Watch on futurescope.co

Future Noir: HP Corporate Video Surveillance Analytics Advertorial

State of 2014. Big corporate/stack AI-brothers are watching every urban step, because it’s “easy, convenient and useful”… Welcome to the New Normal.

Without question, advanced surveillance capabilities have become increasingly important in corporate, national, and global organizations. One of the biggest challenges faced by today’s security teams is how to understand, analyze, and interpret the significance of information gathered in day-to-day operations. Organizations must deal with growing volumes and types of data—and this challenge demands a comprehensive strategy that encompasses all surveillance data and the ability to integrate it with operational data. HP Surveillance takes an automated and intelligent approach to monitoring all electronic communications across your organization.

Cyborg Unplug

Plug in anti surveillance device that detects and stops potential data infringement in your workplace:

Cyborg Unplug is a wireless anti-surveillance system for the home and workplace. ‘Plug to Unplug’, it detects and kicks devices known to pose a risk to personal privacy from your local wireless network, breaking uploads and streams. Detected devices currently include: Google Glass, Dropcam, small drones/copters, wireless ‘spy’ microphones and various other network-dependent surveillance devices.

Cyborg Unplug comes hot on the heels of glasshole.sh, a script written by Julian Oliver to detect and disconnect Google’s Glass device from a locally owned and administered network. Following broad coverage in the press, the script struck a chord with countless people all over the world that felt either frustrated or threatened by the growing use and abuse of covert, camera-enabled computer technology.

Available to pre-order on 30th September

More Here

The US government can brand you a terrorist based on a Facebook post. We can’t let them make up the rules

Innocent people’s lives are being ruined. Why isn’t anyone watching the watchlist?

Aug. 30 2014

The US government’s web of surveillance is vast and interconnected. Now we know just how opaque, inefficient and discriminatory it can be.

As we were reminded again just this week, you can be pulled into the National Security Agency’s database quietly and quickly, and the consequences can be long and enduring. Through ICREACH, a Google-style search engine created for the intelligence community, the NSA provides data on private communications to 23 government agencies. More than 1,000 analysts had access to that information.

This kind of data sharing, however, isn’t limited to the latest from Edward Snowden’s NSA files. It was confirmed earlier this month that the FBI shares its master watchlist, the Terrorist Screening Database, with at least 22 foreign governments, countless federal agencies, state and local law enforcement, plus private contractors.

The watchlist tracks “known” and “suspected” terrorists and includes both foreigners and Americans. It’s also based on loose standards and secret evidence, which ensnares innocent people. Indeed, the standards are so low that the US government’s guidelines specifically allow for a single, uncorroborated source of information – including a Facebook or Twitter post – to serve as the basis for placing you on its master watchlist.

Of the 680,000 individuals on that FBI master list, roughly 40% have “no recognized terrorist group affiliation”, according to the Intercept. These individuals don’t even have a connection – as the government loosely defines it – to a designated terrorist group, but they are still branded as suspected terrorists.

The absurdities don’t end there. Take Dearborn, Michigan, a city with a population under 100,000 that is known for its large Arab American community – and has more watchlisted residents than any other city in America except New York.

These eye-popping numbers are largely the result of the US government’s use of a loose standard – so-called “reasonable suspicion” – in determining who, exactly, can be watchlisted.

Read More

Secret Surveillance Battle Between Yahoo and the U.S. Government Revealed

Sep. 11 2014

Update: The office of the Director of National Intelligence has released many of the declassified documents from the Yahoo litigation

More than 1,000 pages documenting a secret court battle between Yahoo and the government over warrantless surveillance will soon be released, the company said Thursday afternoon.

In 2007, Yahoo fought back against the government’s demand for information on certain overseas customers, saying that the request was over-broad and violated the constitution.

Yahoo’s challenge ultimately failed, knocked down by both the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC, which oversees secret government spying) and its review court. The company then became one of the first to hand over information to the NSA’s PRISM program, which allowed the government access to records of internet users’ chats, emails, and search histories, according to documents leaked by Edward Snowden. The targeted user was supposed to be foreign, but U.S. communications could still be swept up in the effort. Google, YouTube, AOL, and Skype were also among the companies that provided communications data to PRISM. According to the Washington Post, the government used the FISC court’s decision in the Yahoo case to pressure those others to comply.

In a statement on the company tumblr, Yahoo’s general counsel wrote that the government at one point threatened to fine Yahoo $250,000 per day if it did not release the data. That revelation is among the 1,500 pages of documents that the company plans to post shortly, he said. Also included is the original FISC opinion from 2008 forcing Yahoo to acquiesce to the government’s  demands.

The legal fight has mostly been hidden from view, with the heavily redacted exception of the review court’s order upholding the FISC decision. Yahoo’s name was even blacked out in that order, and not revealed until 2013. Yahoo asked for declassification of the court materials, and in August, the government finished its redactions. The FISC review court ordered the declassified material be released today—but it’s still mostly documents from the review, not the original challenge. Yahoo said it is still pushing for the rest of the case to be made public.

Enterovirus D68

EV-D68 Infections Reported

Hospitals in Missouri and Illinois are seeing more children than usual with severe respiratory illness caused by enterovirus D68 for this time of the year.

Several other states are investigating clusters of children with severe respiratory illness, possibly due to enterovirus D68.

CDC is watching this situation closely and helping the states with testing of specimens.

Q: What is enterovirus D68?

A: Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is one of many non-polio enteroviruses. This virus was first identified in California in 1962, but it has not been commonly reported in the United States.

Q: What are the symptoms of EV-D68 infection?

A: EV-D68 can cause mild to severe respiratory illness.

  • Mild symptoms may include fever, runny nose, sneezing, cough, and body and muscle aches.
  • Most of the children who got very ill with EV-D68 infection in Missouri and Illinois had difficulty breathing, and some had wheezing. Many of these children had asthma or a history of wheezing.
Q: How does the virus spread?

A: Since EV-D68 causes respiratory illness, the virus can be found in an infected person’s respiratory secretions, such as saliva, nasal mucus, or sputum. EV-D68 likely spreads from person to person when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or touches contaminated surfaces.

States with Lab-confirmed EV‑D68 Infections

From mid-August to September 19, 2014, a total of 160 people in 22 states have been confirmed to have respiratory illness caused by EV-D68. Learn more about states with confirmed cases.

Q: How many people have been confirmed to have EV-68 infection?

A: From mid-August to September 19, 2014, a total of 160 people in 22 states were confirmed to have respiratory illness caused by EV-D68. (See States with Lab-confirmed Enterovirus D68.) The cases of EV-D68 infection were confirmed by the CDC or state public health laboratories that notified CDC.

Q: How common are EV-D68 infections in the United States?

A: EV-D68 infections are thought to occur less commonly than infections with other enteroviruses. However, CDC does not know how many infections and deaths from EV-D68 occur each year in the United States. Healthcare professionals are not required to report this information to health departments. Also, CDC does not have a surveillance system that specifically collects information on EV-D68 infections. Any data that CDC receives about EV-D68 infections or outbreaks are voluntarily provided by labs to CDC’s National Enterovirus Surveillance System (NESS). This system collects limited data, focusing on circulating types of enteroviruses and parechoviruses.

Q: What time of the year are people most likely to get infected?

A: In general, the spread of enteroviruses is often quite unpredictable, and different types of enteroviruses can be common in different years with no particular pattern. In the United States, people are more likely to get infected with enteroviruses in the summer and fall.

We’re currently in middle of the enterovirus season, and EV-D68 infections are likely to decline later in the fall.

Q: Who is at risk?

A: In general, infants, children, and teenagers are most likely to get infected with enteroviruses and become ill. That’s because they do not yet have immunity (protection) from previous exposures to these viruses. We believe this is also true for EV-D68.

Among the EV-D68 cases in Missouri and Illinois, children with asthma seemed to have a higher risk for severe respiratory illness.

(From CDC)

I’m pretty jaded about surveillance stuff at this point—I just figure the government is probably already doing the worst thing it can get away with—but this is super creepy:

The U.S. Navy recently completed a test flight of a surveillance drone whose route began in California, crossed the Southwest and the Gulf of Mexico, and ultimately landed in Maryland. The drone, which has a wingspan of 130 feet, is the first cross-country flight in preparation for near worldwide coverage through a network of airborne orbits operating 24 hours a day, seven days a week” by 2017.

The drones will use ”radar, infrared sensors, and advanced cameras to provide full-motion video and photographs to the military” during their constant patrol. They are manufactured by Northrop Grumman, which spent more money lobbying the government than any other single corporation in 2013.  --Bonnie Kristian

Text
Photo
Quote
Link
Chat
Audio
Video