zoologisch

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New Butterflies of the insect collection of the Royal. Zoologischen Musei der Universität zu Berlin on Flickr.

By Klug, Mrs. (Frederick), 1775-1856 Hopffer, Carl, 1810 -
Wienker, B. Zoological Museum in Berlin. ,de
Publication info
Berlin: In the editor from 0.1836 to 1856.,de
BHL Collections:
Smithsonian Libraries

Preserving Animals for Museum Collections: Wet Specimen Prep of Reptiles and Amphibians

When you visit a zoological collection in a natural history museum, you come across two distinct types of specimen preservation: wet and dry. Dry specimens are typically composed of just skin or just bones; birds, mammals, and most insects are most commonly stored dry. Wet specimens include those stored in ethanol, formalin, a mixture of the two, glycerol, and various other liquid chemicals; reptiles, amphibians, fish, whole mammals (i.e. more than just skin or bones), and most non-insect invertebrates are stored wet.

Wet storage has serious advantages. It preserves the whole body of the animal, allowing a great deal more information to be extracted than just a study skin. It allows a better understanding of the morphology of an animal. And it requires a lot less prep than dry storage. But it can still be a bit temperamental.

I have wanted to write a long post about the methods we use at my museum to prepare animals, firstly to provide some guidelines for those of you who have dead animals in your freezers that you want to prepare for your own collections, and second to give an insight into the inner workings of museum collections.

Keep reading

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(1) An Asian elephant eats a pine tree in her enclosure at Berlin’s Zoologischer Garten zoo, on Jan. 13. The elephants are fed pine trees discarded by Berlin residents after Christmas, once a year. Image ©. 2012 John Macdougall / AFP - Getty Images, All Rights Reserved.

(2) An elephant holds up a fir tree at the Zoo in Berlin, Germany, on Jan. 13. Every year, the elephants of the Berlin Zoo receive Christmas trees that were not sold during the holiday season. Firs and spruces are a great supplement to the nutritional protocol of the animals. Image ©. 2012 Caroline Seidel / EPA, All Rights Reserved.

(3) An elephant eats parts of a fir tree at the Zoo in Berlin, Germany, on Jan. 13. Every year, the elephants of the Berlin Zoo receive Christmas trees that were not sold during the holiday season. Firs and spruces are a great supplement to the nutritional protocol of the animals. Image ©. 2012 Caroline Seidel / EPA, All Rights Reserved.

Hungry for holiday leftovers? Elephants munch on unsold Christmas trees in Germany

January 13, 2012

By Natalia Jimenez, NBC News

It turns out that Christmas trees are tasty snacks for elephants. Each year, German zoos will feed unsold Christmas trees to their elephants. The trees are donated by the tree sellers, who would otherwise throw them away. Germany’s Spiegel Online spoke to Thomas Kauffels, director of the Opel Zoo near Frankfurt:

"Elephants like to eat wood, it’s important for their digestion because it gives them roughage, especially in winter when there aren’t many leaves on the trees. We fed them one or two trees each per day. If we gave them 10 at a time they’d get picky and would only eat the tips.

Our elephants like the trees. I certainly haven’t had any complaints.”

The elephants pictured certainly seem to enjoy it!

King Friedrich Wilhelm IV donated the first animals for the Zoologischer Garten Berlin in 1844. The zoo’s next door neighbor, the Royal Danish Embassy, has now become the luxury boutique Das Stue hotel, where guests can watch the animals in the zoo from a glassed-in addition.

nymeria578 replied to your post: nymeria578 replied to your post “nymer…

I supposed that you lived near Spandau according to your fic ;) I lived in Tiergarten less than 200 meters from Hauptbahnhof or formerly known as Lehrter Bahnhof. Thanks to your fic I so miss Berlin right now ;) I moved away in 2008.

Well, I didn’t spend much time there - I know Charlottenburg well, and the areas around Zoologischer Garten, the Hauptbahnhof, and Alexanderplatz. And when I was there the first time I was staying near Ostkreuz and I went back to visit the area once. Definitely a different feeling than the west, for sure! I also have a couple of singer friends who live in Prenzlauerberg, so I know that bit, too. It’s a big city, hard to get to know is just a few months! I love it and miss it, too, though! Setting part of a story there was a way to spend some time there again, in a way. :)

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Город -космополит с неуёмной энергией …вторая столица Европы по численности населения - Берлин !

После падения Берлинской стены за два десятилетия , он смог полностью возродится и  измениться до неузнаваемости ,  стать  процветающей туристической столицей мирового масштаба. Ежегодно около 20 млн. человек из многих стран мира посещают Берлин .

  Туристический сезон длится круглый год, но обычно наибольшее количество туристов приезжают в столицу в тёплое время года – в период с мая по сентябрь,  в  мае у жителей Европы череда праздников. а также это «горячая» пора автобусных туров, и очень много школьников путешествует в это время. Поэтому будьте готовы что самые длинные очереди прежде всего выстраиваются возле билетных касс тематических парков таких как «LegoLand», зоопарка «Zoologischer Garten Berlin» и аквапарка «Tropical Islands». 

А количество фестивалей и праздников проходящих в немецкой столице круглый год просто поражает !

http://www.t.zp.ua/Автобусные-туры-по-Европе