the-chernobyl-disaster

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The Chernobyl disaster was a catastrophic nuclear accident that occurred on 26 April 1986 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine. An explosion and fire released large quantities of radioactive contamination into the atmosphere, which spread over much of Western USSR and Europe. It’s also widely considered to have been the worst nuclear power plant accident in history, and is one of only two classified as a level 7 event on the International Nuclear Event Scale. The battle to contain the contamination and avert a greater catastrophe ultimately involved over 500,000 workers and cost an estimated 18 billion rubles. The official Soviet casualty count of 31 deaths has been disputed, and long-term effects such as cancers and deformities are still being accounted for. [READ MORE]

April 26th, 1986

I am so scared. I cannot sleep, I cannot eat, I….I think I am in shock.  After the explosion….there was such mass hysteria. Brother only just left my bedside to get me a glass of water but I feel like I am going to throw up.

So many lives….I am so relieved it is not Ivan or Yekaterina in this position….but….I cannot stop shaking. Why can’t I stop? I need to show brother I am fine and that we are all fine I just…..I need to go. I think I am going to be sick after all.

OKAY ARE YOU ALL READY FOR AN EXHAUSTION FUELED RANT ABOUT FISH?

CATFISH ARE THE CUTEST FISH EVER

THERE ARE THREE MAIN KINDS (BLUE, FLATHEAD AND CHANNEL) AND THEY’RE ALL AMAZING

THEY HAVE ADORABLE LITTLE WHISKERS AND GREAT BIG MOUTHS

FLATHEAD AND BLUE CATFISH CAN GROW TO OVER 100 LBS. THAT’S A REALLY REALLY BIG FISH!!

THIS BIG BOYS CAN EAT PEOPLE.
PEOPLE. THAT’S A BIG ASS FISH

THERE ARE CATFISH LIVING IN THE DRAINING POND OF REACTOR FOUR. THAT’S THE ONE THAT BLEW UP IN THE CHERNOBYL DISASTER.

THESE THESE MARVELOUS BABES CAN LIVE IN RADIOACTIVE WATER ‘CAUSE THEY’RE BADASSES.

AND GUESS WHAT? THEY’RE STILL ADORABLE.

IN CONCLUSION: CATFISH ARE AMAZING AND SHOULD BE APPRECIATED.

anonymous asked:

Hiro, Tadashi and Baymax exploring the place after the Chernobyl disaster

Tadashi’s only there to test out Baymax. Can his nursebot sense radiation? Can Baymax detect how high the levels are? He intends to see if Baymax can be used for rescue efforts should something like a nuclear reactor meltdown happen again, because Baymax does not need to worry about radioactive poisoning like a human does.

Hiro is along just for the chance to explore, because he’s seen pictures and he knows it looks cool.

Neither of them was allowed to set foot in the exclusion zone without some forms of protection though, not if the Nerd Team could help it. Both of them get kitted up with personal dosimeters by Honey Lemon, and they’re both wearing watches to keep track of how long they’ve been in the site. They’re gonna get exposed to radiation, that can’t be helped, but at the very least their exposure is going to be limited. Honey Lemon is also on standby outside, keeping an eye on how long they’ve been gone. If she gets nervous, all she has to do is call and the boys’ll come right back.

SAFETY FIRST PEOPLE

The AFI DOCS Interview: THE RUSSIAN WOODPECKER’s Chad Gracia

In the AFI DOCS film THE RUSSIAN WOODPECKER, a young, eccentric Ukrainian artist named Fedor Alexandrovich — just four years old when the Chernobyl disaster struck — seeks to learn more about what happened at the nuclear plant. Fedor becomes fascinated with the Duga — a massive, Soviet-constructed radio antenna near the Chernobyl site that remains shrouded in mystery. Fedor discovers that the Duga was one of the USSR’s secret Cold War weapons built to penetrate Western communications systems and, possibly, minds.

AFI spoke to director Chad Gracia about his film. There are potential spoilers ahead, so proceed with caution. 

What was your inspiration behind making the film?

My protagonist, an artist in Kiev named Fedor, led me to THE RUSSIAN WOODPECKER — a radio signal from the Cold War. I was inspired both by the mystery surrounding this Cold War weapon, which stands just a few kilometers from the Chernobyl nuclear power station, as well as by Fedor’s intense fascination and dread regarding this object.

What particular obstacles did you face when making the film?

We faced many obstacles relating to the Soviet past’s lingering presence in Ukraine. For instance, several interviews with former military men had to be conducted with me (the only American on the team) hiding and Skyping messages to be asked of the interview subject. We found that when I was in the room, we were lied to or misled. More dangerously, our cinematographer was shot by a sniper while filming and while his camera saved his life (the bullet entered the lens), two of his friends were killed that day.

Continue reading 

THE RUSSIAN WOODPECKER will screen at AFI DOCS on June 19 and 20, 2015

Check out the trailer: 

On the second anniversary of the disaster, Legasov committed suicide by hanging himself from the stairwell of his apartment. Reportedly, before his suicide, he recorded himself on audiotape revealing previously undisclosed facts about the catastrophe. According to an analysis of the recording for the BBC TV Movie “Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster” (where he was played by actor Adrian Edmondson),[4] Legasov claims political pressure censored the mention of Soviet nuclear secrecy in his report to the IAEA, a secrecy which forbade even plant operators knowledge of previous accidents and known problems with reactor design. The programme implied that his suicide was at least partly due to his distress at not having spoken out about these factors at Vienna, the suppression of his subsequent attempts to do so and the damage to his career that these attempts caused. The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists also stated that Legasov had become bitterly disillusioned with the failure of the authorities to confront the design flaws.[5]

Legasov’s suicide caused shockwaves in the Soviet nuclear industry. In particular, the problem with the design of the control rods in Chernobyl-type RBMK reactors was rapidly admitted and changed.[4]

On September 20, 1996, then Russian president Boris Yeltsin posthumously conferred on Legasov the honorary title of Hero of the Russian Federation for the “courage and heroism” shown in his investigation of the disaster.

Some freaky stuff about me
  • I grew up in the Southwest, particularly Phoenix and El Paso. El Paso is close to the White Sands Missile Range, where the Trinity atomic bomb tests were conducted. My mother’s side of the family is also from northern New Mexico, sort of close to Los Alamos National Laboratories.
  • I got my undergrad degree from Trinity University
  • I am going to graduate school at the University of Chicago, where a lot of the research for the Manhattan Project was conducted.
  • The first Trinity Test was conducted the day after my birthday.
  • Nuclear stuff (Chernobyl disaster + Fallout series) and Cold War stuff is a low-key special interest of mine.

Urbex and 500px Prime photographer Iain Bolton offers us a haunting glimpse into the town of Pripyat, the nuclear city established in February of 1970 to support a nearby power plant you might have heard of… it was called Chernobyl.

Pripyat is, to put it lightly, a wasteland. Once a town of nearly 50,000 residents with schools, hospitals, pools, and performance halls, it was transformed into its current state almost overnight after the Chernobyl disaster on April 26th, 1986.

Zumbathon for Belarus Orphanage

Claire Drake got in touch with us to tell us about a Zumbathon held at Bailiffe Bridge Community Centre to raise money for the Burren Chernobyl Project.

Claire says: “I organised the event to raise money for an orphanage me and my boyfriend volunteer at each August. We go to Belarus to an orphanage for disabled children and young people affected by the Chernobyl disaster. We had 30 participants who Zumba-ed non-stop for 2 hours raising money through sponsorship. They were fab, we had a great time and enjoyed cake at the end! We had 4 local Zumba Instructors involved who gave up their time for free, Wendy Jones, Susan Shires, Abi Uttley and Annette Glover.”

You can find out more about Claire’s fundraising HERE

Do YOU have a story you want to share with us? Contact mybradford@bbc.co.uk

‘It’s been so grim, we may as well have been in Middlesbrough’

I have been to Middlesbrough.

I have been to Vienna. 

I love you Graham, but you’re wrong there. It would take a Chernobyl like disaster to level the playing field there.