venky's

Trickable owners (a list for future reference)

Brother: Yeah, financially there is no real way to get rid of him. You need another Roman to trick.

Me: Potential owners who seem trickable (a list for future reference):

Venky's the Menace

Jealousy runs rife within football. Fans laughing at other clubs’ misfortunes as well as disparaging botched takeovers and transfers are actions rooted in envy - they all begin with a sense of hope and promise for a team that is not yours. Blackburn felt the full weight of these afflictions last season and continue to do so today. Others’ jealousy at the prospect of investment and big-name signings for the club then turned into pity for the plight of Steve Kean. Now today, like a contagious disease, Blackburn pose the threat of not only harming themselves but those around them too. 

With a lavish carrot but over-used stick Blackburn’s Indian owners Venky’s have replaced two managers within three months. Kean and Henning Berg made ignominious exits while irresponsible and foolish have become epithets for the club’s executive decision-makers. Their unpredictable ways have become less and less interesting for the footballing public, rendering their actions into quite the opposite: expected. In football, a wager on ineptitude and folly is much more likely to pay out than one on brilliance.

  An unenviable fate - one that is only pitied once there exists no threat to a fan’s own interests. Try telling that to Blackpool. “There is no animosity” Tangerines chairman, Karl Oyston, proclaimed as Ian Holloway left for Crystal Palace. Considering their thrilling Play-off victory and consequent Premier League adventure, Oyston’s words are understandable. Thesearch for a replacement took only four days as Michael Appleton signed.

Aboard the sinking ship that was Portsmouth, Appleton could not have been given a harder vessel to steer. Financial turmoil contrasted greatly with his humble and diligent attitude, overshadowing any tactical feebleness. Little expense and Manchester United pedigree were the stand out features on Appleton’s CV and clearly enough to persuade Blackpool.

But 66 days was all it took for Blackburn to begin inflicting their havoc on others. Appleton replaced Berg, Blackpool on the manager hunt again. Rejection at their first approach must only have been down to a lack in compensation - a matter quickly resolved with Venky’s financial clout. To throw their weight around a league in which most clubs endeavour to stay in the black is reprehensible. It is doubtful Blackpool will be the last club to suffer at the hands of such arrogance and boisterousness but nevertheless, a pattern that must be avoided. Blackburn’s implosion is in no way welcomed but when the debris starts to take others down with them such terrible ownership is at its worst.  

Few will imagine a scenario in which Appleton lasts a significant time in charge. Perhaps it is the lack of criticism for owners he demonstrated at Portsmouth that Venky’s are after. They’ll need someone fighting their corner, or at least not condemning them, if this behaviour continues. 

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Nee dheham lo praanam la velige kaanthi naa navve ani
Nee gundello palike naadham naa pedhavi pai murali ani
Thelusuko galige thelivi Neekundhe
Theralu tholagisthe velugu vasthundhe
Thom thakita thaka tharikita tharikita


The soul within you is nothing but my smile
Heartbeat of yours is nothing but sound of my flute
You’re smart enough to know that
Move the veil and light rays would fall in place

Garmi Di Tu Song Lyrics By Sanam Puri

Garmi Di Tu Song Lyrics By Sanam Puri

SANAM Band’s New Song “Garmi Di Tu” Lyrics: A valentine’s day special, This one is a Punjabi romantic/love song featuring the band members.

Vocals: Sanam Puri
Lyrics: Siddhant Kaushal
Guitars: Samar Puri
Bass: Venky S
Drums: Keshav Dhanraj
Download MP3
Garmi Di Tu Song Lyrics By Sanam Puri

Garmi di tu
Garmi di tu
Chaavaan vargi
Garmi di tu.. (x2)

Zindagi meri
Zindagi na si
Jalde seene nu
De gayi…

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New Post has been published on http://www.newfilmstills.com/moone-moonu-vaarthai-is-a-hikoo.html

Moone Moonu Vaarthai is a ‘hikoo’

‘Moone Moonu Vaarthai’, the youthful film from Capital Film Works is nearing completion. Director Madhumitha who has already proved her film making skills with Vallamai Tharayo and Kola Kolaya Mundirika is directing the bilingual film. The film’s cast is a medley of experienced and newbie like S P Balasubramaniam, Lakshmi, K Bhakiyaraj , debutant Arjun, ‘Suttakathai’ Venky , Aditi Chengappa.

The legendary singer S P Balasubramaniam is quiet happy to recollect his experience in working with the youngsters and Lakshmi once again. “After the success of our Telugu film Mithunam, the director saw myself and Lakshmi will be an apt elderly couple to share screen for ‘Moone Moonu Vaarthai’. It was actually parent couple earlier, Madhumitha changed the script for us and re-molded to grandparents. It was not easy task to act under Madhumitha. She knows what should be done on screen and the level. This was more of experience and a process of learning from the new generation people than acting.” Says the Guinness record holder with a humble.

“Music Director Karthigeya Murthy has done a Brilliant Key Work with music and I was overjoyed to know that is was the Grandson of senior most Mirudhangam player Moorthy.his scintillating chords and notes has played a major role in elevating the movie.“When I was singing the track Vaazhum Naal the lyrics and rendition of Karthigeyan made me into tears. After all I’m a father in real life. It is a different genre of commercial Movies .to put that in simple Words Moone moone varthai is an “Hikoo”. I feel very proud of Producer SP Charan who is making many youngsters to achieve their dreams. I wish the team ‘Moone Moonu Vaarthai’ a very great future’. Says the ever melancholic Singer SP Balasubramaniam.

Tags : S P Balasubramaniam In Moone Moonu Vaarthai Photos, Moone Moonu Vaarthai Movie New Stills, Moone Moonu Vaarthai Latest Movie Gallery, Moone Moonu Vaarthai Movie Photos, Moone Moonu Vaarthai New Film Pictures

Moone Moonu Vaarthai is a ‘hikoo’
Source: searchtamilmovies.com

Ladies and Gentlemen, We Have a Diversity Problem
As I stepped to the stage at the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson’s 18th Annual Rainbow PUSH Wall Street Project Economic Summit to be part of a panel discussion about the need for more diversity in the venture capital industry in front of an audience of primarily African American business owners, it was not lost on me that I am a middle-aged white male and that everyone else on the panel was white as well.



That’s more or less the issue, isn’t it? Nearly 90 percent of all venture capital professionals are Caucasian men. It’s the kind of “sameness” that industry experts like Vivek Wadhwa (Stanford University), Venky Ganesan (Menlo Ventures) and Kara Swisher (Re/code) cautioned about during last year’s National Venture Capital Association (NVCA) annual conference in May 2014.

Like Rev. Jackson, these experts are not interested in mincing words about the venture industry’s collective diversity problem, nor should they be. Inspired by their voices and a greater understanding of the benefits of diversity through the entire venture ecosystem, the NVCA has launched a Diversity Task Force, of which I am proud to be a member. Our goal is to increase the opportunities for women and men of diverse backgrounds to play a larger role in the venture capital ecosystem as venture capital investors, venture-backed entrepreneurs or employees of venture-backed companies.

To make these goals a reality we need to do a much better job of ensuring a more diverse set of people have a clear understanding of the entire venture ecosystem. We must also build and expand the pipeline of people and opportunities that are connected to the industry and commit ourselves to tracking our progress with annual data gathering. Finally, we must begin connecting to promising initiatives that share our goals.

It was this thinking that led me to Rev. Jackson’s summit, where my presence was much more about listening than it was about speaking.


Diversity is a Competitive Advantage
The only way the U.S. will lead the 21st century global economy in growth and innovation is to use all of our available assets. Any industry - including venture capital - dominated by one race or one gender leaves way too many people out of the work and fails to maximize its economic outcomes. If this remains the case in the venture capital industry, it will never be as strong or innovative as it should be.

At JumpStart, we invest in and support entrepreneurs in Northeast Ohio. As we go about our work, we pride ourselves on thinking about diversity not as “charity” or “public relations,” but as a core building block that is absolutely essential to the health of our regional community and country. We believe optimized economies prioritize and require diversity. We need all hands on deck as we continue to mount our community and our country’s economic comeback, much of which is being driven by entrepreneurs.

More than 30 percent of the early-stage companies we advise and or invest in at JumpStart are minority/women owned-or-led. To date we have worked with hundreds of women and minority entrepreneurs, who have gone on to raise more than $180 million in capital and recently generated nearly $55 million in revenue while creating more than 280 direct jobs in and around Cleveland.


But true diversity goes beyond investment portfolios. That’s why everyone at JumpStart is responsible for creating their own personal inclusion goals, which are tied directly to our overall performance as an organization. We refer to this idea as “embedded inclusion,” and while it may sound simple, it requires a great deal of commitment and action. In some cases, it also requires a new way of thinking and acting for white guys like me, particularly when leading an organization that connects with almost every aspect and element of our broader community.

Hiring policies, board leadership, vendor selection, program-planning, etc. Everything we do at JumpStart is informed by the importance of diversity. We demand from each other a good-faith effort to make inclusion a part of our daily routine and we hold each other accountable to our individual and collective outcomes.

We are certainly not perfect in this effort; but we work very hard to make diversity a part of the way we do business. For nearly every possible reason you can think of - including economic competitiveness and organizational performance - this commitment is fundamentally the right thing to do.


The First Step is the Hardest
As we march forward as a nation to face this challenge and opportunity, the concepts of fairness and equality will rightfully continue to grow in our country’s collective conscience. If the venture capital ecosystem desires to stay relevant, it is crucial that the NVCA takes a leadership role around finding new and better ways to understand, discuss and maximize our diversity opportunities.

A new orientation around inclusion is the way forward and the creation of the NVCA Diversity Task Force is a significant first step in the right direction. The task force will not solve these challenges overnight, but we will ask tough questions, build new partnerships and make real progress in the months and years to come.

Fortunately, the future already appears to be in our favor. The same studies that give the venture ecosystem such alarmingly low diversity statistics are also seeing clear evidence that younger generations of investment professional and employees of venture-backed companies are becoming increasingly more diverse. As it often goes, we can learn a lot by simply following the examples of our children and grandchildren.

As for this middle-aged white guy, I am excited about the potential progress our Diversity Task Force can make. Our work is just getting started.

To keep up with the NVCA Diversity Task Force, visit www.nvca.org.


Ladies and Gentlemen, We Have a Diversity Problem
As I stepped to the stage at the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson’s 18th Annual Rainbow PUSH Wall Street Project Economic Summit to be part of a panel discussion about the need for more diversity in the venture capital industry in front of an audience of primarily African American business owners, it was not lost on me that I am a middle-aged white male and that everyone else on the panel was white as well.



That’s more or less the issue, isn’t it? Nearly 90 percent of all venture capital professionals are Caucasian men. It’s the kind of “sameness” that industry experts like Vivek Wadhwa (Stanford University), Venky Ganesan (Menlo Ventures) and Kara Swisher (Re/code) cautioned about during last year’s National Venture Capital Association (NVCA) annual conference in May 2014.

Like Rev. Jackson, these experts are not interested in mincing words about the venture industry’s collective diversity problem, nor should they be. Inspired by their voices and a greater understanding of the benefits of diversity through the entire venture ecosystem, the NVCA has launched a Diversity Task Force, of which I am proud to be a member. Our goal is to increase the opportunities for women and men of diverse backgrounds to play a larger role in the venture capital ecosystem as venture capital investors, venture-backed entrepreneurs or employees of venture-backed companies.

To make these goals a reality we need to do a much better job of ensuring a more diverse set of people have a clear understanding of the entire venture ecosystem. We must also build and expand the pipeline of people and opportunities that are connected to the industry and commit ourselves to tracking our progress with annual data gathering. Finally, we must begin connecting to promising initiatives that share our goals.

It was this thinking that led me to Rev. Jackson’s summit, where my presence was much more about listening than it was about speaking.


Diversity is a Competitive Advantage
The only way the U.S. will lead the 21st century global economy in growth and innovation is to use all of our available assets. Any industry - including venture capital - dominated by one race or one gender leaves way too many people out of the work and fails to maximize its economic outcomes. If this remains the case in the venture capital industry, it will never be as strong or innovative as it should be.

At JumpStart, we invest in and support entrepreneurs in Northeast Ohio. As we go about our work, we pride ourselves on thinking about diversity not as “charity” or “public relations,” but as a core building block that is absolutely essential to the health of our regional community and country. We believe optimized economies prioritize and require diversity. We need all hands on deck as we continue to mount our community and our country’s economic comeback, much of which is being driven by entrepreneurs.

More than 30 percent of the early-stage companies we advise and or invest in at JumpStart are minority/women owned-or-led. To date we have worked with hundreds of women and minority entrepreneurs, who have gone on to raise more than $180 million in capital and recently generated nearly $55 million in revenue while creating more than 280 direct jobs in and around Cleveland.


But true diversity goes beyond investment portfolios. That’s why everyone at JumpStart is responsible for creating their own personal inclusion goals, which are tied directly to our overall performance as an organization. We refer to this idea as “embedded inclusion,” and while it may sound simple, it requires a great deal of commitment and action. In some cases, it also requires a new way of thinking and acting for white guys like me, particularly when leading an organization that connects with almost every aspect and element of our broader community.

Hiring policies, board leadership, vendor selection, program-planning, etc. Everything we do at JumpStart is informed by the importance of diversity. We demand from each other a good-faith effort to make inclusion a part of our daily routine and we hold each other accountable to our individual and collective outcomes.

We are certainly not perfect in this effort; but we work very hard to make diversity a part of the way we do business. For nearly every possible reason you can think of - including economic competitiveness and organizational performance - this commitment is fundamentally the right thing to do.


The First Step is the Hardest
As we march forward as a nation to face this challenge and opportunity, the concepts of fairness and equality will rightfully continue to grow in our country’s collective conscience. If the venture capital ecosystem desires to stay relevant, it is crucial that the NVCA takes a leadership role around finding new and better ways to understand, discuss and maximize our diversity opportunities.

A new orientation around inclusion is the way forward and the creation of the NVCA Diversity Task Force is a significant first step in the right direction. The task force will not solve these challenges overnight, but we will ask tough questions, build new partnerships and make real progress in the months and years to come.

Fortunately, the future already appears to be in our favor. The same studies that give the venture ecosystem such alarmingly low diversity statistics are also seeing clear evidence that younger generations of investment professional and employees of venture-backed companies are becoming increasingly more diverse. As it often goes, we can learn a lot by simply following the examples of our children and grandchildren.

As for this middle-aged white guy, I am excited about the potential progress our Diversity Task Force can make. Our work is just getting started.

To keep up with the NVCA Diversity Task Force, visit www.nvca.org.




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