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In the Name of God

The Ramnamis are a small hindu sect from central India. As leather-workers they are on the lowest rung of the caste-system, because they process the skins of dead cows and are considered ‘untouchable’. Traditionally this status meant that they were prevented from entering Hindu temples along with the other castes. So, in an expression of their own proud religious convictions, the Ramnamis began the practice of tattooing the name of the god, (Ram) all over their faces and bodies. In this way they wished to show that everyone is equal in the eyes of God and that they have no need of temples to confess their faith. Today the Ramnami tradition continues with its own strand of Hindu belief and outdoor prayer areas, and its members hold their heads high in the knowledge of their devotion to their faith.

Olivia Arthur 2005

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Fantastic Kissing Vases by Ceramic by Johnson Tsang  

Hong Kong-based ceramic artist Johnson Tsang specializes in using a surrealist imagination to blend the worlds of humans and objects. His latest work is this fantastic series of kissing vases he’s entitled Out of the Rim.

After carefully forming each vase, Johnson made incisions with great precision and split the vases down to about 2″ above the base. He then gently pushed each slice outward, to create a stunning visual effect of a row of symmetrical faces. Finally, two of the vases are placed together to make it appear as if they were kissing.

Bindi can usually be described as a traditional red circular mark or dot worn by the Indian women on their forehead. When this is accompanied by a vermillion mark on the parting of hair just above the forehead, it indicates that the particular lady is married. The term ‘bindi’ is derived from the Sanskrit word ‘bindu’ meaning “a drop or a small dot or particle”. Even though traditionally, bindi is a red colored dot, it can be worn in other colors also, like yellow, orange and so on. The shape and size of the bindi can also vary.

Conventionally, it’s the Hindu married women who wear bindi. But, this mark can have several meanings and so, you may also see unmarried girls and even children wearing it. It’s the occasion, the color of the bindi and its shape that determines what it denotes. The customary bindi is made with red sindoor powder. The bindi is called the tilak when it’s applied on the forehead of a person, at the conclusion of a religious function or havan.

The purpose of wearing a bindi can also vary. If it covers the entire forehead in three horizontal lines, then it denotes the wearer is an ascetic or belongs to a particular sect (like Brahmin). Sometimes, the bindi is used for mere beautification purpose by females. In this case, you may also find her wearing a small jewelry instead of the typical red dot. Though in India, a widow cannot wear a vermillion, she is free to sport a bindi.

Bindi is called by different names in different languages of India. Thus, alternative names for bindi is Pottu in Tamil and Malayalam, Tilak in Hindi, Bottu or Tilakam in Telugu, Bottu or Tilaka in Kannada and Teep meaning “a pressing” in Bengali. Sometimes, the terms sindoor, kumkum, or kasturi are used depending upon the ingredients used in making the Bindi mark.

source

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Some claim the traditional Danish Æbleskiver actually come from Vikings cooking batter in old shield bosses!  Either way, I’m buying myself a pan and making them immediately…

More rocklovejewelry

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Bangles hold different meanings according to their color. Some regions have specific bangles associated with their local traditions, and there is a more general color code for bangles as well. Red bangles symbolize energy, blue bangles symbolize wisdom and purple symbolizes independence. Green stands for luck or marriage and yellow is for happiness. Orange bangles mean success, white ones mean new beginnings and black ones mean power. Silver bangles mean strength, while gold bangles mean fortune.

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Zedeka Poindexter - “Peach Cobbler” 

"The best story my family knows how to tell you will fill your belly with memories."

Performing during our open call video shoot in Omaha, NE.

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Captivating Black-And-White Street Photos Of Hong Kong From The 1950s

When photographer Fan Ho wandered the streets of Hong Kong’s old Central as a teenager armed with a Rolleiflex, he received varying reactions, ranging from intimidating stares by butchers, to enthusiastic smiles from girls who asked to be photographed twice. 

The award-winning photographer captured the quaint activities that took place in the old Central in the 1950s, with photos that showed the residents having a quick meal by the steps, and streets filled with coolies and rickshaw drivers. 

WISHING TREES: WHERE MONEY GROWS IN THE BRANCHES

BY ALLISON MEIER / 30 JUL 2014

In some places people toss coins into fountains begging for a wish, but in parts of the United Kingdom coins are pressed into trees for the same purpose. These “wishing trees” or “money trees” are a strange fusion of nature and manufactured metal, and represent a tradition dating back centuries.

Learn more and see some amazing photos at Atlas OBscura

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