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From the site: “Filmotype Jamboree was released by Filmotype in mid-1960s to expand its Scripts category with a smart looking fresh informal upright pen-script! Filmotype Jamboree was developed from the original font filmstrips and includes a full international character compliment, automatic fractionals, ordinals, and a very large set of alternate contextual and ending characters and ligatures to allow flawless typesetting in dynamic OpenType format [by Stuart Sandler].”

From the site: “World-renowned typographer, designer and letterpress practitioner Alan Kitching will teach a hands-on, two-day course exploring the details and fundamentals of typography. Taking place at his Kennington workshop August 24-25, the course will give each participant an exceptional understanding of typesetting and the art of letterpress printing.”

From the site: “Persian websites in Farsi often face the problem of using a cartoon-like font called Tahoma — [it] is technically an English font [that includes] an Arabic [character] set. The fact that the font is not Persian means that it is potentially difficult to read on some computers and […] can be culturally insensitive. Office of Digital and Design Innovation’s Manager of Design Steve Fuchs and Voice of America (VOA) Persian’s Bruce Bahmani explained the evolution of the project.”

From the site: “Filmotype Zephyr combines the elegant script capital forms with a classic condensed italic to create a smart and stylish typeface. Originally released in the early 1950s, Filmotype Zephyr has been meticulously redrawn from the original font filmstrips and has been enhanced to include a full international character compliment, automatic fractionals, ordinals, and a host of alternate characters in dynamic OpenType format by Alejandro Paul.”

From the site: “Filmotype Yukon is inspired by the classic Palmer style of penmanship made popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Originally released in the late 1950s, Filmotype Yukon has been meticulously redrawn from the original font filmstrips and has been enhanced to include a full international character compliment, automatic fractionals, ordinals, and a host of alternate characters in dynamic OpenType format [by Alejandro Paul.]”

From the site: “Sedán is a roman text font focused on the proportions and morphology of early Baroque type faces. The constructional principle of Sedán is still Renaissance, but its expression and details are drawn from the typography of the 17th and 18th centuries. In larger sizes, is elegant and eye-catching; in the smaller sizes, however, Sedán seems to be very legible despite its spicy characters.”

From the site: “Graublau Slab is the latest addition to the popular Graublau type family designed by the Berlin-based type designer Georg Seifert. With its contemporary and expressive design, it’s perfect for editorial design, web headlines or any other text use, that should really draw the reader’s attention. And since Graublau Slab comes in the exact same 7 weights as Graublau Sans Pro, both typefaces work together perfectly. With over 800 glyphs per style, it supports standard Latin (including Central European), Cyrillic and comes with the typical bells and whistles of a OpenType Pro font: ligatures, small caps, oldstyle figures and lining figures (both proportional and tabular), fraction figures, subscript and superscript figures and figures inside circles.”

From the site: “Stanzer is an interpretation of wood type combined with the idea of modern stencils. Instead of cutting every letter, we are presenting an example of how a modern stencil typeface could look like, as we have come to the conclusion that almost every letter works without cutting it. Stanzer is a Unicase typeface, available in three OpenType weights: Black, Shadow and Block. Stanzer first started as part of our diploma 2010 (it was called Stanley at that time). The basic idea behind this typeface is that it is fully stencil usable, and, unlike other stencil fonts, does not require any bridges (except for the O and Q). Almost every letter can be sprayed without inserting planks. However, Stanzer also offers the display weight Block, which is only suitable for print or online usage. Designed by Igor Labudovic and Michael Hager.”

From the site: “The only member of the original family was Aachen Bold, a typeface drawn for Letraset dry-transfer lettering sheets in 1969. A lighter companion was added in 1977. Although drawn for mid-20th century typesetting technologies, the two-weight Aachen family made an easy transition to digital fonts in the 1990s. ‘The first designs served as a template for the new family,’ recalls Wasco. ‘About a year before I started thinking about enlarging the original family, I had designed a slab serif typeface based on the Stymie design for a corporate client. As part of that project, I analyzed other slab serif favorites of mine, such as the ITC Lubalin Graph and Rockwell designs. This research had an important influence on Neue Aachen, as did the Bauer Bodoni and Melior typefaces.’ Not satisfied with just expanding the weight range of the original, Wasco decided to add complementary italic faces to his suite. He also drew an alternate two-story g for the roman weights The Neue Aachen family includes nine weights, from ultra light to black, each with an italic complement.”