in ‘caught’, but with rounded lips and shorter than the ‘á’ (which is the same sound, but longer).

This is another difficult sound to get used to, but with practice it can be done. It is very similar to the ‘ø’ above, but instead of being a combination of the sounds ‘e’ and ‘o’, it is a combination of the sounds ‘a’ and ‘o’. Instead of being a front sound, it is more of a back sound (a more open throat and a less closed mouth). See the video at the end of this post for an audio example (8:08).

By the thirteenth century, ‘ǫ’ had begun to merge with ‘ø’, producing ‘ö’. This sound was also represented by ‘au’, ‘ꜹ’, and even ‘ø’. It is not the same sound as ‘ǫ’, but it is fairly similar. The difference is that ‘ö’ is a front sound, whereas ‘ǫ’ was more of a back sound. 

  • Ö, ö: similar to ‘ǫ’, but more like the ‘u’ in ‘cut’ with rounded lips.

‘ö’ is more commonly used for modern Icelandic, but some scholars use ‘ö’ to represent the Old Norse ‘ǫ’ (such as Jesse L. Byock). There is debate around this, but it really depends on the time period of the text being looked at, as well as the orthography associated with it. Dr. Jackson Crawford notes that ‘ǫ’ is the standard for Old Norse. Go to 8:38 of this video for some audio examples from Dr. Jackson Crawford:


Here is another video by Dr. Jackson Crawford that may be helpful for better understanding these characters and their pronunciations. Go to the timestamps mentioned above for the pronunciation of æ (6:12), ø (6:36), œ (7:45), and ǫ (8:08) in particular.

[His video has been deleted, it seems. I will revise this post in the near future with updated videos and resources – my apologies for the inconvenience this may cause in the meantime]


SOURCES:

As always, here are the sources that I have used (other than Dr. Jackson Crawford’s wonderful YouTube channel) in the making of this post:

1. Jesse L. Byock, Viking Language 1: Learn Old Norse, Runes, and Icelandic Sagas. (Pacific Palisades, CA: Jules William Press, 2013), 330-331.

2. Guðvarður Már Gunnlaugsson, “Manuscripts and Paleography,” in A Companion to Old Norse-Icelandic Literature and Culture, edited by Rory McTurk. (Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2007), 258.


DISCLAIMER (I am also not much of a linguist, so I may have explained a few characters incorrectly; corrections may be made in the future.)

My Mods Folder is 12.3 GB and used to take 10-15 minutes to load. Tonight I removed all the spaces and special characters, and when I loaded my game it made a huge difference! 12.3 GB didn’t take any more than 2 minutes to load. And the game is a lot smoother now!

If your game is slow too, you can get it to run faster by renaming your packages! All you have to do is remove the spaces and special characters!
eg. this is a file name_1.package  > thisisafilename1.package

List of special characters: (for those who don’t know)

 é ”, ; . : ~ ! > £ ’ < ^ # $ + % ½ & { / [ (  _ * ? \ - ] ) } € @ æ ß ü ğ ı ç ö ¨

Please spread the word!

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I was tagged by the ever-so-loveable @ghostmoonchild
and I may have squealed a little because this is exactly my kind of tag lmao
I actually have a folder of saved images on my phone that are just aesthetic-y things haha

I will tag: @herehavesomepie, @karlseer, @krimsons, @angeljaes, @ash-soka, aaaand @kjallo
go nuts, peeps くコ:彡