Cecil Williams in the 1950s - and today. I am taking the liberty of posting Mr. Williams again so people can see him now. From my original post: I thought about this searing, beautiful picture today in light of recent events in the United States. I, like many others, shared it a few years ago on my blog, but it was only today that I finally found the name of the man in the photograph! His name is Cecil Williams and, he happens to be a photographer himself. The photo was probably taken by Mr. Williams mentor, John Goodwin, who joined him for a talk at Richland Library in Columbia, South Carolina in September 2013 about their experiences as black photographers in South Carolina during Jim Crow and the Civil Rights era. Mr. Williams, an Orangeburg, South Carolina native was a correspondent for Jet Magazine when he was only 15 and made national news after shooting some crucial pictures after the 1968 Orangeburg Massacre. This picture of Mr. Williams currently hangs over the water fountain on the Garden level of the Richland Library in Columbia, South Carolina.

"Education begins at the home. You can’t blame the school for not putting into your child what you don’t put into him." - Geoffrey Holder. The legendary dancer Carmen de Lavallade shared this beautiful photo on her Facebook page of her husband, the legendary dancer, actor, painter and director Geoffrey Holder with their son, Leo. While I understand that Mr. Holder is retired, Ms. Carmen de Lavallade is still performing masterfully today! Her latest show, “As I Remember It” will have its world premiere at Jacob’s Pillow in Massachusetts in June 2014 and will tour nationally through 2015. You can visit her website for more information. http://www.carmendelavallade.com/current/ 

I thought about this searing, beautiful picture today in light of recent events in the United States. I, like many others, shared it a few years ago on my blog, but it was only today that I finally found the name of the man in the photograph! His name is Cecil Williams and, he happens to be a photographer himself. The photo was probably taken by Mr. Williams mentor, John Goodwin, who joined him for a talk at Richland Library in Columbia, South Carolina in September 2013 about their experiences as black photographers in South Carolina during Jim Crow and the Civil Rights era. Mr. Williams, an Orangeburg, South Carolina native was a correspondent for Jet Magazine when he was only 15 and made national news after shooting some crucial pictures after the 1968 Orangeburg Massacre. This picture of Mr. Williams currently hangs over the water fountain on the Garden level of the Richland Library in Columbia, South Carolina.

I thought I’d share one more picture from this extraordinary collection that will soon be featured in an exhibition in London. I think some of these fabulous vintage Black people, like boxing champion Peter Jackson, are worthy of their own movie. Where are you Idris Elba? Jamie Foxx? From The Guardian:

"Peter Jackson, December 2, 1889. Born in 1860 in St Croix, then the Danish West Indies, Jackson was a boxing champion who spent long periods of time touring Europe. In England, he staged the famous fight against Jem Smith at the Pelican Club in 1889. In 1888 he claimed the title of Australian heavyweight champion. Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty Images.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Harry Belafonte share a good laugh together. Dr. King was born 85 years ago today in Atlanta, Georgia. This photo was released by Alfred A. Knopf in 2012 upon the publication of Mr. Belafonte’s memoir, “My Song.” Mr. Belafonte always put his money where his mouth was when it came to the civil rights movement. Among numerous financial commitments he made to the movement, he raised $50,000 in bail money to get Dr. King out of jail in Birmingham, Alabama.

James Baldwin, the brilliant, unapologetic literary genius, was born 90 years ago today in Harlem. A section of East 128th Street, between Fifth Avenue and Madison Avenue, will be renamed James Baldwin Way in his honor. In this photo, Mr. Baldwin is signing autographs for fans at Ludwigsburg High School in Germany, 1972. Photo: Regis Bossu/Stars and Stripes.

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Charles “Tarzan” Cooper, shown circa 1939, was a member of the New York Rens basketball team - one of the first all-Black basketball teams in the United States. All-Black teams existed up until around 1950 when the NBA integrated their teams The New-York Historical Society is sponsoring a scholarship contest that was inspired by their upcoming exhibition on The Black Fives, which is about the history of early 20th-century African American basketball teams. Photo: The Black Fives Foundation/New York Historical Society.

Happy Birthday to ya Stevie Wonder!!! My favorite musical genius was born 63 years ago today as Steveland Hardaway Judkins (his last name was later changed to Morris) in Saginaw, Michigan. In this 1974 photo, he is performing his classic “Living For The City” on “Top Of The Pops” in London. Photo: David Warner Ellis/Redferns. In the comment section, let me know what your favorite Stevie song is (Is it possible to have just one?)

Malcolm X was born Malcolm Little in Omaha, Nebraska 88 years ago today in 1925. He would later change his name to El-Hajj Malik el-Shabazz. In this photo from March 1964, he is shown with Muhammad Ali outside of the Trans-Lux Newsreel Theater in New York City after a screening of a film about Mr. Ali’s title fight with Sonny Liston. Photo: AP/Corbis.

Roland Hayes, the brilliant tenor (listen to his voice HERE!) who became the first African-American man to earn international fame as a concert vocalist, photographed by Addison Scurlock in 1940. Born to former slaves in Curryville, Georgia in 1887, he attended Fisk University and briefly toured with the Fisk Jubilee Singers. Early in his career, he was turned down by talent managers because he was Black so, he invested in himself: He raised money and arranged and financed his own concert performances,which included Negro spirituals, lieder and arias by Schubert, Tchaikovsky, and Mozart. In 1942, Mr. Hayes’s wife, Helen and daughter, Afrika, sat in a whites-only area of a shoe store and were thrown out of the store. When Mr. Hayes defended his family, he was beaten and he and his wife were arrested - and the governor of Georgia was absolutely fine with it. The incident inspired Langston Hughes to compose the poem, Roland Hayes Beaten. Mr. Hayes would later teach at Boston University and would go on to celebrate more than 50 years on the concert stage before his death in 1977.

PRE-ORDER FOR VINTAGE BLACK GLAMOUR (THE BOOK!) IS AVAILABLE NOW!http://vintageblackglamourbook.com/

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