swazis

Swazi Gold

Swaziland is a landlocked country sandwiched between South Africa and Mozambique. Despite Swaziland’s small size, it boasts more hectares of land dedicated to growing Cannabis than all of India. It is also home to Swazi Gold, the legendary sativa strain.

Hamilton Morris travels to Swaziland hoping to chemically analyze the cannabinoids present in some of the local strains. Instead, he finds a country steeped in political corruption and economic turmoil. Cannabis is viewed by many growers, users, and politicians as a drug that will cause insanity, but it may be Swaziland’s only hope for economic stability.

Watch Part 1

Swazi Gold, Part 2

Swaziland is a landlocked country sandwiched between South Africa and Mozambique. Despite Swaziland’s small size, it boasts more hectares of land dedicated to growing Cannabis than all of India. It is also home to Swazi Gold, the legendary sativa strain.

Hamilton Morris travels to Swaziland hoping to chemically analyze the cannabinoids present in some of the local strains. Instead, he finds a country steeped in political corruption and economic turmoil. Cannabis is viewed by many growers, users, and politicians as a drug that will cause insanity, but it may be Swaziland’s only hope for economic stability.

Watch

#tbt to more Swaziland fun. @jwebxl sending a tall enough v9 boulder. @sandstones_media With the tall enough spot. Most rigs in Swazi checked in at about v4, v9, or v13+. Check my blog via @topodesigns for more about the trip!

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Ndebele Languages 

Southern Ndebele

The Southern Ndebele language (isiNdebele or Nrebele in Southern Ndebele) is an African language belonging to the Nguni group of Bantu languages (Niger-Congo), and spoken by the amaNdebele (the Ndebele people of South Africa).

The history of the amaNdebele can be traced to Musi, the last monarch of the tribe as a single nation. Researchers still disagree on specific times of the tribe’s separation from their main Nguni Group. (which include the Xhosa, Zulu and the Swazi).It is estimated that the migration took place as early as 1200 A.D. AmaNdebele are known to be the first Nguni group to enter the hinterland of the southern tip of the African continent, later to be called Transvaal (today’s Gauteng Province). AmaNdebele lived as one nation at Emhlangeni (today’s Randfontein area) under King Mhlanga approximately between 1550-1580.

The name of EMhlangeni is today being translated to the Sotho language, Mohlakeng. Most archeologists and historians agree that the amaNdebele settled for a longer period peacefully at Kwamnyamana and Emarula (Wonderboompoort). These areas are in the north and northwest of present day Pretoria. The nation arrived in this area with Musi, the son of Mhlanga who is in turn the son of Mafana. The nation can still be found in that area to day.

Ndebele is one of the eleven official languages in the Republic of South Africa. The language has been severely marginalized over the years. Until the formation of the apartheid Ndebele homeland (KwaNdebele), speaking the language publicly was discouraged. Most Ndebele speakers preferred Zulu especially because the latter was learned at school. Today the Ndebele speakers, mostly those who are educated still prefer to use Ndebele as home language for their children and will use Ndebele as a language to communicate with other Ndebele speakers.

Northern Ndebele

The Northern Ndebele language, isiNdebele, Sindebele, or just Ndebele belongs to the Nguni group of Bantu languages (Niger-Congo family), and spoken by the Ndebele or Matabele people of Zimbabwe and also Botswana

isiNdebele is related to the Zulu language spoken in South Africa. This is because the Ndebele people of Zimbabwe descend from followers of the Zulu leader Mzilikazi, who left KwaZulu in the early nineteenth century during the Mfecane.

The Northern and Southern Ndebele languages are not variants of the same language; though they both fall in the Nguni group of Bantu languages, Northern Ndebele is essentially a dialect of Zulu, and the older Southern Ndebele language falls within a different subgroup. The shared name is due to contact between Mzilikazi’s people and the original Ndebele, through whose territory they crossed during the Mfecane

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