zine-communities

POC Zine Project

An article published in late January of this year tells the story of how the POC Zine Project came to be. At first, as the article explains, POC (People of Color) Zine Project creator Daniela Capistrano “had no idea zines weren’t just for people of color.” As she would later discover, “zine culture is so closely correlated with punk, a predominantly white subculture that’s more inclusive in theory than in practice, zine communities in many cities are also predominantly white.” So in response, Capistrano created the POC Zine Project, “making zines by people of color easy to find, distribute, and share.”

It’s projects like this that remind us of just how multi-cultural of a world we live in. The zine community is widely diverse, with writers of virtually every imaginable background: be it race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, economic, or otherwise. Zines (and other forms of self-publishing, for that matter) acknowledge the voices of those who often find themselves underrepresented. The power to write something and distribute it, the power to spread your ideas, your opinions, your beliefs, no matter how unpopular or radical they may be, these abilities amplify the tremendous voices of the vastly diverse population that we are all a part of.


- Chris Lambrecht

DIY: Zine

This week I am doing it myself and creating a zine, a small, self‐published booklet of work. Anything can be included in a zine, and how many zines are published is up to the creator. Content ranges from personal essays to comics to artwork ‐ or a combination of all three. Zines are idiosyncratic. My favorite part: there are no rules. So, now that we have established there are no rules, here are some guidelines and how I made *my zine:

6 Steps

1. Collect the items needed to create a zine:

–paper

I am learning to screen print for the first time, and anyone who has practiced screen printing knows there are less‐than‐perfect prints that result sometimes, especially in the beginning. So I am using old prints for my zine pages! Hooray! These are being put to good use. Reuse and recycle. One could also use scrap paper, printed photocopies, handmade paper, or even old envelopes.

–scissors

–dental floss (you heard me!)

–a large needle

–a pen (mark, printer, or whatever you are going to use to make marks, writing or artwork, on your zine pages)

–a paper clip

2. Mark, write and cover, your zine pages. Ideas and what has been done:

–text: essay, article, poetry

–artwork: drawings, comics, infographs

3. Fold each piece of paper and cut the folded edges

I folded both of my 5” x 7” screen prints in half and then stacked them folded on top of each other and then cut the folded edge of the paper

4. Now unfold your paper so that the cuts, or holes, of each sheet are aligned

5. If your paper is about 5” in height, cut about 3’ of floss and thread it through your large needle. If your paper is taller that 5”, cut a little more than 3’, and if your paper is shorter, cut a little less.

6. Start at the top of your sheet and penetrate the top cut with your needle.

7. Make a loop over the edges of the two sheets back through the top cut, and then zigzag through one side to another down the aligned holes.

8. Make a loop at the bottom and travel back up the aligned holes to reinforce the binding of your zine’s spine. When you only have about two inches of floss left, make a knot where you end up along the spine so that your floss is securely fashioned.

9. Fold your pages back, so that your zine is in booklet form with the spine on one edge and your zine opening on the other.

10. If needed, flatten your zine by setting something heavy on the cover until the zine is flat.

Viola! We have a zine!

Where does one find a zine?

Zines and other underground publications are hard to find or unavailable in stores, although you may be able to find zines in some libraries or at independent bookstores, especially in larger cities. The best way to find out about zines is through word of mouth and networking. For instance, I am taking a drawing class, and as my class watched a film, I quietly made my fourth zine. Some classmates saw me, and we began talking about zines. A friend said, “Kyle wants to start a zine club.” Then I knew: Kyle is also interest in or making zines too!

In addition, there are several publications that review zines, giving ordering information for the zine as part of their review. There are also several online communities where zine publishers network, give each other feedback, and promote their zines.

What to do with a zine after it is made?

Think about whom you want to read it and then decide where you want to put it.

Several things you could do:

–check in with the zine communities above.

–cherish it for yourself.

–send it to loved ones and friends.

–check in with your local bookstore to see if they would want to sell it for a couple dollars, the going rate.

–check in with your local library to see if you could set it on a table or display rack. Maybe they have a zine archive or collection!

–trade your zine for another publisher’s zine. You are both publishers – and proud self‐publishers at that!

Lots of zine publishers trade their zines! You want to trade?! Shoot me an email at lucca@ghostnest.com, tweet at us, or write on our wall. OR post a photo here! We would love to see *your zine!

P.S. Here is a great video of a guy giving a zine tutorial. His zine is different from mine, reinforcing that your zine can be and look however you want it. THERE ARE NO RULES.

Peace, love, and zine joy,

Lucca

Bi-Ology Submissions!

Hello Everyone!  Please do not forget that Bi-Ology Zine: The Literary Magazine for Bisexuals is accepting submissions until Wednesday.  Do not forget to submit to the zine at bi.ology.zine@gmail.com or through the website.  If you aren’t sure about a topic or a piece that you want to submit, you can always ask me and I will get back to you!  We need submissions, though, so please don’t be afraid to send in work!

If you haven’t already checked out the zine prospects, please do. :)



Building a Better NYC Zine Community

After a controversy at the Brooklyn Zine Fest sparked discussions on white privilege, accessibility and politics in NYC zine culture, a group of New York-based zine makers decided it was crucial to continue this conversation beyond the festival. We want to figure out ways of preventing similar incidents in the future, and of creating the kind of community we want to be a part of. To that end, we’ve started scheduling open discussions on all these issues, and we want you to come share your thoughts with us!

How do we ensure the visibility of people of color and other marginalized groups? How do we maximize accessibility and avoid exclusion? How do we create more democratic DIY institutions that are representative of and responsive to the communities in which they reside?

Let’s talk about our criticisms, needs, and desires, and brainstorm how to build a better NYC zine culture.

Get involved and sign up here:

http://facebook.us10.list-manage2.com/subscribe?u=939c4f6b6977d206521e6e167&id=8518ffe863

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Day 1 of #CZF2015 was amazing! We had a fantastic opening panel, with moderator Jenna Freedman and panelists Ocean Capewell, Julia Eff, and Jonas discussing the nature of zines, the importance of community (and snail mail!), and their own aesthetic choices. Thanks to each of them! 

The youth readers were fabulous, with poems about french fries, Mother’s Day, lightning, and thunder, as well as an excerpt from a perzine about high school crushes.

We finished strong with the exhibitor readers: Annie Mok, Celia Pérez, Martha Grover, Matt Davis, H. Melt, and Mimi Thi Nguyen. Topics included identity, community, sexuality, Forever 21, investigating for insurance fraud, “adolescent spiritual violence”, and Sonic the Hedgehog. If you weren’t there, you missed out on a great night!

We’re looking forward to another excellent day tomorrow at Plumbers’ Union Hall!!

make all good things fall apart: zine launch and community discussion on addiction, intoxication culture and sober spaces

“building on the momentum of the first two issues, make all good things fall apart #3 is a collaborative zine by clementine morrigan and geoff that explores intoxication culture, addiction, recovery, sobriety, harm reduction, disability justice and sober spaces through the lens of accessibility. this zine was created in halifax as part of the Inkstorm, Sad Rad and Anchor Archive Zine Library Artist Residency Program

Facebook event page: < https://www.facebook.com/events/1616733701902879/ >

#makeallgoodthingsfallapart #fromthemargins #addiction #sobriety #recovery #sober #disabilityjustice

I’ve been working on a new zine of collages.  Some old, some new.  It’s almost done.  Once it’s done, I’ll of course post some scans and whatnot.

Also, I’ve got some updates about Zine Fest Houston to post about probably, but we’re still figuring out a couple things.  So, maybe there’s only one update.  Anyway…things are going well with planning for that.  I don’t feel overwhelmed yet, which is good.  That feeling will come soon enough, I’m sure.  I feel really lucky to have found the zine community and to be involved in an organization like Zine Fest Houston.  I wish it were possible to do all the things that we want to do, but sometimes it’s hard.  We are trying though.  That’s all that matters.

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Photography I have taken in the past that relates to my brand, the photos can be edited and interpreted onto my zine to promote / communicate my brand that is M9. I feel that these bit of photography are powerful in itself.

anonymous asked:

where can I see your previous zines? such as the communication zine?

Unfortunately the communication zine has been put to a halt but it may possibly be continued in the future. 

thanks so much for caring :’)

Living in the UK? Concerned about conflict palm-oil? We have big news – today we launch Selva Beat UK !

We’re kicking off this somewhat crazy expansion with a forum space where you can safely and easily discuss all things palm-oil related like palm-oil free products, recipes, and news. You can even log in with Facebook, too.

Welcome to your new community!

This looks like a great event!! From the facebook event:

After a recent controversy surrounding the Brooklyn Zine Fest cutting a #BlackLivesMatter panel, many NYC zine-makers are wondering how to prevent similar incidents and how to create the kind of community we want to be a part of.

How do we ensure the visibility of people of color, maximize accessibility, democratize our DIY institutions, and more? Let’s talk about our criticisms, needs, and desires, and brainstorm how to build a better NYC zine culture.

Also, speaking with total and unabashed bias, Bluestockings is a fantastic space and a wonderful community to get involved with. If you haven’t been by, this would be a great first impression!