For 12 hours, two herds of wild South African elephants slowly made their way through the Zululand bush until they reached the house of late author Lawrence Anthony.They some-how knew he had died on March 7th. He was a conservationist(Also the author of "The Elephant Whisperer: My Life with the Herd in the African Wild") who worked hard to save their lives. They marched for 12 hours and loitered(for 2 days) at Anthony’s rural compound on the vast Thula Thula game reserve in the South African KwaZulu just to say goodbye to their friend. 

Author and legendary conservationist Lawrence Anthony died March 7. His family tells of a solemn procession on March 10 that defies human explanation.

For 12 hours, two herds of wild South African elephants slowly made their way through the Zululand bush until they reached the house of late author Lawrence Anthony, the conservationist who saved their lives.The formerly violent, rogue elephants, destined to be shot a few years ago as pests, were rescued and rehabilitated by Anthony, who had grown up in the bush and was known as the “Elephant Whisperer.”

For two days the herds loitered at Anthony’s rural compound on the vast Thula Thula game reserve in the South African KwaZulu – to say good-bye to the man they loved. But how did they know he had died March 7? Known for his unique ability to calm traumatized elephants, Anthony had become a legend. He is the author of three books, Babylon Ark, detailing his efforts to rescue the animals at Baghdad Zoo during the Iraqi war, the forthcoming The Last Rhinos, and his bestselling The Elephant Whisperer.

There are two elephant herds at Thula Thula. According to his son Dylan, both arrived at the Anthony family compound shortly after Anthony’s death.“They had not visited the house for a year and a half and it must have taken them about 12 hours to make the journey,” Dylan is quoted in various local news accounts. “The first herd arrived on Sunday and the second herd, a day later. They all hung around for about two days before making their way back into the bush.”Elephants have long been known to mourn their dead. In India, baby elephants often are raised with a boy who will be their lifelong “mahout.” The pair develop legendary bonds – and it is not uncommon for one to waste away without a will to live after the death of the other. x

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“But perhaps the most important lesson I learned is that there are no walls between humans and the elephants except those that we put up ourselves, and that until we allow not only elephants, but all living creatures their place in the sun, we can never be whole ourselves.” 
― Lawrence AnthonyThe Elephant Whisperer

"An amazing occurrence happened in South Africa when 31 elephants made a “Journey To Pay their Respect.” How did they know? Something that is greater and deeper than human intelligence informed them that their hero – the man who had saved their lives and many other animals – had made his transition from this earthly world. Lawrence Anthony (1950 – 2012), a legend in South Africa and author of 3 books including the bestseller "The Elephant Whisperer", bravely rescued wildlife and rehabilitated elephants all over the globe from human atrocities, including the courageous rescue of Baghdad Zoo animals during the US invasion in 2003. On March 7, 2012 Lawrence Anthony died.

Two days after his passing, the wild elephants showed up at his home led by two large matriarchs. Separate wild herds arrived in droves to say goodbye to their beloved man-friend’. A total of 31 elephants had patiently walked over 12 miles to reach his South African House. Witnessing this spectacle, humans were obviously in awe not only because of the supreme intelligence and precise timing that these elephants sensed about Lawrence’s passing, but also because of the profound memory and emotion the beloved animals evoked in such an organized way.

Walking slowly – for days – they made their way in a solemn one-by-one queue from their habitat in the wild bush to his house. Lawrence’s wife, Francoise, was especially touched, knowing that the elephants had not been to his house prior to that day for well over 3 years! But yet they knew where they were going and they seemed to know why they were going to Lawrence’s home. The elephants obviously wanted to pay their deep respects, honoring their human friend who had saved their lives – so much respect that they stayed for 2 days 2 nights without eating anything.

After honoring Lawrence Anthony in the only way they could - in this touching and memorable tribute to the man who had saved them and many other animals around the world – these sentient creatures had proven they are wiser and more compassionate than the human race will ever be or ever realize. Then one morning, they left, making their long journey back home.”

-Jeff Mulan

Lawrence Anthony (conservationist and author of the elephant whisperer) passed away last weekend. An entire herd of elephants went to his house to mourn his passing. About 20 elephants from the Thula Thula Reserve gathered outside his home. What more proof do you need that animals feel complex emotions? “Anthony was convinced that they could communicate on another level. And now here they are, every night, coming to say goodbye.”

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Lawrence Anthony, a legend in South Africa and author of 3 books including the bestseller The Elephant Whispererbravely rescued wildlife and rehabilitated elephants all over the globe from human atrocities, including the courageous rescue of Baghdad Zoo animals during US invasion in 2003. On March 7,  2012 Lawrence Anthony died.  He is remembered and missed by his wife, 2 sons, 2 grandsons, and numerous elephants.  Two days after his passing, the wild elephants showed up at his home led by two large matriarchs. Separate wild herds arrived in droves to say goodbye to their beloved man-friend.  A total of 20 elephants had patiently walked over 12 miles to get to his South African house.

Witnessing this spectacle, humans were obviously in awe, not only because of the supreme intelligence and precise timing that these elephants sensed about Lawrence ‘s passing, but also because of the profound memory and emotion the beloved animals evoked in such an organized way:  Walking slowly for days, making their way in a solemn one-by-one queue from their habitat to his house.

Lawrence‘s wife, Francoise, was especially touched, knowing that the elephants had not been to his house prior to that day for well over a year! But yet they knew where they were going. The elephants obviously wanted to pay  their deep respects, honoring their friend who’d saved their lives - so much respect that they stayed for 2 days and 2 nights.  Then one morning, they left, making their long journey back home.

Whispers: An Elephant’s Tale Summary:

A nameless baby male elephant was just getting used to life in the herd, when poachers kill his mother, so he runs and gets lost. He’s found by a grouchy female, Groove, the sister of a matriarch, who walks off disgusted with life in her herd. Not exactly wholehearted, she still takes the orphan under her wing, ‘till we find your herd’, but fails to find his herd, or a new home with males -who find him disrespectful and mouthy- or her own herd, which nicknames the kid whispers since his trumpeting is so weak. meanwhile the fear for poachers and (that is, in the movie) lions drives them north over the great river, a long and dangerous journey…

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       The Elephant Whisperer; My Life with the Herd in the African Wild
                        by Lawrence Anthony and Graham Spence

Lawrence Anthony devoted his life to animal conservation, protecting the world’s endangered species. Then he was asked to accept a herd of “rogue” wild elephants on his Thula Thula game reserve in Zululand. His common sense told him to refuse, but he was the herd’s last chance of survival: they would be killed if he wouldn’t take them.

In order to save their lives, Anthony took them in. In the years that followed he became a part of their family. And as he battled to create a bond with the elephants, he came to realize that they had a great deal to teach him about life, loyalty, and freedom.

Amazon

I apologize for the very beat up cover of this book, it’s my own personal book and it’s well loved. It’s one of my favourite books ever and I definitely recommend a read.

The Elephant Whisperer

Often science is so overwhelming and so clean-cut that it’s hard to see anything but facts and figures. But there will always be things that we don’t understand and can’t explain, especially in the realms of animal science.

-For Lawrence Anthony.

For those who haven’t read my review of ‘Alex and Me’ by Irene Pepperberg, leave this page now and read that one first.

Are you done? Good.

Thula Thula is a game reserve in the heart of Zululand, South Africa. In 1999 for the first time in century, the area became home to a herd of elephants. These elephants are completely unlike those you see at the zoo. A life of human abuse has pushed this herd to the breaking point. They have all watched as their matriarch and her young calf was shot in from of them. They’ve been abused and they’ve been scared. They break through electric fences, charge any human they see and escape every enclosure. Thula Thula-and more importantly, its owner Lawrence Anthony is the very last chance for these elephants. The deal: either Anthony takes on the traumatised and unruly herd, or they will all be killed.

By slowly gaining the trust of these elephants-in a completely unconventional manner, Anthony is able to rescue the herd. The true nature of elephants, their intelligence and their relationships are more closely observed in this book than I have ever read before. ‘The Elephant Whisperer’ by Lawrence Anthony with Graham Spence extracts the key moments from Anthony’s life at Thula Thula over a decade or so. There are deaths, births and weddings. Thula Thula and its staff face fire, flood, mutiny, threats from the tribal community, tagati (evil spirits) and the most dangerous predator of all: man.

I really enjoyed reading about Africa and its people in this book. It was and insight into how the tribal community operates, and how important it is to the people. Anthony jokes that the people he hires from the community are pretty hopeless at using the walkie talkies in the park-but then there are aspects of their lives that we would not have even the smallest glimpse of understanding. I think this book would be a good one to read for anyone who is travelling to Africa, or anyone who loves learning about different cultures. It also speaks highly of the beauty of the land.

The defining difference between ‘The Elephant Whisperer’ and ‘Alex and Me’ is that the former is written by a conservationist, not a scientist. I tend to incline more towards the science side of things myself, so I was a little disappointed by the lack of actual facts and research which were so prominent in Alex and Me. Many of the observations made are of a somewhat spiritual nature-i.e., what Anthony feels is happening-as opposed to knowing what is happening. And that’s okay. Often, science is so overwhelming and so clean-cut that it’s hard to see past facts and figures. But there will always be things that we don’t understand and can’t explain, especially in the realms of animal science.

I believe Lawrence Anthony was similar to people like Jane Goodall, Irene Pepperberg and Dian Fossey, but with slightly less science orientation. They’re on the same page, but from a different book. I’ve recently found out that Lawrence Anthony passed away in 2012. Apparently after is death, the elephants from the reserve stood vigil outside his home on the reserve for two days. I am crying as I type this, because just as I’d found a hero, I discovered I’ll never get a chance to meet him.

One day, I will go to Thula Thula. And I will see these elephants. Or their great grandcalves in any case. And I will thank them for inspiring Lawrence Anthony to write The Elephant Whisperer.

If you’re looking for something different, are interested in conservation, culture or animals, this book is definitely one that you should pick up.

Love,

Sarah

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Shhh. There’s elephants. Shh!

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princess-nonsense asked:

Kindra is not interested in quadrants but they are a 6 foot flat orange blood. They stick out like a soar thumb. They wear really long puffy sweaters and have tusk like horns. They love video games and they are really clumsy and shy. There lusus is an elephant and because of this they've had to learn to talk at a whisper or Elephant mom hears everything. They have a really dumb yet cute olive blooded matesprit who one of your trolls is currently taking care of. Nice to meet you. ^^

looks like you dropped your anon mask there XDD  Nice to meet you too! 

First thing’s first, he would have to meet Corali.  She doesn’t even know Darius has a matesprit, plus he’s gotta be crazy worried about him (especially if they haven’t been in contact!)  She’ll probably poke fun at him a little, but she’d have no objections otherwise.  Anyone who makes her little brother happy *cough*and isn’t a highblood*cough* makes her happy.

Psi would probably really like him, but they can be overwhelming because of how hyper they are.  They’d probably try to teach him how to play D&D or something since they can’t play video games (As in they literally can’t because their psionics destroy almost all electronics)