$80 000

The Ship That Never Was. North German Lloyd’s Amerika was to be a 1,080 foot long, 80,000 tons super liner designed to compete with Normandie and Queen Mary. North German Lloyd hoped to have her built by 1937. The clouds of impending war and then eventual war, prevented her from ever being built.

4

The Los Angeles Women’s March expected 80,000. 750,000 reportedly showed up.

  • All across the U.S. — and around the globe — participants came out for women’s marches on Saturday. In Los Angeles alone, the turnout exceeded organizers’ expectations almost 10 times over.
  • Organizers expected 80,000 people to show up to march in Downtown LA, one NBC LA reporter said in a tweet. But the total was closer to 750,000, according to updates from the organizers.
  • Celebrities came out for the LA chapter of the march, too — Barbra Streisand, Kerry Washington, Natalie Portman, Ariana Grande, Laverne Cox and Demi Lovato were all reportedly at the march. Read more

Can we talk about this for a minute?

This is a Yale-educated law professor, First Lady, Senator, and Secretary of State who:

-Endured 25 years of smear campaigns
-Lost the Electoral College by 80,000 votes
-Won the popular vote by 3 million votes
-Attended her opponent’s inauguration
-Received no handshake from Trump
-Was booed by the crowd when she appeared

And goddammit… LOOK at her. Polished and confident, wearing white for the Suffragettes, her husband taking *her* arm instead of the other way around.

Symbolism matters.

Perseverance matters.

She matters.

This is the godmother of New America, a rational, pragmatic, imperfect human being who was born 50 years too early for her gender to be a non-issue in an election.

While she missed the presidency, she arrived just in time to show us all, in unflinching terms, the deep undercurrent of sexist double standards in our society.

And in doing so, she taught generations of girls and women that yes, you DO matter and yes, you CAN do anything.

This is Hillary Clinton.

Green Day songs for when you are feeling ________

Joy/hopeful: 99 Revolutions, 21st Century Breakdown, Carpe Diem, Forever Now, Good Riddance (Time of your life), Holiday, 21 Guns, King for a Day, Last of the American Girls, Minority, Ordinary World, Outlaws, Revolution Radio, See the Light, Somewhere Now, Still Breathing, Sweet 16, Waiting, Welcome to Paradise, ¡Viva la Gloria!

Love: 1,000 Hours, 80, 2,000 Light Years Away, Dry Ice, Fell for you, Hearts Collide, Last Night on Earth, Missing you, Only of you, Redundant, Scattered, See you tonight, Stay the Night, Sweet 16, The one I want, Whatsername, When it’s Time, Youngblood

Anger: Bab’s Uvula Who?, Brat, Christian’s Inferno, East Jesus Nowhere, Letterbomb, F.O.D, Ha Ha You’re Dead, Having a Blast, Horseshoes and Handgrenades, Kill the DJ, Know your Enemy, Platypus(I Hate You), Say Goodbye, Take Back, You Lied

Confusion: A Little Boy Named Train, Are We the Waiting, Armatage Shanks, Coming Clean, Going to Pasalacqua, Jaded, Knowledge, Loss of Control, One for the Razorbacks, One of my lies, The Static Age, Too Dumb to Die, Walking Contradiction, Why do you want him?, X-Kid

Sadness/Pain: Amy, Give me novacaine, Macy’s Day Parade, Misery, No one knows, Outlaws, Pulling Teeth, Restless Heart Syndrome, Wake Me Up When September Ends, Whatsername, Words I Might Have Ate

Pity/Desperation: Brutal Love, Church on Sunday, Emenius Sleepus, Hitchin’ a Ride, Lazy Bones, Misery, Murder City, Oh Love, Paper Lanterns, Pulling Teeth, The Forgotten, Walk Away, ¿Viva La Gloria? (Little Girl)

Disgust: 86, All the Time, Jackass, Nice Guys Finish Last, Platypus (I hate you), Prosthetic Head, Reject, Sick of Me, Stuart and the Ave., The Grouch

Bored: Christie Road, Last Ride In, Lazy Bones, Longview, Rest, Rotting, Sassafras Roots, Tired Of Waiting For You, When I Come Around

Afraid: 16, Don’t wanna fall in love, Don’t leave me, No Pride, Peacemaker, Road to Acceptance, Troubled Times, Warning, X-Kid, Working Class Hero

Anxiety: Basket Case, Brain Stew, Burnout, No Pride, One of My Lies, Panic Song, Stuck With Me, Suffocate, Who Wrote Holden Caulfield?

Alone: Boulevard Of Broken Dreams, Castaway, Disappearing Boy, Jesus Of Suburbia, Misery, Missing You, Suffocate, Walking Alone

Jealousy: Chump, In The End, Nice Guys Finish Last, Paper Lanterns

4

Palestinian student Shorouq Dwayyat, 19, sentenced to 16 years in Israeli prison

In another example of the lengthy sentencing practices especially targeting Palestinian youth and women in Jerusalem, Shorouq Dwayyat was sentenced to 16 years in Israeli prison by a Jerusalem court on Sunday, 25 December. Dwayyat, 19, from the village of Sur Baher, was also fined 80,000 NIS (approximately $21,000.) She was shot by an Israeli settler and seized by occupation forces on 7 October 2015 in eastern Jerusalem and accused of attempting to stab an Israeli settler. Witnesses reported that she was harassed by the settler prior to the alleged incident.

Dwayyat is a student at Bethlehem University who was studying history and geography. She graduated from high school, achieving a result of 90% in the national secondary Tawjihi examinations in 2015.

Classes at the university were cancelled for two days after her shooting and arrest in October 2015.

Dwayyat was severely injured by the four bullets lodged within her body, unlike the Israeli man she was accused of attempting to stab, who suffered no serious injuries. Following the court’s ruling, the Israeli Interior Ministry stripped the imprisoned Dwayyat of her Jerusalem residency, claiming “breach of trust,” using the case as a mechanism to further the Israeli state policy of attacking Palestinian existence in Jerusalem. Amjad Abu Assab of the Prisoners’ Committee in Jerusalem said that “this is a racist policy…with the aim of killing the spirit of challenge by Jerusalemites and preventing any manifestation of rejection of occupation in the occupied city of Jerusalem.”

She is one of 52 Palestinian women – including 12 minor girls – imprisoned in HaSharon and Damon Israeli prisons and now is serving one of the longest sentences. The longest-held Palestinian woman prisoner, Lena Jarbouni, is serving a 17-year sentence in Israeli prison.  The recent trend of particularly elevated sentences include those against Maysoon Musa (15 years), Nurhan Awad (13.5 years) and Israa Jaabis (11 years).

The turnout for the Women’s March in Washington is now expected to be DOUBLE the turnout for the inauguration itself. And that’s just in Washington today. (500k vs 250k)

Yesterday more people marched in the Texas anti-Trump rally than attended the inauguration. IN TEXAS.

80,00-100,000 turned up in London.

hundreds of thousands more are marching all over the world.

They’re even marching in ANTARCTICA.

They’ve estimated now that over 1 million people have been or will be marching today.

This is breathtaking. I am so so amazed by this, and I’m just saddened that I can’t join in today.

The Pirate Queen of the South China Sea

The Red Flag Fleet under Ching Shih’s rule went undefeated, despite attempts by Qing dynasty officials, the Portuguese navy, and the East India Company to vanquish it. After three years of notoriety on the high seas, Ching Shih finally retired in 1810 by accepting an offer of amnesty from the Chinese government. Ching Shih died in 1844, at the ripe old age of 69.At the dawn of the 1800s, a former prostitute from a floating brothel in the city of Canton was wed to Cheng I, a fearsome pirate who operated in the South China Sea in the Qing dynasty. Though the name under which we now know her, Ching Shih, simply means “Cheng’s widow,” the legacy she left behind far exceeded that of her husband’s. Following his death, she succeeded him and commanded over 1,800 pirate ships, and an estimated 80,000 men.

Her husband, Ching I, was the formidable commander of the Red Flag Fleet of pirate ships. He married a 26-year-old Ching Shih in 1801. She quickly took to the pirate life and when Ching I died six years later, Ching Shih wasn’t going to let Ching I’s adopted son, Cheung Po Tsai take over.  Cheung Po Tsai, however, was more than just Ching Shih’s adopted son –-  the young man had also been Ching I’s lover.

Keep reading

american history books and american news outlets really do pretend the AIDS crisis never happened… i didn’t know a god damn thing about the AIDS crisis before i started reading articles online. the mainstream public tries very hard to pretend it did not happen

i just read a NYT article reassuring the american people that we “felt the way we feel about trump towards reagan too” and how “he ended up greatly improving the country”

and i’m like…. are you fucking serious? is 80,000+ deaths from AIDS by the end of his presidency alone not enough of a fucking failure to count?

this country has always turned a blind eye to our worst mistakes and refused to hold our leaders accountable and now that i’m older and i’m gay myself it burns me to think that society at large really just doesn’t care that reagan’s homophobia wiped out an entire generation of gay men & trans women and set the LGBT rights movement very, very far back

like that’s apparently just not relevant enough for them to criticize him for

3

March 17th 1959: Dalai Lama flees Tibet

On this day in 1959, Tenzin Gyatso - the fourteenth Dalai Lama, a central figure of Vajrayana Buddhism - fled Tibet for India. He fled following the 1959 Tibetan uprising against Chinese rule which broke out in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa, where the Dalai Lama lived. Fearing for his safety, he and around twenty of his entourage fled Lhasa on March 17th and embarked on a 15 day journey on foot over the Himalayan mountains to Dharamsala in India where they had been offered asylum. No news was heard of the Dalai Lama, and many feared their spiritual and political leader had been killed during the arduous journey. However, on March 30th he crossed into India and people learned that he was safe. He was followed by around 80,000 Tibetans who settled in the same area of India, leading to it becoming known as ‘Little Lhasa’. This place became the home to the Tibetan government-in-exile. Tibet remains under Chinese rule, and the Dalai Lama continues to try to find a peaceful negotiation for Tibetan self rule.

10

The Freedom (300 sq ft) by Milford, Michigan based Minimalist Homes - minimalisthomes.com/freedom

Features:

- 40 x 8 feet and 9.5 feet high
- 1 Bedroom, 1 bathroom, a full kitchen, washer and drier
- Hardwood floors, granite counters
- Fully built out with top quality materials and components
- High efficiency heating, cooling, hot and cold water
- All codes met
- LED lighting
- Efficient hot water system
- Very high R factors for maximum comfort at low costs in all climates
- $5,000 credit for exterior finish on-site.

Pricing: Delivered $70,000 - Installed $80,000

People remain calm as the world ends, video game study suggests

As the world ends, will you lock arms and sing “Kumbayah” or embark on a path of law-breaking, anti-social behavior?

A new study, based upon the virtual actions of more than 80,000 players of the role-playing video game ArcheAge, suggests you’ll be singing.

The study, conducted by a University at Buffalo-led team of computer scientists, will be presented next month at the International World Wide Web Conference in Australia. It found that despite some violent acts, most players tended toward behavior that was helpful to others as their virtual world came to an end.

Keep reading

80,000 Followers

Holy shit! I CANNOT believe how many followers this blog has! 

I’d like to thank all of you beautiful people who submit, reblog, and send so many wonderful messages! I had no idea that this blog would be such a big hit, and it makes me so happy to know how much joy and laughter this blog has brought!! 

Writing Series #2: Plotting

Everyone has their own strategy for this one, but it’s also probably the aspect of writing that we ask each other about most of the time: what do you do to figure out your plot? How do you stick to a plot? How do you know where a story is going? How do you stay interested long enough to finish? How do you keep from getting lost? For first time writers, this is particularly daunting, as we tend to think of a book–all 80,000 words or so–as overwhelming and more than we know how to accomplish, as something too big or unattainable. 

Some writers sit down with a single idea and go from there, letting the story come as it may and waiting for the ideas to strike as they write. For many writers, this works. For me, it doesn’t. 

My process looks a lot more like this:

  1. Wait for an idea to strike (and I mean strike; it has to come to me, haunt me, bug me, until I’m sure I can do nothing but write it)
  2. Plot. Plan out everything. Write it all down, outlining each chapter–what will happen in each and how many there will be.
  3. Write. 
  4. Edit. 
  5. Edit again. 

Step One: There are lots of good ideas out there, and my notebooks are filled with ideas; ideas that occurred to me in the middle of the night, ideas I thought up after witnessing something in a park or listening to a good song. New ideas are exciting and can lead to great things, but I won’t turn any of them into a book until I’m sure the idea won’t go away. 

I don’t write it down. That’s the first test; if I haven’t forgotten it the next day, or the next, or the next, then I know it might actually lead somewhere, that it’s not a fleeting idea that will tempt me and then leave me hanging. I let this go on for a month–yes, a whole month–and if at the end of that month, I still can’t let that idea go, if it’s still rolling around in my head, waiting to be explored, then I move onto step two. By then, I know that the idea and me are long-term, that we’re in this for the long run. 

Step Two: I plot. I plot everything. 

  • I start with the main arc: where do I want the story to start, and where do I want it to finish. In my most recent story, for example, I knew that I wanted the main character to begin cynical of love and relationships, and I wanted the story to end with him opening his heart to the possibility (even if he wasn’t yet in a relationship–that bit I’d find out later). I knew I wanted the three strangers at the beginning of the story to be best friends by the end. I knew they’d all start with some trauma, and I wanted them all to successfully be on the path to recovery and healing by the end. 
  • Then I looked to time: I believe it’s important to know just how much ground, chronologically speaking, a book is going to cover. I needed to know how long my characters would have to experience the emotional growth mentioned above (the less time, the more the plot would have to directly affect them, the more intense that plot would need to be). I gave them the summer. Just three months to learn and get to know each other, which meant every day was going to count, and I wasn’t going to be writing a lot of moments skipping ahead in time. (If the story was to last five years, for example, I’d have a lot more room to build these relationships, and so things could unfold more subtly and with large chunks of time between.)
  • Then I look to characters: I write down all the main and minor characters (naming them is a good first step, though this can change later) and I write down both their emotional state when the story starts and what they’re actively doing with their lives, and their emotional state when the story ends and where they’re at/going with their lives then. 

As you’ll see, there’s a pattern here: I figure out point A and point B. Then I make a list of little things I want to happen, different scenes that have begun to play out in my head, interactions I want the characters to have, pitstops no the way from A to B. And slowly, I build the story around them. I begin to figure out how we get there, which road the story is going to take, and little by little, the story comes together until I have an outline that looks a bit like this:

Chapter One: Opens in [setting]. Character A talks to Character B about [topic] They meet Character C. Ends with Character A realizing [topic]. 

And so on, until we get to the last chapter. In a way, this outline becomes a script, my go-to plan. 

Do I always stick to the script? No. But when I begin to write, I keep that list pulled up beside my new blank word document, and I read it from time to time. Sometimes, once I get writing, once I begin to know the characters a bit more, and once the story finds a voice of its own, I go off script, and the story takes me places I wouldn’t have expected. But I always make sure I refer back, make sure that one way or another, I come back to to road map. It’s okay to take a pitstop on the path, to go off on a tangent, but the plot map allows me to find my way back to what’s relevant, to what I know has to happen to get from A to B. 

For any writers out there who worry about making their stories big enough, who have trouble thinking of side plots, this is also a good way to map that out and see where your story has room to grow and what it can encapsulate. It lets you see just how big the story will become and if it belongs in novel format or if, perhaps, the idea is better suited for a short story. 

To all the writers out there: how do you plot? Are you a planner or a wing-it sort of writer, or is there some way to write in between? Feel free to comment her or message with your go-to tips!

Extremely Rare Coin from Kyzikos with a Winged Dolphin-Headed Man

Of the highest rarity, only the second specimen known and the only one in private hands! This sold at auction for around $80,000.

This is an electrum stater from the ancient city of Kyzikos (Cyzicus) in Mysia struck circa 550-450 BC. Obverse: Winged figure to right, consisting of man’s body with dolphin’s head, holding tunny fish in left hand, right hand raised behind head.

The type of this coin is at first glance completely perplexing - there are no part man, part dolphin hybrid monsters known in Greek mythology. To better understand the type we must therefore consider other possibilities.

The prevalence of winged beings in Kyzikene coinage is a reflection of archaic mythological convention that assigned wings to most divine or sacred entities as an immediately visible and understandable symbol of their nature, and in the case of gods, of their power to move at will across great distances. The presence of wings on this figure therefore indicates a divine identity.

Several gods are associated with dolphins, notably Poseidon, Aphrodite and even Dionysos. The latter on one occasion was traveling in disguise among a group of Tyrrhenian pirates, who thinking him only a man, decided to sell him into slavery; Dionysos transformed them into dolphins as they dove into the sea to escape his wrath, charging them for evermore with rescuing sailors in distress. While it could be argued therefore that the image on this coin represents a sailor in mid-transformation, this does not satisfactorily explain why it should be accorded a divine aspect, nor why an obscure myth should be chosen to feature on the coinage of Kyzikos.

Instead we should turn to the Homeric Hymns of Apollo, which relate that having been born on the island of Delos in the Cyclades, the god grew to manhood in just four days, and from there set out into the world, looking for a place to make his home, until he arrived at last at Mount Parnassos and the site of Pytho. Finding it occupied already by the oracle of Gaia and guarded by a serpent known as Python, the offspring of Gaia, Apollo slew the monster with an arrow and claimed the site for his own. Yet, despite being the son of Zeus, Apollo had nonetheless committed murder and to cleanse the blood-guilt he was required to serve king Admetos of Pherai in Thessaly for nine years. This he did, and when he returned to Pytho he came in the form of a dolphin bringing with him priests from Crete. The site became known as Delphi, from the Greek word for dolphin: ‘delphis’.

It is most likely that we are expected to see in this coin’s winged dolphin-headed man a representation of Apollo Delphinios: Apollo of Delphi; Apollo the dolphin. This identification is further supported by some myths which name the eponymous founder of Kyzikos’ father as being none other than the god Apollo; Aristides (Orat. Cyzic., 1, p.114) goes so far as to speak of the god himself as the founder of the city.