the end of eating everything

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The End of eating Everything by Wangechi Mutu (ft. Santigold)

The Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University presents Kenyan artist Wangechi Mutu’s first animated video, created in collaboration with recording artist Santigold.

The 8-minute video, The End of eating Everything,marks the journey of a flying, planet-like creature navigating a bleak skyscape. This “sick planet” creature is lost in a polluted atmosphere, without grounding or roots, led by hunger towards its own destruction. The animation’s audio, also created by Mutu, fuses industrial and organic sounds.

View teaser trailer and interview with Mutu and Santigold.

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Jenna’s (Artist) Pick: Wangechi Mutu
Jenna headed to the Brooklyn Museum to check out Kenyan artist Wangechi Mutu’s exhibit. here’s closer look at what’s on display, but get there yourself before it closes on March 9…

Wangechi Mutu’s artwork from the mid-’90s to the present day has been brought together for this exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum. Among the highlights are her large-scale collages, never-before-seen sketchbook drawings and her first animation, The End of eating Everything (2013), a collaboration with the hip-hop artist Santigold, who appears in the film.

It should be noted that Wangechi Mutu is especially close to our hearts right now because she has teamed up with the CFDA and Vogue to design two prints in support of a new campaign called BORNFREE, which is geared toward eliminating the transmission of HIV from mother to baby by 2015. Twenty-three designers (and mothers), including Jenna, are designing a limited-edition collection of women’s and children’s clothing and accessories, which will be available in May. All proceeds will go directly to sub-Saharan countries that need the funds first. Watch this space for more details leading up to the launch.

Wangechi Mutu’s A Fantastic Journey exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum runs through March 9.
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"The End of Eating Everything" is artist Wangechi Mutu’s first animated video, created in collaboration with recording artist Santigold and co-released by the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University and MOCAtv on YouTube.

The 8-minute video stars Santigold as a mysterious protagonist who is part human, part cyborg, part flying island, and her own ecosystem. The creature encounters a flock of birds and gulps them voraciously, invoking ideas of consumption. The video features an original soundscape by Mutu, a haunting score of weather, animal and machine sounds.

"The End of Eating Everything" was commissioned by the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University as part of the new exhibition "Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey," the first survey in the United States for this internationally renowned, multidisciplinary artist, and her most comprehensive and innovative show yet. "The End of Eating Everything" can be viewed in person at the Nasher Museum through July 21, 2013. This video is also shared at nasher.duke.edu/mutu.

Cast: Santigold
Art Director: Wangechi Mutu
Animation: Awesome + Modest
Animation Assistants: Greg Lytle, Jasmina Mathieu
Visual Effects Artist: Joaquin Jutt
Tracking Artist: Dylan Jutt
Camera and Lighting: Paul Shin
Make Up Artist: Devra Kinery
Sound Design: Cyrus Shahmir
Project Manager: Virginia Wagner
Studio Manager: Alexandra Giniger

Special Thanks:

Santi’s Fabulous Energy and Talent
Trevor Schoonmaker and the Nasher Museum Team
Jeffery Deitch
The Super Mutu Studio
Dedicated to Wathira, Neema and Mario
Commissioned by the Nasher Museum of Art At Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.
Animation © 2013 Wangechi Mutu Studio.

This short clip leaves a lot to the imagination so if anyone does happen to see this, please drop me a line.

Man, the animation on Santi’s body made my skin crawl.

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The End of eating Everything is an excerpt of artist Wangechi Mutu’s first animated video, created in collaboration with recording artist Santigold and co-released by the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University and MOCAtv.

The video marks the journey of a flying, planet-like creature navigating a bleak skyscape. This “sick planet” creature is lost in a polluted atmosphere, without grounding or roots, led by hunger towards its own destruction. The animation’s audio, also created by Mutu, fuses industrial and organic sounds.

The End of eating Everything is an official selection of the 2014 Sundance Film Festival and will be screening in Park City all week. Full schedule on the Sundance website.

Wangechi Mutu x Santigold | ‘The End of Eating Everything’

Back in February, Kenyan-American artist Wangechi Mutu told Okayafrica that she was making a video with musician Santigold. That video has materialized and is currently exhibiting at Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. Talking about the piece entitled ‘The End of Eating Everything’ Mutu says: “talking about consumption is also talking about a state of mind, and really how much do we need?” The question is a resonant one, especially in our moment of environmental and global financial crisis. Watch a video preview of the animated short film on Okayplayer.

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Art enslaves me- Wangechi Mutu + Santigold-The end of eating everything.

"Santigold stars in Artist Wangechi Mutu’s First Animated Video."

Something is Wrong

Here on AO3

Rated: T ; approx. 2k

(Basically is just sick Coliver. Hope you enjoy!)

Something is wrong with Oliver.

When Oliver doesn’t respond to any of the texts Connor sends him during class, Connor brushes it off with a confident shrug. Even though Oliver always texts him back. Even if it’s just a quick “Can’t text now.” He’s probably in the middle of a meeting or on a call or something.

When Oliver doesn’t respond to any of the emails Connor sends him while walking across campus to grab a sandwich, Connor figures it isn’t anything to worry about. Even though Oliver always emails him back. Even if it’s as simple as “We’ll talk tonight.” He gets a ton of email everyday so what if one message (or six) got lost in the shuffle.

When Oliver doesn’t respond to the Facebook messages Connor sends him in the middle of his second class of the day, Connor rationalizes it’s no big deal. Even though Oliver always messages him back. Even it’s as meaningless as “Why do you send me messages here? You know I hate Facebook.” He’s just being a good employee. Not checking in while still at work. Being responsible.

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I can not with the Brilliance of this piece. Just watch and LIVE… live for the magic. 

Wangechi Mutu + Santigold - The End of eating Everything - Nasher Museum at Duke 

"The End of Eating Everything" is artist Wangechi Mutu’s first animated video, created in collaboration with recording artist Santigold and co-released by the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University and MOCAtv on YouTube.

youtube

Wangechi Mutu + Santigold - The End of eating Everything

I saw this exhibit this Spring at the Brooklyn museum and it really knocked my socks off!

feuilly who spends several months in advance collecting toy donations and buying things  when possible for children who otherwise would not have anything to wake up to on christmas morning

feuilly who wraps each gift with the help of the amis in bright colored paper and glittering bows with no negligence on the amount that they stand out or scream the holiday season (because if they are going to do this they are going to make sure it’s as perfect as they can give)

feuilly who puts on a santa suit and goes from orphanage to orphanage giving out gifts to those who have barely anything but the clothes on their backs and taking the time to talk to each one of them as they shriek over the new gifts he gives to them

feuilly who is able to go home by the end of the day with a smile on his face even after so much work and effort because each one of those children was able to have a christmas that they deserved (ノ◕ヮ◕)ノ*:・゚✧

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The End of eating Everything by Wangechi Mutu and Santigold

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October 11, 2013–March 9, 2014

Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, 4th Floor

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey is the first survey in the United States of this internationally renowned, Brooklyn-based artist. Spanning from the mid-1990s to the present, the exhibition unites more than fifty pieces, including Mutu’s signature large-scale collages as well as video works, never-before-seen sketchbook drawings, a site-specific wall drawing, and sculptural installations. Born in Nairobi, Kenya, Mutu scrutinizes globalization by combining found materials, magazine cutouts, sculpture, and painted imagery. Sampling such diverse sources as African traditions, international politics, the fashion industry, pornography, and science fiction, her work explores gender, race, war, colonialism, global consumption, and the exoticization of the black female body. Mutu is best known for spectacular and provocative collages depicting female figures—part human, animal, plant, and machine—in fantastical landscapes that are simultaneously unnerving and alluring, defying easy categorization and identification. Bringing her interconnected ecosystems to life for this exhibition through sculptural installations and videos, Mutu encourages audiences to consider these mythical worlds as places for cultural, psychological, and socio-political exploration and transformation. 

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey is organized by the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University by Trevor Schoonmaker, Chief Curator and Patsy R. and Raymond D. Nasher Curator of Contemporary Art. The Brooklyn Museum presentation is coordinated by Saisha Grayson, Assistant Curator, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, Brooklyn Museum.

This exhibition was made possible by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Major support was provided by Marilyn M. Arthur, the Ford Foundation, the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, Katherine Thorpe, Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects, Gladstone Gallery, New York; Victoria Miro Gallery, London; and the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources.

The exhibition in Brooklyn has been made possible by the Elizabeth A. Sackler Foundation.

Additional generous support has been provided by Gladstone Gallery, Victoria Miro Gallery, London, Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects, and the Helene Zucker Seeman Memorial Exhibition Fund.

(via www.brooklynmuseum.org)

every time I read this part I have to laugh because I picture fingon rising from the dead or the bottom layer of the haudh-en-ndengin and indignantly going EXCUSE U

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a perfect metaphor of our times, as the camera slowly zooms out, Santigold is revealed as only a tiny protrusion on a massive, floating organism. flailing hands cover the perimeter of a large part of this being, as do factory-like smoke stacks which emit puffs of dark gas whenever Santi consumes the birds - we get the impression that Santi’s huge body is a processing plant of sorts. and actually, this organism appears to move forward only through the thrust generated by another gas expulsion towards its back end. basically, the more Santi eats, the more is processed, and the more she defecates, propelling her body forward. if she does not eat, she cannot move forward, if she does not move forward, she will not eat - it’s the kind of cyclical, shark-like metaphor that often gets attributed to this current late stage of global Capitalism, where perpetual motion and consumption are equated with growth and stability, offering little in the way of imagining a different reality. 

Mutu’s collaborative animation, however, does invite us to consider the future, what happens “at the end”, and beyond. She challenges us to identify the ways in which we have become complicit, and comfortable in the current situation, accepting our reality as the only possible reality, rather than taking the time to reflect, reinvent, and re-imagine a way out of our self-destructive narratives. 

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Santigold protagonista del corto di animazione “The End of Eating Everything”, firmato dall’artista contemporanea Wangechi Mutu.

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"The End of eating Everything" is an excerpt of artist Wangechi Mutu’s first animated video, created in collaboration with recording artist Santigold and co-released by the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University and MOCAtv on YouTube. 

The 8-minute video, “The End of eating Everything,” marks the journey of a flying, planet-like creature navigating a bleak skyscape. This “sick planet” creature is lost in a polluted atmosphere, without grounding or roots, led by hunger towards its own destruction. The animation’s audio, also created by Mutu, fuses industrial and organic sounds.

"The End of eating Everything" was commissioned by the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University as part of the new exhibition "Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey," the first survey in the United States for this internationally renowned, multidisciplinary artist, and her most comprehensive and innovative show yet. "The End of eating Everything" can be viewed in person at the Nasher Museum through July 21, 2013, and at the Brooklyn Museum from October 11, 2013-March 9, 2014. A version of this video is also shared at http://nasher.duke.edu/mutu/art.php andhttp://www.brooklynmuseum.org/exhibit…

Cast: Santigold
Art Director: Wangechi Mutu
Animation: Awesome + Modest
Animation Assistants: Greg Lytle, Jasmina Mathieu
Visual Effects Artist: Joaquin Jutt
Tracking Artist: Dylan Jutt
Camera and Lighting: Paul Shin
Make Up Artist: Devra Kinery 
Sound Design: Cyrus Shahmir 
Project Manager: Virginia Wagner 
Studio Manager: Alexandra Giniger 

Special Thanks:

Santi’s Fabulous Energy and Talent
Trevor Schoonmaker and the Nasher Museum Team
Jeffery Deitch
The Super Mutu Studio
Dedicated to Wathira, Neema and Mario
Commissioned by the Nasher Museum of Art At Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. 
Animation © 2013 Wangechi Mutu Studio.

 

I am so looking forward to checking out Wangechi Mutu’s exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum next month (thanks to my friend Safia for the reminder!)

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this is a spoiler for it but Fantastic Journey is at the Block until 7th December and is very, very good (+ free!!). Seeing her collage up close and personal is really a Feeling.