by John Braithwaite, Hilary Charlesworth and Adérito Soares

This book offers a new approach to the extraordinary story of Timor-Leste. The Indonesian invasion of the former Portuguese colony in 1975 was widely considered to have permanently crushed the Timorese independence movement. Initial international condemnation of the invasion was quickly replaced by widespread acceptance of Indonesian sovereignty. But inside Timor-Leste various resistance networks maintained their struggle, against all odds. Twenty-four years later, the Timorese were allowed to choose their political future and the new country of Timor-Leste came into being in 2002.

This book presents freedom in Timor-Leste as an accomplishment of networked governance, arguing that weak networks are capable of controlling strong tyrannies. Yet, as events in Timor-Leste since independence show, the nodes of networks of freedom can themselves become nodes of tyranny. The authors argue that constant renewal of liberation networks is critical for peace with justice – feminist networks for the liberation of women, preventive diplomacy networks for liberation of victims of war, village development networks, civil society networks. Constant renewal of the separation of powers is also necessary. A case is made for a different way of seeing the separation of powers as constitutive of the republican ideal of freedom as non-domination.

The book is also a critique of realism as a theory of international affairs and of the limits of reforming tyranny through the centralised agency of a state sovereign. Reversal of Indonesia’s 1975 invasion of Timor-Leste was an implausible accomplishment. Among the things that achieved it was principled engagement with Indonesia and its democracy movement by the Timor resistance. Unprincipled engagement by Australia and the United States in particular allowed the 1975 invasion to occur. The book argues that when the international community regulates tyranny responsively, with principled engagement, there is hope for a domestic politics of nonviolent transformation for freedom and justice.

John Braithwaite and Hilary Charlesworth work in the Centre for International Justice and Governance, Regulatory Institutions Network, The Australian National University.

Adérito Soares is the Anti-Corruption Commissioner for Timor-Leste.

Links: ANU Press | OAPEN Library

Pre-order Tyranny of the Muse 2 In Print

Tyranny of the Muse 2 is finally in print and you can pre-order it now before it launches on October 8, 2014! And if you do, you’ll get a very exclusive, one-of-a-kind free gift. More details below.



If you pre-order Tyranny 2 right now, not only will it be signed by both myself and Jesse Balmer, but you’ll get a free, HANDWRITTEN short-short by me featuring Frank and/or Bonnie from Tyranny! Pretty cool, right? I’m gonna have one helluva sore hand. But it’ll be worth it.

This is a one-time deal, so if you don’t get in on the pre-order, you’ll miss out on the exclusive. The book will ship on October 8!


If you’re in the SF Bay Area, you can also pick up a copy of Tyranny 2 at APE on Oct 4-5. Jamaica Dyer, Jesse Balmer, and I will be there at table 907A with copies of not only Tyranny 2, but the collaborative horror zine Chrysalis by Jamaica and I, and lots of other cool stuff. Stop by.

Child Services to Mom Who Did Nothing Wrong: 'Just Don't Let Your Kids Play Outside'

Children’s book author Kari Anne Roy was recently visited by the Austin police and Child Protective Services for allowing her son Isaac, age 6, to do the unthinkable: Play outside, up her street, unsupervised.

He’d been out there for about 10 minutes when Roy’s doorbell rang. She opened it to find her son —and a woman she didn’t know. As Roy wrote on her blog HaikuMama last week, the mystery woman asked: “Is this your son?”

I nodded, still trying to figure out what was happening.

"He said this was his house. I brought him home." She was wearing dark glasses. I couldn’t see her eyes, couldn’t gauge her expression.

"You brought…"

"Yes. He was all the way down there, with no adult." She motioned to a park bench about 150 yards from my house. A bench that is visible from my front porch. A bench where he had been playing with my 8-year-old daughter, and where he decided to stay and play when she brought our dog home from the walk they’d gone on.

"You brought him home… from playing outside?" I continued to be baffled.

And then the woman smiled condescendingly, explained that he was OUTSIDE. And he was ALONE. And she was RETURNING HIM SAFELY. To stay INSIDE. With an ADULT. I thanked her for her concern, quickly shut the door and tried to figure out what just happened.

What happened? The usual. A busybody saw that rarest of sights—a child playing outside without a security detail—and wanted to teach his parents a lesson. Roy might not have given the incident a whole lot more thought except that shortly afterward, her doorbell rang again.

This time it was a policewoman. “She wanted to know if my son had been lost and how long he’d been gone,” Roy told me by phone. She also took Roy’s I.D. and the names of her kids.

That night Isaac cried when he went to bed and couldn’t immediately fall asleep. “He thought someone was going to call the police because it was past bedtime and he was still awake.”

As it turns out, he was almost right. About a week later, an investigator from Child Protective Services came to the house and interrogated each of Roy’s three children separately, without their parents, about their upbringing.

"She asked my 12 year old if he had ever done drugs or alcohol. She asked my 8-year-old daughter if she had ever seen movies with people’s private parts, so my daughter, who didn’t know that things like that exist, does now," says Roy. "Thank you, CPS."

It was only last week, about a month after it all began, that the case was officially closed. That’s when Roy felt safe enough to write about it. But safe is a relative term. In her last conversation with the CPS investigator, who actually seemed to be on her side, Roy asked, “What do I do now?”

Replied the investigator, “You just don’t let them play outside.”

There you have it. You are free to raise your children as you like, except if you want to actually give them a childhood. Fail to incarcerate your child and you could face incarceration yourself.

The Pope Has Declared a New Enemy: Capitalism

Pope Francis is once again shaking things up in the Catholic Church. On Tuesday, he issued his first “apostolic exhortation,” declaring a new enemy for the Catholic Church: modern capitalism. “Some people continue to defend trickle-down theories which assume that economic growth, encouraged by a free market, will inevitably succeed in bringing about greater justice and inclusiveness in the world,” he wrote. “This opinion, which has never been confirmed by the facts, expresses a crude and naive trust in the goodness of those wielding economic power and in the sacralized workings of the prevailing economic system.”

He couldn’t be much clearer. The pope has taken a firm political stance against right-leaning, pro-free market economic policies, and his condemnation appears to be largely pointed at Europe and the United States.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

detail of his face:

image

Please view full view!

took me forever to paint that fur I’m never praiting fur ever again until I probably play the dlc let’s be honest.

anyway, i’m really proud like…of how this turned out. I was whining and complaining all on twitter the whole time O-|-<

i hope everyone else likes this too. I’ve been trying to push myself with painting and coloring in general….i hope it is showing.

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