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Carlo Maderno died on 31 January 1629 in Rome, where he had risen to become one of city’s most important architects. Maderno is seen as a crucial link between the rather prosaic architectural style that dominated Rome at the end of the 16th century and the exciting developments of the Italian Baroque. He collaborated often and was a mentor to many, including the Baroque genius Francesco Borromini. Maderno worked on many of Rome’s major churches and palaces, as well as villas for the surrounding countryside. Among his best known works is the completion of St. Peter’s basilica, which included extending the western arm into a nave and completing the building’s facade.

Reference: Patricia Waddy. “Maderno, Carlo.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. <http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/grove/art/T052980>.

Facade, St. Peter’s Basilica, Rome, 1603-26

With Giovanni Fontana, Villa Aldobrandini, Frascati, Italy, early 17th century; image copyright Jon Bogen

Palazzo del Quirinale, Rome, 17th century; image: Alan Cole

S. Susanna, Rome, 1597–1603; photo credit: Scala/Art Resource, NY

Plan for New St. Peter’s, 1603-25

Commemorative stamp for the architect’s 400th anniversary, 1956

The Subiaco Oval is a family home designed by Luigi Rosselli Architects and is located in Subiaco, Western Australia.

Viewed from the street this unassuming family home hides a secret; a cluster of interconnected pavilions with an oval courtyard garden at their centre.
The publicly visible faces of the pavilions, aligned with the square geometry of the level block of land, are respectfully attuned to homogeneous character of the early 1900s federation era Subiaco streetscape – one of the best preserved suburbs in Perth – in the small scale of their pitched rooves, the updated interpretation of the traditional veranda that surrounds them, and the criss-cross pattern formed in the brickwork reclaimed from the dilapidated buildings that previously occupied the plot. This commitment to ensuring the new building’s façade is sympathetic with its period surroundings has led to it being enthusiastically adopted by the neighbourhood, yet stepping through the front entrance reveals this home to be anything but square.
The elliptical courtyard, which runs diagonally through heart of the house from the front door to the back gate, is the focal point of the home in terms of both design and use. The courtyard divides the bedrooms from the living space with the entrance hall in the centre. From the entry one can view the whole courtyard with the living and bedroom wings flanking it, it is a very intimate and private space, minimally landscaped with a lawn, enhanced by a couple of mature growth trees existing on the block.
Externally the oval is bordered by another veranda with its Jarrah timber deck set at seat height, which provides the family with a theatrical open space to play and entertain that is visible and easily accessible from wherever they are in the house. It also showcases some of the more contemporary elements of the building in details such as the Luigi Rosselli Architects designed profiled aluminium wall cladding to the veranda and vertical sun shade louvres. Internally the courtyard lends its form to the surrounding buildings in the curves of the connecting corridors and partition glass panelling.
The interiors of the house reflect the constructive tension in its timeless aspects such as the pitched roof forms, enhanced with exposed timber trusses and painted tongue and groove lining boards, small paned windows and traditional French doors, with the more modern materials such as the polished concrete and black steel fire surrounds, contemporary joinery finishes and Scandinavian furniture.
Photography: © Edward Birch

The Subiaco Oval by Luigi Rosselli Architects The Subiaco Oval is a family home designed by Luigi Rosselli Architects and is located in Subiaco, Western Australia.

The Villa Extramuros was designed by Vora Arquitectura and built in Arraiolos, a small city north of Evora, the Capital of Alentejo, the largest province of Portugal well known for its unspoiled beautiful nature, historical treasures and quiet lifestyle.

Villa Extramuros by Vora Arquitectura The Villa Extramuros was designed by Vora Arquitectura and built in Arraiolos, a small city north of Evora, the Capital of Alentejo, the largest province of Portugal well known for its unspoiled beautiful nature, historical treasures and quiet lifestyle.