As many critics have pointed, out, terrorism is not an enemy. It is a tactic. Because the United States itself has a long record of supporting terrorists and using terrorist tactics, the slogans of today’s war on terrorism merely makes the United States look hypocritical to the rest of the world.

Enforcement Officials Beat & Kidnap a 12-yo Black Girl in Front of her Residence, Claiming She Was a Prostitute

"When her mother and father came outside after hearing her cries for help she was desperately holding a tree with one arm while plainclothes officers were beating her in the head, neck and throat.

Dymond Milburn, now 20-years-old, was an honor student attending advanced classes at Austin Middle School, when her life would be forever scarred by Galveston police.”

None of the enforcement officials who terrorized and beat Milburn were penalized.

Today in history: 16th Street Baptist Church bombing of 1963
September 15, 2014

The Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham was used as a meeting-place for civil rights leaders such as Martin Luther King, Ralph David Abernathy and Fred Shutterworth. Tensions became high when the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and the Congress on Racial Equality (CORE) became involved in a campaign to register African American to vote in Birmingham.

On Sunday, 15th September, 1963, a white man was seen getting out of a white and turquoise Chevrolet car and placing a box under the steps of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Soon afterwards, at 10.22 a.m., the bomb exploded killing Denise McNair (11), Addie Mae Collins (14), Carole Robertson (14) and Cynthia Wesley (14). The four girls had been attending Sunday school classes at the church. Twenty-three other people were also hurt by the blast.

Civil rights activists blamed George Wallace, the Governor of Alabama, for the killings. Only a week before the bombing he had told the New York Times that to stop integration Alabama needed a “few first-class funerals.”

A witness identified Robert Chambliss, a member of the Ku Klux Klan, as the man who placed the bomb under the steps of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. He was arrested and charged with murder and possessing a box of 122 sticks of dynamite without a permit. On 8th October, 1963, Chambliss was found not guilty of murder and received a hundred-dollar fine and a six-month jail sentence for having the dynamite.

The case was unsolved until Bill Baxley was elected attorney general of Alabama. He requested the original Federal Bureau of Investigation files on the case and discovered that the organization had accumulated a great deal of evidence against Chambliss that had not been used in the original trial.

In November, 1977 Chambliss was tried once again for the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing. Now aged 73, Chambliss was found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment. Chambliss died in an Alabama prison on 29th October, 1985.

On 17th May, 2000, the FBI announced that the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing had been carried out by the Ku Klux Klan splinter group, the Cahaba Boys. It was claimed that four men, Robert Chambliss, Herman Cash, Thomas Blanton and Bobby Cherry had been responsible for the crime. Cash was dead but Blanton and Cherry were arrested and Blanton has since been tried and convicted.

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Remembering 9/11 

I was just 11 years old when the WTC fell that symbolic day in 2001.

I remember exactly where I lived, what I was doing, what I was wearing. Heck, I even remember the color of our carpet.

It was beige. And I cringed thinking it would stain horribly when I saw my mom drop her coffee cup on the floor from where she was standing by the couch. 

I had been sitting a few feet from the TV with our new kitten, Sylvester, and my mother was watching the devestating news developing out of the US. She immediately went and called one of her co-workers and started chatting away about it on the phone. She was sad, and I just felt confused.

I was 11 — I didn’t even really think I knew what was happening! What will resonate with me forever, though, is when I heard the reporters talking about how a bunch of people were throwing themselves out of a building to avoid burning to death. I remember them saying that they would have heart attacks before they even hit the ground.

That night I had terrible nightmares.

Even if I didn’t understand it fully, a deep place in my mind sure did, and I had dreams of fire and burning.

All this fire, just blazing and smoking — Nothing else. 

I woke up scared and breathless and ran to my mom’s room, where she was sitting awake listening to a priest pray on the radio. She told me to come into the bed and listen, thinking maybe it would help. I fell asleep there, listening, and the nightmare didn’t come back.

I think we all remember where we were when the towers fell, and reminiscing on it brings sorrow to my heart. So many lives lost, yet so great of a misinterpreted legacy.

We must cherish the memory of the feelings that came with first hearing of 9/11, because they are ones we would feel all the time without the dedicated service of both our men and women in uniform, and the first responders that protect our communities every day.

The pictures above show people contemplating jumping out of the towers.

Human beings knowing their lives were over, but just trying to figure out how they wanted to die.

We’ll never forget you.

When i was in second grade 9/11 happened. I am American arab, my first language is Arabic.

On 9/11 I stayed home from school because I was very sick. I was with my family, we were all horrified by what was happening on the TV. We were praying for those people that were in danger. My mother who was Orthodox Christian at the time, lit a St. Mary candle and put it outside of our apartment building.

A couple hours later me and my little sister -who was in kindergarten- were going to see if the candle was still lit. As we walked up the steps from our front door to the main doors, we could hear shouting. Our neighbor was drunk, he was angry. A 45 year old man who lived with his girlfriend. We knew he drank, we always could hear him stomping, and shouting around above us. But on that day I could clearly hear what he was saying. “I’m going to kill them! I’m gonna shoot em!!” I heard these words but I didn’t know what he was talking about, we both brushed it off. Once we finally got outside, we saw that our candle was crushed. Someone had stomped on it, and broken it to pieces. Me and my sister ran back to our apartment to tell our mom, and once we got back in our home we were met by our dad, on the phone with the police department. Our neighbor was screaming from his balcony about how he was going to kill someone, and I finally had realized he was talking about us.

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