#benningtoncollege

It’s THAT time of year again...

FINALS ARE HERE!!! But we will persevere! With only 9 days left until the end of term, it’s time to get down and ~*dirty*~ and do all that work we probably should’ve started already… oops. Time to stop binging Grey’s Anatomy (Christina Yang is my spirit animal) and write that paper y’all! #wishmeluck

Originally posted by ignitetheliight

~ Sara ‘19 ~

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Enjoy highlights from The 24 Hour Plays® which brought together more than 60 alumni to write, rehearse, and present six one-act plays in honor of former faculty member Nicky Martin. As Eben Moore ‘96 reflected, “there’s nothing wrong with being an eternal child at play –especially when the talent is this good.”

anonymous asked:

Hey guys! I was just wondering about the bedding situation; do you think that it's in my best interest to bring a down comforter, or does Bennington supply them?

Hello!

You should definitely bring all the bedding you want. Bennington doesn’t supply any bedding for students. I have a down comforter, which keeps me cozy, some people prefer quilts, it’s really up to you! It does get chilly in the winter months, so I would definitely recommend multiple blankets if you don’t go for the down comforter!

Sweet Dreams!

~Varney ‘17

anonymous asked:

what is a module class?

Modules are three week long, one credit courses. They are offered across most disciplines and are a great way to try something out or get some knowledge on a very specific topic. This term there’s also a new thing called pop-up courses, which are modules but more spontaneous. These are meant to be in response to current events or things happening on campus. For instance, there will be one this spring on Gloria Steinem, who is this year’s graduation speaker.

~Varney ‘17

Manifesting

We are back on an extremely snowy and cold campus after our seven week Field Work Term internships. This winter I was in Portland, Oregon working with the Nike Foundation. When I was thinking about what I wanted to do for Field Work Term this fall I knew I wanted to get a new angle on the work I’ve already done in Kenya. Most of my experience with NGOs (non-govermental organizations) and CBOs (community-based organizations) has been on the ground work, which I absolutely love, and last year for FWT I worked for an NGO called the Africa Yoga Project, for which I worked remotely from home. I was in contact with National Geographic, USAID, and the Nike Foundation throughout the fall. I wish I could have done all three, but when it came time to decide I chose the Nike Foundation. I think what made the decision for me is that the Foundation solely focuses on adolescent girls and girls and women’s issues are of particular interest to me.

My friend Sam and I had spent the fall “manifesting” Portland as our FWT 2015 destination. It was mostly a joke, but also it worked so now I’m a believer in the power of manifestation. She worked for a local author in Portland and we lived together in an adorable airbnb and were frequently visited by our host’s adorable (but also kind of gross) pug, Stubbs. We quickly fell into the routine of an old married couple and loved it.

I really didn’t know what to expect going into my time at Nike. I had never worked in that type of environment (the foundation in on the Nike World Headquarters campus). All the buildings on the campus are named after famous athletes. The foundation is in the Mike Schmidt building (don’t worry I also had to google him). Every day, as I walked into my office I was greeted by a plaque with a Mike Schmidt quote that read: “Any time you think you have the game conquered, the game will turn around and punch you right in the nose”. It was hard not to laugh/cry at this coming from the nurturing Bennington environment. I expected to do most of my learning by observing while at the Foundation. I knew I was pretty out of my league and didn’t feel super confident in what I had to offer. However, I quickly realized that I would be contributing much more and in much more meaningful ways than I had anticipated.

On my first day my supervisor pulled me into a meeting where our team was discussing potential partners in India. We heard a presentation about several organizations and key issues, then discussed which groups and projects could be potential partners for Nike. I was immediately asked for my opinion and had a vote when it came down to deciding on organizations. This day and meeting really set the tone for the rest of my time at the Foundation. My main project was to do research and write a paper/brief on girls doing domestic work in developing countries. I spent most of my time working on this and also got to sit in on and participate in many meetings. My final product was a 25 page research paper and a presentation on my findings. It was incredible to leave my Field Work Term having completed something significant and tangible for both myself and the organization I was working for. I also made so many connections with people who have lots of experience in the field who will be excellent connections for me in the future as I move forward.

vimeo

The Bear (2014)
my animation project from the fall term

The Best Assignment Ever

This term, I took Michael Cohen’s “Idea’s and Practice: Conflict Resolution” class.  The final assignment for this class was to write a paper analyzing a civil conflict that we find interesting and come up with possible solutions to it. In my paper I analyzed the Sri Lankan civil war  using Edward Azar’s theory of Protracted Social Conflict. 

This paper is definitely my favorite assignment of all time. :)

The beginning:

The end:

The Best Assignment Ever

This term, I took Michael Cohen’s “Idea’s and Practice: Conflict Resolution” class.  The final assignment for this class was to write a paper analyzing a civil conflict that we find interesting and come up with possible solutions to it. In my paper I analyzed the Sri Lankan civil war  using Edward Azar’s theory of Protracted Social Conflict. 

This paper is definitely my favorite assignment of all time. :)

The beginning:

The end: 

What's a "great conversation" to me?

We all have great conversations almost every day. But there are some conversations we have that are powerful enough to describe an entire chapter of our lives.

This is a picture of me receiving the National Literary Award for my novel in 2009 from Mahinda Rajapaksa, the president of Sri Lanka. The award, previously won by other Sri Lankan authors such as Michael Ondaatje has reputation of an average recipient age of 50. I’m the youngest National Lliterary Award winner in the world.  When I walked up to the stage there was applause suddenly paused by a searing silence. Everyone was surprised to see how young  I was.

The conversation I’m having in this picture was no longer than 15 words but looking back, I realize it defines my entire childhood.

The President:  “How old are you?”

Me: “Sixteen, sir”

The President: “How old are you, really?”

Me: “I really am sixteen, sir”

When I published my first novel at the age of fourteen, (after being rejected by several publishing houses that said they “don’t publish books written by kids”) I received all kinds of criticism. Titled Colombo Streets, my book was based on the lives of children (like myself) growing up with the war in Sri Lanka.  While the book sold out 3 editions in a year, became a national bestseller and received many great reviews, there were also many  people in my country who argued that children/ teenagers should not be allowed to publish work about sensitive topics such as ongoing wars and civil conflicts. Some were so infuriated that they created entire hate-blogs on my writing. “A word of advice to parents: Encourage your children to read first, buy them books, rather than let them publish their book. They will thank you for it, when they are ready to write their novel as adults,” one of the bloggers wrote.  I never quite understood why people believed my age should keep me from publishing my work.

I think back to this conversation every now and then. The reason I treasure it so much is because it  reminds me of who I really am. How I  learnt to break conventions at such a young age,   and how I should never let anything; may it be  my age, gender, or the color of my skin;   hold me back from living my dreams.   

I’m eternally grateful to this conversation. Because I truly believe, it is what brought me to Bennington. 

So yeah, that’s a great conversation to me.