zenzie

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In 1888 actress Ellen Terry performed the role of Lady Macbeth at London’s Lyceum Theatre while wearing an awesome green gown bedecked with the 1,000 sloughed-off wings of the jewel beetle. It quickly became one of the most celebrated costumes of the Victorian era, immortalized in a portrait painted by John Singer Sargent.

126 years is a long time and over the years Dame Terry’s dress experienced all sorts of wear and tear and numerous alterations. But after 1,300 hours of painstaking work over and £50,000 ($81,000) in expenses, this magnificent costume has been restored to its original glory.

Work began on the gown two years ago after a successful fundraising campaign, but restoring the beetle wings wasn’t the most difficult task. “We had collected the beetle wings that had fallen off over the years,” says Paul Meredith, house manager at Smallhythe Place, where the dress now resides, “so that the conservator was able to reattach many of the originals, plus others that had been donated to us—1,000 in total.” The restoration team patched the 100 or so broken wings using small pieces of Japanese tissue and wheat starch paste.

Click here to read more about the restoration process.

Photos by Zenzie Tinker

[via Morbid Anatomy and Ecouterre]

Have some art slump art.

Tundra Dragon Zenzie in early while an adolescent.

Head Canons for Tundras: as the male matures their rack becomes larger. Older males have impressive sharp pronged racks with which to clash and posture at competing males during mating season. Each year the soft velvet coats the bone before rubbing off in a gory mess.