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Trailer for the long-awaited film adaptation of Marguerite Abouet’s Aya de Yopougon, a series of six graphic novels about a young woman’s life in a working-class neighbourhood in Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire, with illustrations by Clément Ouberie.

"Welcome to Yopougon, a working-class neighborhood of Abidjan in the late 70s, renamed Yop City – to sound like an American movie! This is home to Aya and her two friends, Adjoua and Bintou. The’re 19-years-old, a time in your life when everything seems possible. But while Aya would like to become a doctor one day, her friends are more into nightclubbing at the local "maquis" and hunting for a husband. Around this dynamic trio, we cross characters with diverse destinies like Ignace, Aya’s runaround father who juggles several "offices", and Moussa, the son of the powerful Bonaventure Sissoko who counts on his Toyota to pick up girls. There’s also Fanta and Koro, the mothers who try to protect their daughters. Or Grégoire, the "Parisian" who blows his cash at the famous hotel Ivoire.
A true chorale comedy, Aya of Yop City is a chronicle of an unexpected Africa, modern and urban.”

The film opens in France on 24 July 2013.

Follow the project via facebook

Trailer for the long-awaited film adaptation of Marguerite Abouet’s Aya de Yopougon, a series of six graphic novels about a young woman’s life in a small Ivorian town with illustrations by Clément Ouberie.

“Welcome to Yopougon, a working-class neighborhood of Abidjan in the late 70s, renamed Yop City – to sound like an American movie! This is home to Aya and her two friends, Adjoua and Bintou. The’re 19-years-old, a time in your life when everything seems possible. But while Aya would like to become a doctor one day, her friends are more into nightclubbing at the local “maquis” and hunting for a husband. Around this dynamic trio, we cross characters with diverse destinies like Ignace, Aya’s runaround father who juggles several “offices”, and Moussa, the son of the powerful Bonaventure Sissoko who counts on his Toyota to pick up girls. There’s also Fanta and Koro, the mothers who try to protect their daughters. Or Grégoire, the “Parisian” who blows his cash at the famous hotel Ivoire.
A true chorale comedy, Aya of Yop City is a chronicle of an unexpected Africa, modern and urban.”

Follow on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Aya-de-Yopougon/98058886870

VIEW TRAILER BELOW:

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La Premiere bande-annonce pour le film d’animation Aya De Yopougon.

The movie sprung from the animated series written by Marguerite Abouet, illustrated by Clement Oubrerie, and edited by Gallimard in the collection of Bayou of Joann Sfar. The adapted (animated) movie is set to be released in July 17th 2013, in France, by Autochenille Production. 

The series takes place in Yopougon, the most vibrant neighborhood of the city of Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire. It relates the tales and daily life of Aya, her friends, family, and foes through exiting images and emotion-filled dialogues that are very familiar to the people of Cote d’Ivoire, more likely to the residents of Yopougon. A lot can happen in the city of Yopougon, or Yop-City,  including drama, romance, tragedy, humor, and etc. And from the looks of it, the series has made a fantastic work in representing just about that. 

The Editor.

Great #African #animation #feature set in the #ivory #coast. In the middle is Aya, studious girl with no time for unserious men. Just behind her are her two friends who live to party and to marry rich guys! Just behind then are ‘moussa’ on the left-rich mans son and ‘mamadou’, the local ladies man. The #film sees the area of #yopougon through the eyes of Aya and the intersection of the lives of these various characters set to the lovely sounds of #West #African #Francophone #music

Part 3: Another 10 Animated Movies Beyond Pixar

Part 1: Animation Beyond Pixar
Part 2: 10 More Animated Movies Beyond Pixar

Before you start: I’d like to apologize for the terrible quality in a few of these screenshots. A few of the older/less successful movies are impossible to find in HD. With that, let’s get started! I hope you find something cool!

Sword of the Stranger (Stranja Mukōhadan, 2007)

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It’s easy to forget what a good action movie looks like, and even easier to forget that there used to be action movies with actual grit, where the characters aren’t too clever to be fooled or hurt. Sword of the Stranger is both a good action movie and is absolutely caked in grit.

You won’t find many technical innovations in this Sword of the Stranger, and though the styling is beautiful in an austere way it’s definitely not a piece of glittering eye candy. That said, you will immediately be absorbed by its interesting characters and engrossing plot. It’s a testament to the power of good character development and satisfying plot progression/resolution, traits that animated movies often stumble over.

A young boy living among monks escapes as his home monastery is burned to the ground. Pursued by a band of elite Chinese warriors with mysterious motives, the boy runs across a disgraced samurai and strikes a deal for protection.

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The Painting (Le Tableau, 2011)

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(This movie is currently available on Netflix US!)

Part of the reason many 3D animated movies are terrible is their sheer banality. Too many of them are about small animals doing something silly for poorly-established reasons (coughDREAMWORKScough). That’s why it’s so incredibly refreshing when a small studio goes for novelty, and turns their creativity towards describing a fascinating premise.

The Painting is an undeniably gorgeous movie, where CGI is turned towards emulating different styles of paintings in really successful and interesting ways.

An unfinished painting sits, abandoned, in an artist’s tiny cabin. Inside the painting the figures have created a stratified culture made up of Alldunns, Halfies, and Scribbles. The only thing that sustains the Halfies and the Scribbles is the idea that their creator might return to complete the painting, but hope is fading fast. With mounting oppression from the Alldunns a Halfie, a Scribble, and a sympathetic Alldunn set out to find their creator, to ask him to finish their painting.

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The Story of Mr. Sorry (Je-bool-chal-ssi I-ya-gi, 2008)

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(This movie is currently available on Netflix US!)

Korea’s animation industry is weird. There’s a huge talent pool that regularly produces amazing work, but almost all of it is in the service of American TV shows. Stuff like Young Justice and Legend of Korra are largely designed and animated in South Korea. There’s very little by-and-for Korean animation available, and what is available is often indie (which means that giant talent pool usually isn’t involved).

The Story of Mr. Sorry is one of those indie movies. A dark fantasy animated with cut-out drawings (which, if anything, are vaguely reminiscent of Monty Python, no anime-styling here). The movie is cerebral, sometimes very literally. In tone and substance it’s a bit like Being John Malkovich, kind of quirky, depressive, and willfully weird.

A timid young man is shrunk to the size of a spider and works as an ear-cleaner. While cleaning ears he discovers that he can delve into peoples’ subconscious.

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Heavy Metal (1981)

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I love this ridiculous movie. Here’s what you need to know: Heavy Metal was produced by the publishers of Heavy Metal magazine, a British sci-fi/fantasy comics magazine started in the 70s that still runs today. Heavy Metal magazine publishes an extremely specific form of fantasy comic, which is a bit hard to describe. Imagine if Conan the Barbarian fought cyber-goblins in the old west.

The first thing you’ll notice is that there’s almost nothing good about this movie. Choppy animation, horrible voice acting, bad action, bad storytelling. Critical fails all around. The second thing you’ll notice is that it’s so completely, wonderfully ridiculous that you have to keep watching. There’s also an inexplicably good soundtrack with cuts from Black Sabbath, Devo, Grand Funk Railroad, Blue Oyster Cult, and many more. All of this has made Heavy Metal kind of an animated version of The Rocky Horror Picture Show. The film has always had a cult following, but it really found its audience once it started being used at midnight movie screenings, with people acting along to the ridiculously juvenile stories.

I’m not even going to try to describe the story here. There’s an orb that invades a house for some reason, then a lady who rides a flying horse-thing has to fight a cyborg, then a nerd turns into a body builder so he can beat up horny orcs… It’s just great.

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Waltz with Bashir (Vals Im Bashir, 2008)

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This is an incredible, sobering movie, and an impressive re-entry into feature-length animation for Israel. The style is impeccable, looking exactly like someone brought an inky, moody comic book to life, in spite of frequent photographic & 3D-rendered backgrounds & effects. Equally-impressive is that not one frame of the movie was rotoscoped, even though you’d swear it was given the incredibly natural movement of the characters.

It’s also a documentary.

Filmmaker Ari Folman meets an old friend for a drink. While catching up his friend relates an disturbing, war-related dream to Ari, which in turn makes Ari realize that he has blanked out his entire time as an Israeli soldier during the 1982 Lebanon war. Later that night Ari has an inexplicable dream regarding his time in Beirut. Unsettled, Ari begins talking to friends, members of his old combat unit, war journalists, and psychiatrists in an attempt to understand the dream, which seems to be related to the gruesome Sabra and Shatila massacre.

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Roujin Z (Rōjin Zetto, 1991)

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The early-90s were an odd time for anime, sort of a lull between the giant anime boom of the late 80s and its resurgence via licensed manga properties in the late-90s. It’s always fun to see what an entertainment industry does when the public stopped paying attention. Usually because lots of really innovative and strange ideas manage to seep through the studio filters in that situation. That was definitely the case with Roujin Z, which is somehow an action-comedy about a bedridden old man. Smart and darkly-funny, Roujin Z plays out like the most satisfying kind of satire.

In the near-future the Ministry of Public Welfare unveils its new innovation in senior-care: a robotic, artificially-intelligent hospital bed that can bathe, clothe, feed, and entertain its occupant. However, not everything about the bed is as it seems, and when it goes haywire it sets off a mad-dash between government agencies to contain the situation.

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Fierro (sometimes Martín Fierro, 2007)

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Based on a pair of epic poems by Argentinian writer José Hernández, the story of Martín Fierro is considered an indispensable touchstone for Argentinian national identity.

The titular (and fictitious) Martín Fierro is a poor goucho, an everyman who is unjustly conscripted by a Spanish governor to defend a frontier outpost against native attacks. Fierro’s fearsome sense of independence and open rebellion against his Spanish commanding officers made him an instant folk hero in 1890s Argentina.

That sense of national pride really comes through in this production, with a lot of gorgeous background paintings and a really lovingly-crafted score giving the movie a suitably epic, sweeping feel. That said, there are a few problems. Fierro’s simplistic character designs and oddly-placed comedic bits give the movie tonal problems, which the dramatic soundtrack can sometimes exacerbate. It’s sometimes unclear if Fierro wants to be a grand saga or a silly spaghetti western.

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Aya of Yop City (Aya de Yopougon, 2012)

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Aya of Yop City depicts a version of Africa that is almost never seen in the west: A peaceful, rapidly-modernizing society with an emerging middle class. It’s based on a series of graphic novels by Marguerite Abouet, who in turn based the series on her own experiences growing up in 1970s Côte d’Ivoire.

This is apparently Abouet’s directorial debut, and right off the bat it is an amazing piece of visual storytelling. I actually wasn’t able to find a subtitle of this movie, but the art direction is so spot-on that I managed to glean most of the movie off of character interactions & tone.

Though the figure-movement can be a bit stiff, everything else about Aya absolutely pops. The character designs are simple but immediately charming, the backgrounds are lovingly rendered for every scene, the score is infectious, and the movie never once feels slow or boring. If this is Abouet’s debut then she’s clearly a fierce talent.

Told from the perspective of Aya, a young adult in the middle-class neighborhood of Yop City, the story follows the travails of Aya’s neighbors. Adjoua, one of Aya’s closest friends, has just discovered she’s pregnant. The father seems to be Moussa, the only son of one of the richest families in Côte d’Ivoire, and he and Adjoua are quickly married. However, when the baby is born Moussa’s domineering father starts doubting the parentage. Meanwhile Aya’s other friend, Bintou, has started dating a rich Parisian man who isn’t what he seems.

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The Thief and the Cobbler (1993)

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The Thief and the Cobbler can be viewed as the ultimate cautionary tale for animators. It stands as testament to the fact that no matter how great the creator’s pedigree, how beautiful the film, or how many amazing actors are on board, no film is safe from studio meddling.

It had a notoriously long and troubled production time, starting in 1964 and not seeing the light of day until 1993, having passed through several major production studios and ending up at a cut-rate production bond company. What was intended to be the masterpiece of veteran animator Richard Williams was drastically and haphazardly recut into a direct-to-video yawn. And it’s really our loss, the original animation in The Thief and the Cobbler is absolutely peerless. The amount of beautiful fluidity, or amazingly genuine idiosyncrasies in movement ascribed to drawings still hasn’t been equalled by a major studio.

Thankfully, TTatC got a second life in the animation underground. For years a workprint copy of the movie was circulated by animation fans, and to this day you can still find recuts of the movie on the internet, each one claiming to be closer to Williams’ original intent than the last. The best-known of these recuts is probably Garrett Gilchrist’s “The Recobbled Cut”, released in 2006. Seek it out, it is worth the effort.

The story: The Golden City is an arabesque paradise, ruled by the good King Nod. An ancient prophecy foretells that the city is guarded by three golden balls on its highest spire, and if those balls are ever removed the city will fall to warlike race of one-eyed creatures. If this should ever come to pass the city’s only hope is, “the simplest of souls with the smallest of things.” Meanwhile city-life is moving along predictably for the young cobbler Tack, until a chance encounter with a thief puts him in the clutches of the city’s scheming Vizier, Zigzag, while the thief absconds with the three golden balls.

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The Triplets of Belleville (Les Triplettes de Belleville, 2003)

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As the first French animated feature to make a splash overseas, The Triplets of Belleville has become many peoples’ gateway to Francophone animation. And no wonder, it’s a wonderful example of the power of visual storytelling, relying almost entirely on pantomime to communicate its story.

The first feature-length film of Sylvain Chomet (who you might recognize as the director of The Illusionist, another wonderful animated movie), TToB blew everyone away when it first debuted. Somehow it manages to be moody and light, silly and touching, & downtrodden but upbeat all at once. Moreover, in spite of its novel story and ample world-building, it moves along at a very brisk, immensely satisfying pace. You never once catch yourself counting the minutes, wishing the story would move along. That’s an accomplishment in a medium that often inspires self-indulgence.

Madame Souza has trained her grandson, Champion, for years to compete in the Tour de France. However, in the last leg of the race Champion is kidnapped. It’s up to Souza and her chubby dog Bruno to save him. Things look grim as the two follow Champion’s trail to the overstuffed city of Belleville, but a chance encounter with three aging music hall singers may provide the help they need.
#RCI IMAGES ALERTE - Les Routes sont toujours barrées, situation tendue camp Yopougon #tginfo #Lwili

ALERTE – Les Routes sont toujours barrées, situation tendue

Les grandes voies du camp militaire de Yopougon barrées par les pompiers.
La grande voie du secteur…

 

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Clément Oubrerie et Stéphane Melchior, Les Royaumes du Nord

COOL ULTIME, Clément Oubrerie (Aya de Yopougon) à réalisé une BD superbe des Royaumes du Nord avec Stéphane Mercier. Après la bouse de la boussole d’or en 2007, ça fait chaud à mon petit coeur.

Les dessins sont très chouettes et les ambiances superbement rendues. Mais on ne voit pas dans ce premier tome (il y en aura 3 uniquement pour le premier livre, vous suivez ?) les ours ni le Nord. 

New Article has been published on Eagle News

New Article has been published on http://www.eaglenews.ph/exclusive-scientists-tell-u-s-find-recipe-for-ebola-cure-in-survivors-blood/

Exclusive: Scientists tell U.S. - find recipe for Ebola cure in survivors’ blood

Health workers stand at an Ebola treatment unit at the main hospital of Yopougon in Abidjan October 25, 2014.


CREDIT: REUTERS/LUC GNAGO

(Reuters) – A group of scientists including three Nobel laureates in medicine has proposed that U.S. health officials chart a new path to developing Ebola drugs and vaccines by harnessing antibodies produced by survivors of the deadly outbreak.

The proposal builds on the use of “convalescent serum,” or survivors’ blood, which has been given to at least four U.S. Ebola patients who then recovered from the virus. It is based on an approach called passive immunization, which has been used since the 19th century to treat diseases such as diphtheria but has been largely surpassed by vaccination.

The scientists propose using new genetic and other technologies to find hundreds or thousands of different Ebola antibodies, determine their genetic recipe, grow them in commercial quantities and combine them into a single treatment analogous to the multi-drug cocktails that treat HIV-AIDS.

That contrasts with current drug development, which focuses on finding one molecule, or a small number, to defeat the Ebola virus that has killed nearly 5,000 people in West Africa and infected thousands more since March.

Nobel laureates David Baltimore, an expert in the molecular biology of the immune system, James Watson, co-discoverer of the double helix that is DNA, and Jim Simons, who founded hedge-fund Renaissance Technologies and was a pioneer in the quant revolution on Wall Street, are among the advocates of the idea. It was outlined in a letter that was reviewed by Reuters.

The proposal was sent to officials at the Department of Health and Human Services, including the Food and Drug Administration, to lawmakers and to biotech companies. They have not responded, said geneticist Michael Wigler of Cold Spring Harbor Lab, who wrote and gathered signatures for the position paper. The recipients did not respond to Reuters’ requests for comment or said they had no comment.

The scientists urged government leadership without offering a specific development or production plan, and it is not clear whether the idea would offer a faster track to success than current efforts.

“Government agencies, commercial manufacturers and perhaps philanthropy” must work together to form a research and development infrastructure capable of producing therapeutic antibodies, Wigler said in an interview.

Although there is no proof that blood from survivors helps Ebola patients survive, it is known that patients recover when their own blood produces enough antibodies to stop the virus.

OLD PROCESS

Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system to fight bacteria, viruses, and other invaders, from colds to measles. Giving antibodies to infected people would offer their immune systems a head start in fighting Ebola, the theory goes.

If the antibodies in survivors’ blood is genetically sequenced, they would provide a recipe for treatments, which could be produced with technologies already used to manufacture antibodies that target cancer or rheumatoid arthritis, the scientists said.

“It would cost less than $1 million to get the genetic sequences of the antibodies from people who have recovered, and then we would have an armamentarium of hundreds or even thousands of antibodies,” Wigler said.

He speculated that the idea has not gained traction before because “academics are trained to overlook the obvious.” The approach would be difficult, and “many people in this day and age are afraid to risk failure,” he said.

Ebola experts were cautious about the possibility that hundreds of anti-Ebola antibodies would prevent or cure infections.

Studies have shown that some antibodies that neutralize Ebola virus in test tubes don’t protect infected lab animals, said Dr. Thomas Geisbert of the University of Texas Medical Branch, who is working on Ebola vaccines. He also questioned whether the proposal would save time, given the need to test any antibody cocktail in both lab animals and human volunteers.

One of the most promising experimental treatments, Mapp Biopharmaceutical’s ZMapp, consists of three different antibodies produced by mice infected with Ebola. Initial research was published in 2000, but it took until this summer for a study to show that ZMapp cured Ebola-infected lab monkeys.

GlaxoSmithKline Plc (GSK.L) and Johnson & Johnson (JNJ.N) are among the drugmakers working on an Ebola vaccine. Both declined to comment on whether the antibodies proposal might be effective against Ebola.

Wigler acknowledges that none of those who have signed on to the proposal are experts on Ebola. Nor do they know how long it might take to develop a production line, get regulatory approval, and test the antibodies.

LESSON FROM DIPHTHERIA

European researchers separately are planning to test whether Ebola survivors’ serum can cure patients, starting this month. But relying on transfusions of survivors’ blood for those antibodies is a daunting task in West Africa, given the need to screen it for other diseases and ensure health workers aren’t exposed during the collection or infusion process.

By contrast, “it takes a very short time” to produce countless copies of antibody genes, said molecular biologist Michel Nussenzweig of the Rockefeller University, an expert on the immune system who was not involved in the Ebola proposal. “Hundreds are not a problem; this has been automated,” he said. However, he questioned whether hundreds would be necessary to fight Ebola.

Wigler’s answer: the Ebola virus is mutating. That might thwart an three-antibody cocktail like ZMapp, he said, but it is highly unlikely that the targets of hundreds of antibodies would all mutate. A diversity of antibodies “mimics the body’s own defenses and could overcome mutations in the virus that may develop,” he said.

Multiple antibodies is what finally worked against HIV, which causes AIDS and, like the Ebola virus, mutates rapidly.

“We should make sure we learn from HIV to take our best shot at Ebola,” Nobelist Baltimore said in an interview.