Now soaring through the air waves and wifi networks to land safely on your digital reading device is ACES HIGH illustrated and some written by George Evans. This EC Comics Library is filled from wing tip to landing equipment with aviation war stories, including the titular comic of the same name, now available digitally thanks to comiXology. As a bonus, we present a rarity: Evans’s never-before-reprinted 3-D story of World War I ace Frank Luke (in regular, easy-on-the-eyes 2-D). This volume also includes numerous Evans crime and shock stories, including “As Ye Sow…,” “…My Brother’s Keeper,” and “Cadillac Fever.” Other war stories, many done in collaboration with Harvey Kurtzman, include “Napoleon!” and “Flaming Coffins” (which Evans wrote, about the inherent perils of WW I aircraft). Like all books in the Fantagraphics EC line, Aces High features essays and notes by EC experts on these superbly crafted, classic comic book masterpieces. 

With 210 pages of adventure, this $22.99 collection of masterwork comics with thrill you. The perfect digital comics for EC fans and WWI enthusiasts during the centennial of the Great War.



All of these books are essential purchases for comics fans… These are the books that best show off how EC took genre stories seriously, striving to create comics that didn’t treat readers as naive or ignorant.” - The Los Angeles Times

”...I am not only appreciative…but also very impressed. [The books] are spectacular packages of their featured artist and their stories." - Al Feldstein

A Belgian soldier smokes a cigarette during a fight between Dendermonde and Oudegem, Belgium, in 1914. Germany had hoped for a swift victory against France, and invaded Belgium in August of 1914, heading into France. The German army swept through Belgium, but was met with stiffer resistance than it anticipated in France. The Germans approached to within 70 kilometers of Paris, but were pushed back a ways, to a more stable position, which would become battlefields lined with trenches, fought over for years. In this opening month of World War I, hundreds of thousands of soldiers and civilians were killed or wounded — France suffered its greatest single-day loss on August 22nd, when more than 27,000 soldiers were killed by rifle and machine-gun, thousands more wounded. (Bibliotheque nationale de France)

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French soldier’s room unchanged 96 years after his death in first world war

The name of dragoons officer Hubert Rochereau is commemorated on a war memorial in Bélâbre, his native village in central France, along with those of other young men who lost their lives in the first world war.

But Rochereau also has a much more poignant and exceptional memorial: his room in a large family house in the village has been preserved with his belongings for almost 100 years since his death in Belgium.

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The Paris Gun of World War I,

On the morning of March 21st, 1918 a explosion was heard across Paris.  There was neither the report of a gun nor the sight of enemy aircraft.  Over the course of the day another 20 shells exploded around Paris, with no clues left as to what had fired or dropped the explosive weapons.  At first, it was thought that the explosions were from bombs dropped from an advanced high altitude zeppelin.  However, Allied air reconnaissance plains quickly discovered what was assaulting the City of Paris.

81 miles east of Paris, a monstrous rail gun was sighted firing west.  Nicknamed the “Paris Gun”, the rail gun was a creation of the Krupp factory, famous for making big artillery pieces for the German Empire since the 1860’s.  The Paris gun originally started its existence as a worn out 15 inch naval gun mounted on a battleship, which was refurbished with inserts that reduced the caliber to 8 inches (later rebored to 10 inches).  Germany had much bigger guns in it’s arsenal, however the purpose of the Paris gun was not to have overwhelming power, but extraordinary range.  To enhance the guns range, the barrel was lengthened from 16 meters to over 34 meters.  In fact the barrel was so long that the Paris gun had to be rigged with a crane for support, lest the barrel kink under its own weight.

The performance of the Paris gun was impressive, bombarding Paris 81 miles away with 234 lb explosive shells. Its range was so great that gunners had to compensate for the Earth’s rotation (Coriolis effect) in order to fire it accurately. The maximum height of a shell’s ballistic arc reached 25 miles, thus the Paris gun holds the record for launching the first man made object into the stratosphere. Because of its lengthy barrel, the Paris gun achieved a muzzle velocity of 1,640 meters per second, or 5,400 feet per second.  Muzzle velocity was so great that the fired shells would wear away the inside of the barrel.  Gunners noticed that the Paris gun slowly increased in caliber as they were firing it.  The Germans were even able to calculate the rate at which the barrel was being worn, and to compensate, Krupp issued the gun with progressively larger caliber shells to be fired in a specific order. Krupp also supplied 7 replacement barrels as well. Altogether than gun and railway carriage weight around 256 tons.

Since it was originally a naval gun, the Paris gun was manned 80 German Imperial Navy sailors who were experienced in operating similar naval guns.  Between March 21st and August of 1918, the Paris gun fired 367 shells at a rate of roughly 20 a day.  As a result of the shelling 250 Parisians were killed and another 620 wounded.  The worst of the shelling occurred on March 31st when a shell hit the St-Gervais-et-St-Protais Church, collapsing the roof and killing 91.  While the Paris gun had a long range, it was not very accurate, firing shells at random places all over Paris.  Thus, the Paris gun was employed as a terror weapon.  In terms of its effectiveness, the Paris gun was found wanting. Excessive amounts of resources and time were needed for the gun’s maintenance. In addition, the Paris gun’s 234 lb shell was not that powerful, there were many guns in German and Allied arsenal’s which were much more destructive.  Of the 234 lb projectile, only 15 lbs of explosives could be fitted into the shell.  Thus the explosive power of the shell was minuscule compared to its weight.  While the Paris gun was a wonder to behold, or a terror weapon to be scorned, it did little to turn the tide of the war.  In August the Paris gun was withdrawn as Allied forces advanced towards Germany.  After the war the gun disappeared, although it is thought to have been destroyed for scrap metal.  

Hey everyone, Remembrance Day is coming up on the 11th of November here. Just a friendly that if you are in a public place, such as the mall for example, if the announcement for a Moment of Silence comes on, please please PLEASE respect it by stopping and standing still where you are. Please do not make any noise, or whisper and giggle to your friends while the bugle is playing. Pay your respects. It’s only two minutes of your time.

Thank you.