superphones

Idea for Microsoft: whenever you decide on something brand-related, you should pause — then pick something that’s the exact opposite of your initial thought. 

Also, the bigger problem remains. If the “Superphones” are coming in Q4 2012, they’re going to run headfirst into dozen of Android “Superphones” and likely one big “iSuperPhone” — which is I’m sure what Apple will call it. It just has such a nice ring to it.

Update: As Hunter Walk reminds me, there’s actually a name for my new strategy for Microsoft: The “Costanza”

Got the Samsung Galaxy S2 X!!

I couldn’t stand Blackberry any.. i just couldn’t do it! I wasn’t even on planning on getting it.. I just walked by the place and.. bam next thing I know i was inquiring about the stuff and what not.. and it was just. BUT I GOT THE PHONE! Only cost me bout $450 though o.O To get out of my previous 3 year and just renew again D: But it’s so worth it, and if I end up getting the Asus Transformer Tablet comming out, i’ll get the 6GB data plan.. and i’ll be set :D

Living with dual-core phones with 16 megapixel cameras and quad-core tablets that offer an almost console like gaming experience, we sometimes forget where mobile technology was 3-5 years ago. In times of styluses, resistive touch screens, and pixels you could actually see on your phone’s display, we were fascinated by mobile Internet and integrated WiFi technology. Sometimes, I like to bring up these old days again and just think of things that fascinated me back then.

Well these phones bring back some memories.

"Everyone doing ok?"

Our waitress asked this morning. The writer in me immediately thinks of that grammar tool about the difference between doing ‘good’ and ‘well’:

Superman does good. You are doing well.

But what if Superman is only doing ok?

Instead of flying up to save a cat from a tree, he just points it out nearby strangers and flies off.

Instead of stopping a runaway locomotive, Superman uses his superphone to call and warn the local authorities, then goes back to playing Angry Birds.

In Depth: iPhone through the ages: just how much has it changed?

The birth of Apple’s superphone

It was January 2007 when Steve Jobs took to the stage of the Moscone Center San Francisco to announce the arrival of the iPhone, which went on sale worldwide later that year.

If you find it difficult to remember that far back, Leona Lewis was number one in the UK with A Moment Like This and people were flocking to the cinema to get teary-eyed at Will Smith in The Pursuit Of Happyness.

While our pop music and movie choices may not have improved much, smartphones were changed forever: from that point on, touchscreens, apps and digital media were the way forward.

iPhone 1 (first generation)

Launched: June 2007 (US), November 2007 (UK)

Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone as three devices in one: a touchscreen iPod, a revolutionary mobile phone, and a truly mobile web browser.

Now we take touchscreens, digital media playback and Web access for granted, but in 2007 the iPhone was unlike anything that had appeared before. Its 3.5-inch screen had a 320 x 480 pixel reoslution (one of the best displays of the time), with a 2MP camera built-in, and up to 8GB of storage.

Third-party apps were not yet allowed on “iPhone OS”. In the TechRadar review, we noted that despite several shortcomings, the phone had “changed the mobile device landscape… multitouch will prove to be a model for interfaces in the future.”

iPhone 3G (second generation)

Launched: July 2008

High-speed connectivity was big news in 2008, which is why the second generation iPhone included 3G in its moniker (rather confusingly, as this was the second generation iPhone). It also brought with it a thinner shape, a plastic back and - crucially - support for the newly launched App Store.

The app store model worked so well you’ll now find it replicated in everything from your smart TV to yourWindows 8 laptop, and the change helped Apple’s phone really start to gain traction.

We said in our iPhone 3G review promised that buyers would be “amazed by the function and feel of this handset.” The iPhone era had begun in earnest.

iPhone 3GS (third generation)

Launched: June 2009

The iPhone 3GS upgrade was viewed as disappointingly minor at the time, but look at the detail and a different picture emerges: as well as faster performance, the new handset offered a better 3.2MP camera (that could now record video as well as take photos), extra storage options and voice control (the precursor to Siri).

The display was the same 3.5-inch 320 x 480 screen, and the device’s appearance remained largely unchanged from the 3G model. TechRadar’s take on the unit praised the multimedia and internet capabilities while still finding niggles with the camera, call quality and battery life – this was the first of the more iterative updates to the iPhone but did enough to keep users happy.

iPhone 4 (fourth generation)

Launched: June 2010

If the 3GS was a minor upgrade, the iPhone 4 was a serious step up - a new, flat design with an integrated antenna (although questions were raised about how you held the device) a high-resolution Retina display (640 x 960 pixels) that showed the rest of the world how it was done and a superior 5MP camera (featuring HD video recording) on top of internal performance improvements.

The competition was catching up, and Apple had responded in brilliant fashion. We were certainly impressed, despite some reservations about the high price, saying “it’s intriguing to see record-breaking numbers queuing up to pick up this device - but after playing with it for a few days, you can see why.”

iPhone 4S to now

iPhone 4S (fifth generation)

Launched: October 2011

Apple pulled out the “S” tag again for the fifth generation handset, indicating a minor upgrade rather than a major overhaul.

The design of the iPhone 4S was the same, but inside was Apple’s new A5 processor, vastly improved graphics capabilities and an 8MP camera with 1080p video recording. iOS was evolving at the same rate as the hardware, of course, and Siri began life as an iPhone 4S exclusive.

The improvements were enough to persuade us to describe it as “the best thing Apple has ever created” in the official TechRadar review.

iPhone 5 (sixth generation)

Launched: September 2012

Six handsets later, Apple finally decided it was time to tweak the iPhone’s screen size and aspect ratio.

Coming in at 20% lighter than its predecessor, the 2012 iPhone adopted a 4-inch screen running at 640 x 1136 pixels.

Otherwise, despite the usual speed bump and a stronger antenna, it was very much business as usual in terms of the design and capabilities.

Our biggest gripe in our iPhone 5 review was with the aging iOS, but with iOS 7 arriving on September 18 that issue is very much negated, which will please a number of iPhone 5 users who’ve been holding onto the handset for nearly a year.

iPhone 5S/5C (seventh generation)

Launched: September 2013

The big step in the seventh stage of the iPhone’s evolution was the arrival of the iPhone 5C, a slightly cheaper, plastic-backed model to help battle Android in the busy mobile middle market. The signs were there already — remember Apple kept the iPhone 4 and 4S on sale during the iPhone 5 era.

Apart from the plastic shell and larger battery though the iPhone 5C was a carbon copy of the iPhone 5 in terms of specs - which was retired to make way for the two new handsets.

As for the flagship iPhone 5S, it was a case of under-the-hood improvements again: more power, a better camera, and a fancy fingerprint reader hidden under the home button. The bigger changes arrived with iOS 7, the most radical revamp of the mobile operating system since the App Store arrived back in 2008.

iPhone 6/6 Plus (eighth generation)

Launched: September 2014

After the smaller changes that came with the iPhone 5C and iPhone 5S, Apple was back to its revolutionary best with the following generation as the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus brought the biggest alterations in design and features since the leap from the iPhone 4S to the iPhone 5.

The most striking change the eighth generation iPhones ushered in was undoubtedly the screen size, with the iPhone 6’s display leaping from the iPhone 5’s 4-inches to 4.7-inches. Apple also upped the resolution from the 1136 x 640 of previous iPhones to 1334 x 750. This meant that the larger screen still had a high pixel density of 326ppi (pixels per inch), so image quality remains incredibly sharp and detailed.

As the name suggests the iPhone 6 Plus went even larger with a whopping 5.5-inch display, marking Apple’s first foray into the phablet market. The iPhone 6 Plus also got a resolution boost to full high definition, 1920 x 1080. With a pixel density of 401ppi not only does the iPhone 6 Plus have the largest screen of any iPhone ever, but it also has the clearest as well.

The iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus also benefit from Apple’s use of “dual-domain pixels”, which along with the 1300:1 contrast ratio makes the screen on the handsets look absolutely fantastic.

Both the iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6 Plus also ditched the industrial and sharp-edged design that had been with the iPhone for four generations in favour of a more ergonomically-pleasing chassis with a screen that curves into a body with rounded edges and corners.

Both handsets feature metal backs, and as we pointed out in our reviews they take a lot of design language from the iPad Air, resulting in a product that looks and feels genuinely premium.

Another big change is that the boosted screen sizes and the corresponding increase in body dimensions has meant that the power button now resides on the right-hand side of the devices.

Along with the launch of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus Apple released iOS 8, which kept much of the flat aesthetics of iOS 7 and ushered in some neat new features.

It wasn’t a completely smooth launch, however, and after only a few months Apple has already patched it to iOS 8.1.3 in a bid to squash bugs and fix problems.

The rocky launch of iOS 8 was in stark contrast to the assured releases of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, with Apple proudly announcing that the two iPhones broke the company’s records for pre-orders in the first night they were available.

iPhone 6S/7

Launching: September 2015

This brings us bang up to date, so what does Apple have in store for its next iPhone? We’re still not sure if we’ll see an iPhone 6S or an entirely new iPhone 7.

However we have been hearing plenty of rumours and speculation about the next generation iPhone already, for example it will have “the biggest camera jump ever”, featuring a two-lens system which could apparently rival DSLRs in quality.

Sony has recently announced a 21MP stacked CMOS sensor which can focus on fast moving objects and includes HDR for 4K video and high-resolution photos. What’s interesting is that Sony currently supplies Apple with camera modules, so we might see some of that tech in the next iPhone.

It will almost certainly come with a new processor, most likely called the A9, and the rumours we’ve heard suggest that Samsung will build the chip that will be 15% smaller, 20% more powerful and 35% more power efficient than the Apple A8 processor found in the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus.

Could the iPhone 6S or iPhone 7 follow in the footsteps of the Galaxy Note Edge? We don’t think it’s particularly likely, but there have been rumours that Apple might try something drastic with the screen.

Rumours once again hint at the upcoming iPhone having a rugged sapphire display, while others hint at Apple going for a smaller 4-inch design in a bid to appease people who weren’t too keen on the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus’ increased dimensions.

It looks like Apple could also be preparing to launch iOS 9 alongside the iPhone 6S/iPhone 7, with reports claiming a beta program to test iOS 9 will run over the summer – perhaps to make sure there are no repeats of iOS 8’s troubled launch.

Make sure you keep an eye on our iPhone 7 release date, news and rumors article to keep up to date with all the latest rumours concerning Apple’s next generation iPhone.








In Depth: iPhone through the ages: just how much has it changed?
Via: TechRadar
Author: TechRadar
February 27, 2015 at 06:36AM


The birth of Apple’s superphone

It was January 2007 when Steve Jobs took to the stage of the Moscone Center San Francisco to announce the arrival of the iPhone, which went on sale worldwide later that year.

If you find it difficult to remember that far back, Leona Lewis was number one in the UK with A Moment Like This and people were flocking to the cinema to get teary-eyed at Will Smith in The Pursuit Of Happyness.

While our pop music and movie choices may not have improved much, smartphones were changed forever: from that point on, touchscreens, apps and digital media were the way forward.

iPhone 1 (first generation)

Launched: June 2007 (US), November 2007 (UK)

Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone as three devices in one: a touchscreen iPod, a revolutionary mobile phone, and a truly mobile web browser.

Now we take touchscreens, digital media playback and Web access for granted, but in 2007 the iPhone was unlike anything that had appeared before. Its 3.5-inch screen had a 320 x 480 pixel reoslution (one of the best displays of the time), with a 2MP camera built-in, and up to 8GB of storage.

Third-party apps were not yet allowed on “iPhone OS”. In the TechRadar review, we noted that despite several shortcomings, the phone had “changed the mobile device landscape… multitouch will prove to be a model for interfaces in the future.”

iPhone 3G (second generation)

Launched: July 2008

High-speed connectivity was big news in 2008, which is why the second generation iPhone included 3G in its moniker (rather confusingly, as this was the second generation iPhone). It also brought with it a thinner shape, a plastic back and - crucially - support for the newly launched App Store.

The app store model worked so well you’ll now find it replicated in everything from your smart TV to yourWindows 8 laptop, and the change helped Apple’s phone really start to gain traction.

We said in our iPhone 3G review promised that buyers would be “amazed by the function and feel of this handset.” The iPhone era had begun in earnest.

iPhone 3GS (third generation)

Launched: June 2009

The iPhone 3GS upgrade was viewed as disappointingly minor at the time, but look at the detail and a different picture emerges: as well as faster performance, the new handset offered a better 3.2MP camera (that could now record video as well as take photos), extra storage options and voice control (the precursor to Siri).

The display was the same 3.5-inch 320 x 480 screen, and the device’s appearance remained largely unchanged from the 3G model. TechRadar’s take on the unit praised the multimedia and internet capabilities while still finding niggles with the camera, call quality and battery life – this was the first of the more iterative updates to the iPhone but did enough to keep users happy.

iPhone 4 (fourth generation)

Launched: June 2010

If the 3GS was a minor upgrade, the iPhone 4 was a serious step up - a new, flat design with an integrated antenna (although questions were raised about how you held the device) a high-resolution Retina display (640 x 960 pixels) that showed the rest of the world how it was done and a superior 5MP camera (featuring HD video recording) on top of internal performance improvements.

The competition was catching up, and Apple had responded in brilliant fashion. We were certainly impressed, despite some reservations about the high price, saying “it’s intriguing to see record-breaking numbers queuing up to pick up this device - but after playing with it for a few days, you can see why.”

iPhone 4S to now

iPhone 4S (fifth generation)

Launched: October 2011

Apple pulled out the “S” tag again for the fifth generation handset, indicating a minor upgrade rather than a major overhaul.

The design of the iPhone 4S was the same, but inside was Apple’s new A5 processor, vastly improved graphics capabilities and an 8MP camera with 1080p video recording. iOS was evolving at the same rate as the hardware, of course, and Siri began life as an iPhone 4S exclusive.

The improvements were enough to persuade us to describe it as “the best thing Apple has ever created” in the official TechRadar review.

iPhone 5 (sixth generation)

Launched: September 2012

Six handsets later, Apple finally decided it was time to tweak the iPhone’s screen size and aspect ratio.

Coming in at 20% lighter than its predecessor, the 2012 iPhone adopted a 4-inch screen running at 640 x 1136 pixels.

Otherwise, despite the usual speed bump and a stronger antenna, it was very much business as usual in terms of the design and capabilities.

Our biggest gripe in our iPhone 5 review was with the aging iOS, but with iOS 7 arriving on September 18 that issue is very much negated, which will please a number of iPhone 5 users who’ve been holding onto the handset for nearly a year.

iPhone 5S/5C (seventh generation)

Launched: September 2013

The big step in the seventh stage of the iPhone’s evolution was the arrival of the iPhone 5C, a slightly cheaper, plastic-backed model to help battle Android in the busy mobile middle market. The signs were there already — remember Apple kept the iPhone 4 and 4S on sale during the iPhone 5 era.

Apart from the plastic shell and larger battery though the iPhone 5C was a carbon copy of the iPhone 5 in terms of specs - which was retired to make way for the two new handsets.

As for the flagship iPhone 5S, it was a case of under-the-hood improvements again: more power, a better camera, and a fancy fingerprint reader hidden under the home button. The bigger changes arrived with iOS 7, the most radical revamp of the mobile operating system since the App Store arrived back in 2008.

iPhone 6/6 Plus (eighth generation)

Launched: September 2014

After the smaller changes that came with the iPhone 5C and iPhone 5S, Apple was back to its revolutionary best with the following generation as the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus brought the biggest alterations in design and features since the leap from the iPhone 4S to the iPhone 5.

The most striking change the eighth generation iPhones ushered in was undoubtedly the screen size, with the iPhone 6’s display leaping from the iPhone 5’s 4-inches to 4.7-inches. Apple also upped the resolution from the 1136 x 640 of previous iPhones to 1334 x 750. This meant that the larger screen still had a high pixel density of 326ppi (pixels per inch), so image quality remains incredibly sharp and detailed.

As the name suggests the iPhone 6 Plus went even larger with a whopping 5.5-inch display, marking Apple’s first foray into the phablet market. The iPhone 6 Plus also got a resolution boost to full high definition, 1920 x 1080. With a pixel density of 401ppi not only does the iPhone 6 Plus have the largest screen of any iPhone ever, but it also has the clearest as well.

The iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus also benefit from Apple’s use of “dual-domain pixels”, which along with the 1300:1 contrast ratio makes the screen on the handsets look absolutely fantastic.

Both the iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6 Plus also ditched the industrial and sharp-edged design that had been with the iPhone for four generations in favour of a more ergonomically-pleasing chassis with a screen that curves into a body with rounded edges and corners.

Both handsets feature metal backs, and as we pointed out in our reviews they take a lot of design language from the iPad Air, resulting in a product that looks and feels genuinely premium.

Another big change is that the boosted screen sizes and the corresponding increase in body dimensions has meant that the power button now resides on the right-hand side of the devices.

Along with the launch of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus Apple released iOS 8, which kept much of the flat aesthetics of iOS 7 and ushered in some neat new features.

It wasn’t a completely smooth launch, however, and after only a few months Apple has already patched it to iOS 8.1.3 in a bid to squash bugs and fix problems.

The rocky launch of iOS 8 was in stark contrast to the assured releases of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, with Apple proudly announcing that the two iPhones broke the company’s records for pre-orders in the first night they were available.

iPhone 6S/7

Launching: September 2015

This brings us bang up to date, so what does Apple have in store for its next iPhone? We’re still not sure if we’ll see an iPhone 6S or an entirely new iPhone 7.

However we have been hearing plenty of rumours and speculation about the next generation iPhone already, for example it will have “the biggest camera jump ever”, featuring a two-lens system which could apparently rival DSLRs in quality.

Sony has recently announced a 21MP stacked CMOS sensor which can focus on fast moving objects and includes HDR for 4K video and high-resolution photos. What’s interesting is that Sony currently supplies Apple with camera modules, so we might see some of that tech in the next iPhone.

It will almost certainly come with a new processor, most likely called the A9, and the rumours we’ve heard suggest that Samsung will build the chip that will be 15% smaller, 20% more powerful and 35% more power efficient than the Apple A8 processor found in the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus.

Could the iPhone 6S or iPhone 7 follow in the footsteps of the Galaxy Note Edge? We don’t think it’s particularly likely, but there have been rumours that Apple might try something drastic with the screen.

Rumours once again hint at the upcoming iPhone having a rugged sapphire display, while others hint at Apple going for a smaller 4-inch design in a bid to appease people who weren’t too keen on the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus’ increased dimensions.

It looks like Apple could also be preparing to launch iOS 9 alongside the iPhone 6S/iPhone 7, with reports claiming a beta program to test iOS 9 will run over the summer – perhaps to make sure there are no repeats of iOS 8’s troubled launch.

Make sure you keep an eye on our iPhone 7 release date, news and rumors article to keep up to date with all the latest rumours concerning Apple’s next generation iPhone.



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Htc android phones list

Htc android phones list

htc android phones list

Bonus htc android phones list

Hopefully more info will be added in the near future. HTC is producing award-winning handsets, and LG is bringing up the supercheap superphone brigade. 3 to the Droid X on Friday, May 27. • HTC EVO Shift 4G [UPDATED 6/16/11]: Sprint made the Android 2. We expect more phones to receive the update over the next several…

View On WordPress

Updated: Best Android phone - which should you buy?
Via: TechRadar
Author: Matt Hanson
February 24, 2015 at 05:08AM


Best Android phone: 10 - 6

Our verdict on the best Android phones - constantly updated

There’s one key way in which Android is massively different from its Apple-branded smartphone competition - the number of phones out there running Google’s hot mobile OS.

Samsung makes loads of them. Sony’s making three every second. HTC is producing award-winning handsets, and LG is bringing up the supercheap superphone brigade. On top of that, there’s a glut of other names in the mix, with the likes of Acer, ZTE, Huawei and OnePlus all offering cheap smartphones - and Google’s gone high end with the Nexus range.

FutTv : X07b7PVMTE6VW

The many variations in screen size, processor power, software features and design makes finding the best Android phone for you extremely tough.

To help find the best Android phone for you, we’ve rounded up the best Android handsets out there today, rating the phones on hardware performance, OS upgrade potential and, of course, how shiny and nice they are to have and boast about to work colleagues.

So here they are - the best Android phones money can buy today. For many, many different reasons.

10. Samsung Galaxy S5

The Samsung Galaxy S5 is an excellent phone, that’s why it continues to make it into the top ten, and it’s jam packed full of tech to keep you on the cutting edge.

It’s got a fantastic 5.1-inch display, super fast Snapdragon 801 processor and a high performing 16MP camera.

There are also some more unusual additions including a fingerprint scanner hidden beneath the home key, a dust and waterproof chassis and a heart rate monitor on the back - pretty pointless but fun to show off. Plus it already has Android 5.0 Lollipop, so its software is up to date.

The Galaxy S5 loses marks for its all plastic design which results in it feeling a little toy like, and the heavy TouchWiz UI which comes with a whole heap of bloatware.

Quick verdict

If you opt for the Galaxy S5 you will be very happy with what you get - especially if you’re a Samsung fan - but it you want something which feels as premium as its price tag take a look at some of the better ranking entries.

9. HTC Desire 820


This is a big phone that seems to keep on giving - it’s a phablet with the price of a cheaper phone. Eight cores. 2GB of RAM. A 13MP camera - it’s certainly a well-specified proposition.

The polycarbonate ‘Double Shot’ design is really neat too - if you can’t make a phone out of metal, it should look like this instead, as it still oozes premium quality that HTC has clearly nabbed from the high end One range.

It’s also 64-bit, which makes it a lot more cutting edge and able to handle some harder apps - although the functionality is a little wasted at 2GB of RAM. Doesn’t hurt to have, though.

Quick verdict

The Desire 820 never suffered from slow down, and has given it the tools needed to make the most of Android Lollipop if and when it arrives - plus the design deserves an internet high five.

If you’re looking for a big handset for a budget price tag, the HTC Desire 820 is likely to cross your path - it might not have the specs to fight the best on this list, but it’s a fun proposition nonetheless.

8. OnePlus One

It’s probably safe to say that the OnePlus One took almost everyone by surprise. It arrived with little fanfare from a new company, yet it turns out it’s one of the top ten Android phones on the planet.

With a full HD 5.5 inch display, 2.5GHz quad-core processor and 3GB of RAM it’s got the specs to compete with anything else out there, but what really makes it stand out is the price, because at just £229 SIM-free it beats out the Nexus 5 as the best value high end phone available.

In fact it’s roughly half the price of competitors like the HTC One M8 and Samsung Galaxy S5, so with that in mind it’s easy to forgive the lack of a microSD card slot and the questionable call quality, and with its tweakable CyanogenMod OS it’s even a little bit different.

It’s set to keep on delivering too, as CyanogenMod will soon optionally be replaced by OnePlus’ own OxygenOS rocking Android 5.0.

Quick Verdict

When it comes to sheer value for money it’s hard to beat the OnePlus One. Its build might not be as high end as the HTC One M8 but for what it costs we’re surprised it even has a screen.

Speaking of the screen, it might be a little on the large side for some users and price aside the phone isn’t quite up to the standards of the HTC One M8, LG G3 or the Sony Xperia Z3, but it sure comes close.

7. Moto X (2014)


2014’s edition of the Moto X might have the same name as 2013’s version, but thankfully Motorola has been more creative with the specs of its latest flagship than with its name.

Motorola has boosted the hardware in a number of key areas for the latest Moto X. It has a larger 5.2-inch 1080p screen, an improved 13-megapixel camera, and some handy new pre-installed apps – which is something we don’t usually say about apps that come with smartphones.

It’s also due to get an upgrade to Google’ new Android 5.0 Lollipop mobile operating system any day now. Powering all of this is some pretty decent hardware including a quad-core Snapdragon 801 processor and 2GB of RAM. The Moto X comes in 16GB and 32GB flavours, which should be just about enough for most but remember: there’s no expandable storage.

Quick verdict

The name might not have changed, but there have been improvements where it counts with Motorola’s latest flagship phone. Customer feedback has influenced a number of aspects of the new and improved Moto X, with the handset sporting a bigger screen and aluminium metal frame alongside a seriously competitive price.

It’s not perfect, with the camera still average and a lack of a micro SD card slot, but the Moto X does a great job of earning its place in our top ten.

6. Sony Xperia Z3


Sony released its successor to the Xperia Z2 a mere six months after its release. Because of the quick turn around we weren’t expecting a revolutionary new handset. What the Sony Xperia Z3 does manage to do is improve on the already excellent Xperia Z2 in some key areas.

The screen is a large 5.2-inches with a full 1080p resolution. Technology behind the screen gives a boost to the overall brightness of the display which makes it look fantastic.

The Xperia Z3 also packs some impressive specs with a quad-core 2.5GHz processor, Adreno 330 GPU and 3GB of RAM.

These improved specs are all housed in a slimmer and more stylishly designed chassis, giving the Xperia Z3 a truly premium feel. It’s also water and dust resistant as well.

Quick verdict

The Sony Xperia Z3 does a lot of things right, with some excellent hardware specs and a stylish design. If you own a PlayStation 4 then the Remote Play feature that lets you stream PS4 games to the handset could be of real interest - and if it’s not, it should be.

It’s a great phone and it’s set to get even better as Sony has confirmed that it will be one of its first handsets to get Android Lollipop, but the experience isn’t quite flawless enough to get it any higher in our charts with a disappointing camera and buggy software being chief among its problems.

Best Android phone: 5-1

5. Google Nexus 6


Google Nexus 6 is a supersized version of the new Moto X that has been given a two-handed booster shot and appropriately received a post-surgery Lollipop.

The phone that everyone expected to be a supercheap device is now firmly in the ‘Hmmm… I wonder how much can I get for my kidney?’ category - but that’s thanks to the high-end chipset, the crisply sharp QHD screen and a massive battery.

At six inches, this is very, very much a phablet - but then again, it offers so much that you’ll really start to warm to it quickly. Plus the edge-to-edge design means it’s nowhere near as large as it should be - if you can get over the price, it’s a must have.

Quick verdict

There’s a lot to like about Nexus 6. We love Android Lollipop and it looks great on this bright, 6-inch AMOLED display. It’s not filled with all of the pre-installed apps that you’ll never use either.

The 13-megapixel camera is more true-to-life than last year’s Nexus 5 and Motorola’s other smartphones combined, even if it doesn’t quite measure up what Samsung’s doing.

This is the best Nexus Google has ever crafted. And, when you think about it, you’re not going to need to hold onto your money, as you’ll require both hands to grab onto this two-handed monster.

4. Sony Xperia Z3 Compact

You might be thinking ‘a compact version charting higher than the flagship? Techradar has lost it!’, but hear us out. Sony has done such a good job of shrinking down the Xperia Z3 into a smaller handset with only a few minor cuts to the specifications that it has, perhaps by accident, created a more desirable handset.

There’s a reason the Xperia Z3 Compact is the only mini variant on this list, with the HTC One Mini 2 or Samsung Galaxy S5 Mini nowhere in sight. Unlike those other phones, Sony has managed to keep the specifications of the Z3 Compact broadly the same as the larger version.

It has the same 2.5GHz quad-core Snapdragon 801 processor along with an Adreno 330 GPU and very good 20.7MP camera.

The smaller 4.6-inch screen gives the Z3 Compact a better battery life than the full size Z3, as well as being more comfortable to hold. The price has also been cut, making the Z3 Compact a more compelling purchase.

Quick verdict

Easily the best compact Android phone on the market today. Sony has worked hard to fit some excellent features into this handset despite its smaller stature and it has paid off.

Not only does it work very well in the hand, we really like the translucent stylings on the outside of the chassis and like its larger sibling it should be getting a Lollipop upgrade very soon. This is great work from Sony, and doubly brilliant if you own a PS4 too thanks to the Remote Play feature.

3. Samsung Galaxy Note 4

Four years after the original Galaxy Note kick started the phablet craze, the Galaxy Note 4 arrives to show that Samsung still has what it takes to make excellent super sized smartphones.

This is a top of the range smartphone with a wallet-trembling price tag to boot. But what you do get for your money is a fantastic 5.7-inch QHD Super AMOLED screen along with a 2.7GHz quad-core processor and 3GB of RAM.

With these specs it easily outperforms its closest rivals such as the iPhone 6 Plus and HTC One M8 and it should soon be getting even better with a Lollipop boost expected early this year.

Quick verdict

The Samsung Galaxy Note 4 certainly isn’t cheap, but a fantastic screen, brilliant specs and a great camera all help justify the hefty asking price.

If you’re in the market for a large smartphone then you’ll definitely want to seriously consider the Galaxy Note 4.

2. LG G3

The big selling point for the LG G3 is its display, with a QHD (that’s 1440 x 2560) resolution, making it pin sharp. While there’s not a huge amount of content to take advantage of that res just yet, you can be safe in knowledge the G3 is future proof.

Away from the screen and things are still good for the G3 with a punchy 2.5GHz quad-core Snapdragon 801 processor, 3GB of RAM and an Adreno 330 GPU ensuring the interface, widgets, apps and games all speed along at a rate of knots. It’s also now got Android 5.0 Lollipop in most places.

The design is a little questionable with a faux-metal rear, and the 5.5-inch display means the G3 is a little on the large side which will put those with small hands off. Get past those small facts though and this is a top quality smartphone with a boat-load to offer.

Quick verdict

If you want the latest and greatest screen technology in the palm of your hand the LG G3 is the smartphone for you, but the whole package isn’t quite there.

The LG G3 is a great handset that’s more phablet than phone - and it’s only slightly let down by lacklustre design.

1. HTC One M8

We love the speed of the camera, the Duo Camera is sharp as a tack, the BoomSound upgrade is impressive and the design… well, you have to hold it. The HTC One M8 is an excellent package

The Snapdragon 801 processor has boosted battery dramatically, and that means that photos also process much more quickly as well - even the front-facing camera is much better.

Gaming, movies, photography, browsing all work really well, and in a phone that easily destroy whatever almost anyone else can design, even giving the iPhone 6 a run for its money. HTC is committed to its baby too, as Android Lollipop has already started rolling out to it.

Quick verdict

The only way to know how good the HTC One M8 is, is to go into a store, pick it up and hold it for a few minutes. Take in the design, listen to the BoomSound speakers and glide around the Sense UI.

Of course the One M8 won’t be for everyone, and the Xperia Z3, OnePlus One and Galaxy S5 are seriously tempting propositions - but anyone looking for the perfect fusion of design and features need look no further.



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Review: Oppo N3

Introduction and design

A few short months ago, Oppo was barely a blip on the international radar. After moving beyond the bounds of Blu-Ray players, it first garnered international attention with the Find 5 superphone. At the time it was the first smartphone to launch with a 1080p screen onboard, beating the HTC One and Samsung Galaxy S4 to the punch, and gaining Oppo the attention it rightly deserved.

Fast forward to the latter months of 2013 and Oppo had introduced the Oppo N1: another flagship to take over from where the Find 5 left off. This time, the headline spec was the rotating camera, a feature not seen since the Nokia N90.

Its latest flagship the N3, takes queues from the N1 and enhances the camera’s rotational skills as well as bumping the other specifications all round.

Alongside the 16MP rotating camera, there’s a 5.5-inch 1080p IPS LCD screen, a quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 801 processor clocked at 2.3GHz, 2GB of RAM, 32GB of onboard storage, fingerprint reader and dual-SIM capability (and one of the SIM slots also doubles as a micro-SD card reader).

These are most of the specs you’d expect, meaning the N3 matches up with most other 2014 top-end phones such as the Samsung Galaxy S5 and the budget-priced OnePlus One, but has the Chinese smartphone giant done enough to entice a Western audience to try a brand that is still relatively unknown?

Right off the bat there’s a few things to notice; most other top smartphones of this size are now rocking a QHD-resolution screen, and while Oppo has skinned Android 4.4.4 with its very own Color OS interface, the downside means there’s no Android 5.0 Lollipop onboard just yet.

The swivelling camera and Chinese roots meant the Oppo N3 was never going to be totally down to earth, and the overall design is a bit of a mixed bag. I was impressed by the solid build quality and the premium feel that the circumferencing aluminium band lends it.

The rest of the phone however, is plastic. The back and front trim that surrounds the screen is made from a matte polycarbonate, which feels nice in the hand, but isn’t overly exciting.

The faux leather stitching that borders the camera module is a visual styling ripped straight from the memories of Samsung’s Galaxy Note 3. It’s certainly not my idea of stylish, and I honestly think the N3 would have looked better sticking with the same matte plastic on the camera module as used on the rest of the body.

The N3’s screen is a 1920 x 1080 5.5-inch IPS LCD which equates to a comfortable 403PPI resolution. Sure, some other flagships are running QHD displays, but that’s for little other than bragging rights on screens of this size. There’s a natural colour temperature and whites as bright as you would expect from an IPS panel.

Auto-brightness can be a little slow to respond, and isn’t always smooth, but I suspect this could be fixed in a future software update. It could be something to do with the fact that the auto-brightness sensor is built into the camera module, so you need to always ensure it’s the right way round in order for auto brightness to respond properly.

Oppo has chosen a combination of capacitive buttons below the touch-screen in lieu of on-screen adaptive icons, which is not necessarily a bad thing as it affords more usable screen real-estate. The downside is that they are only visible when the backlight is in operation, meaning you may well end up pressing the wrong button if used to an alternative button layout.

The backlight is also disappointingly weak; I don’t want to be distracted from the screen by super-bright LEDs, but equally they could have been at least half as bright again.

On top of the right side of the phone you’ll find a 3.5mm headphone socket and lower down, the curiously diminutive volume rocker. The left edge is home to the power/wake button with the SIM/micro-SD tray above it, and a micro-USB connector down at the bottom.

The buttons sit almost exactly where you’d want them to with the phone firmly positioned in your hand, but I’m at a total loss as to why Oppo would put the micro-USB and headphone sockets on opposing corners. It looks untidy when you dock it, means that the phone feels even more gigantic if you have it in a pocket with headphones plugged in, and generally seems like a compromise was made somewhere along the way.

The bottom has a curious ‘bridge’ that covers the primary microphone and speaker grille, from which the ‘Skyline’ notification LED also radiates. This bridge helps the glowing notification LED illuminate more widely, and possibly helps direct the sound from the speaker back towards the user, while making it almost impossible to inadvertently cover over.

Oppo’s reasoning behind this additional curve and choice of notification LED positioning means that the it’s altogether less distracting and works whether the phone is facing up or down.

The back houses a secondary microphone just below the 16MP swivelling camera module, an embossed Oppo logo and recessed fingerprint reader in a similar position to that found on the HTC One Max.

Key features and interface

While the camera is clearly the headline on the Oppo N3 (more on that later), there are a number of other features to note that help the N3 stand out against the vast array of other smartphones.

First and foremost, the fingerprint reader, while not being a feature Oppo is shouting about particularly loudly, works surprisingly well. With the N3 held in the right hand your forefinger rests pretty comfortably onto the reader, allowing you to unlock the phone with a simple click, rather than the unwieldy swipes some other phones demand.

Pressing the reader also wakes the phone, meaning you can wake and unlock the N3 quite simply with just one finger. Should you want to share the phone with others, or have the flexibility of using multiple digits, the N3 can be taught up to five fingerprints.

A relatively standard feature in the far-east perhaps, the dual-SIM capability is now finally becoming a more wide-spread feature in phones here in the UK, including the incredibly cheap Huawei Honor 3C.

It essentially means users can choose to use their phone for both business and pleasure; the N3 is capable of taking one nano-SIM and a secondary micro-SIM.

One slight downside is that the micro-SIM slot also doubles as the micro-SD card slot, meaning users will have to choose between either additional storage on top of the phone’s 32GB built-in capacity, or a secondary SIM.

Oppo has included a little gadget called the O-Click. It’s a key-fob sized accessory that can be used to remotely trigger the camera, find your phone or control playback music.

You can even set it up to give you an alert if it goes out of range of your N3, meaning you’ll never forget your phone again. It’s a nice little extra that feels like a welcome bonus Oppo could have easily charged a few extra quid for.

Interface

Android 5.0 Lollipop is finally making its way to a variety of smartphones, including many that were launched in the earlier part of 2014 such as the HTC One M8.

The N3 is still on Android 4.4.4 and because of the heavily skinned Color OS that Oppo has employed, it is unlikely to see the Lollipop update until later in the year. if ever. Fortunately, this previous version of Android has full compatibility with all aspects of Google’s services, and it doesn’t hamper the experience in any way.

Color OS is a Chinese version of Android that is heavily skinned to look drastically different from the stock Google OS. It has been used previously on a variety of phones in Mainland China, and featured on the Asian version of the OnePlus One.

The first main difference you will notice when you first start using the N3 is that Color OS does away with the Android app drawer, keeping everything on the home screen. You’ll have to be pretty diligent and employ the folders to keep your home screen tidy.

Fortunately Oppo offers a seemingly unlimited amount of home screens at your disposal. I got bored after adding a 28th home screen page, so I’m pretty sure no one will ever run out of space to add as many widgets and shortcuts as they desire.

Like many other Android skins, there is the ability to change the theme, with Oppo pre-loading its own ‘theme store’, which is filled with a wide variety of themes that change the wallpaper, icons and the overall look of the operating system.

Some of the themes are childish, others are chintzy, but there are one or two that are worth the download to customise the look of your phone. Personally, I switched onto the ‘Jelly Bean’ theme and breathed a partial sigh of relief.

Whatever theme you choose, the notifications pane has had the once over by Oppo, offering all the setting toggles you might need at the flick of a finger. There’s everything from Bluetooth and NFC switches, to an emergency ‘lock now’ toggle, and a very handy flashlight toggle.

Should you have lots of notifications pending, the toggles will shuffle upwards and only consume a single line, offering the most popular setting adjustments; to access the full quota, a settings shortcut is always to hand in the top right of the pane. To clear notifications, simply tap the ‘brush’ icon that shows up at the bottom of the notification pane.

Speaking of settings, Oppo has split the settings menu into three separate tabs, similar to that which you would find on the Touchwiz-toting Samsung Galaxy S5. The ‘general’ tab houses most of the main settings, covering wireless and networks, accounts & security and system options.

The second tab covers everything concerned with the phone’s sounds and notifications, and also allows you to enable the ‘Maxx Audio’ setup, which offers a selection of preset sound modes, and the ability to manually adjust them with a graphic equaliser or bass, treble, volume and dialog sliders.

Color OS comes pre-loaded with a bespoke weather app, backup and restore functionality, as well as access to the NearMe cloud services that allow contact and SMS backup, and a ‘find my phone’ function.

Overall, it isn’t the worst Android skin I’ve used and I’d honestly rather use this than Samsung’s Touchwiz, but I’d still choose Google’s original OS interface any day.

Performance and battery life

Having a 2.3GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 801 processor on board, accompanied by an Adreno 330 GPU and 2GB of RAM it’s no real surprise that the Oppo N3 flies along in day-to-day usage. It’s a similar combination of hardware found in the OnePlus One, Samsung Galaxy S5 and Sony Xperia Z2.

There was not a hint of slow-down, no matter which apps I was zipping in and out of, and top-end games that have started to show the age of my own HTC One worked flawlessly on the N3.

So now you may be wondering whether the N3’s apparent speed translated well into a good set of benchmark scores, and happily the answer was yes. I ran the Geekbench 3 app, which tests a variety of performance aspects, to come up with two scores: one for single and one for multi-core processing.

The N3 scored an average of 963 in the single-core test, and 2763 in the multi-core test, putting it in the same realm as Samsung’s S5 and the HTC One M8.

For making the most of the 3000mAh battery, Oppo has included a battery manager, which allows you to turn down the power, and in return get a little more longevity out of the N3. There is also a ‘Super Power-saving’ mode, similar to HTC’s Extreme Power Saving mode, which limits the phone’s functionality to give even longer battery life. It’s a feature that many brands are now incorporating into Android in one form or another, and is gladly received here on the N3.

Although it doesn’t have the latest Qualcomm processor onboard, and chooses to stick with 2GB of RAM rather than the 3GB you’ll find in the Sony Xperia Z3, everything I could throw at the N3 was handled quite admirably, without a hint of slow-down.

Battery life

A 3000mAh battery is now par for the course on top-end Android handsets. Anything less and the phone would likely struggle to make it through the day.

I’m happy to report that the N3 made it through a long day full of music play back, the odd dabble in games, as well as regular checks of social media apps and my regularly-visited web sites of choice.

It’s not inconceivable to think that the N3 could make it close to 48 hours of uptime with careful usage, and by employing the power-saving modes available.

As always, I put the phone under an intensive test by running our HD video of choice at full brightness with all the power-saving modes disabled and volume turned up.

After running the 90 minute video, the battery had dropped from fully charged down to 75% - a drop of 25% which betters the iPhone 6 Plus, puts it right alongside the LG G3, but doesn’t manage to perform quite as well as the Nexus 6, which only dropped 17%.

The essentials and camera

Let’s not forget the bare necessitates when we look at an all-singing, all-dancing smartphones such as this. There’s still the ever-so-2005 functions of telephone calls and SMS messaging to consider.

In this department I’m happy to report that the Oppo N3 makes both functions straight forward and easy to get-to-grips with. Calling and texting can be accessed directly from the lock screen for fast response to missed calls and texts.

Neither are crammed with any particularly ground-breaking special features, but they are the definition of functional. There’s a whiff of Apple’s iOS that binds the design of both apps, though this isn’t necessarily a bad thing, just a bit lazy.

The primary internet browser included on the N3 is based upon Android’s stock browser, but, as with many other aspects of the phone, it has had a fresh lick of paint applied in the form of an overhauled UI.

Perhaps because of the over-sized display, Oppo has cleverly moved the main navigation and menu buttons to the foot of the browser window.

There are front and back keys; a home key which brings up a page of easy-access bookmarks and well known favourites such as Google, Facebook and Twitter; and a menu button which brings up a further set of options such as a high-contrast night mode, a full screen browsing toggle and various other additional settings.

Overall I rather liked Oppo’s own browser, and think it has done a good job of making it work well on a large screen. If, however, you can’t get on with it, Google’s Chrome is pre-installed as a safe alternative.

Music playback is handled via a relatively sparse app that allows you to create playlists, choose favourite tracks and even search for new music via the phone’s mic, similar to Shazam.

On the homepage, Oppo dedicates a special page to music playback that presents you with a record-player interface that allows you to swipe the needle arm onto the record in order to start music playback. It’s quite fun the first few times, but ultimately a bit of a worthless gimmick.

Browsing photos and other pictures on the N3 is also taken over by Oppo’s own app. Like all the other Color OS apps I’ve encountered so far, the interface is simple yet acceptable.

Pictures are displayed in a collage-like fashion, though there doesn’t appear to be any special algorithms behind the screen making ‘better’ photos stand out.

One built-in feature that users might enjoy is the ability to create photo collages from any of the photos or pictures on your phone and save them as a single image. While there’s a million other apps out there that will do the same thing, having the feature built into the gallery is a nice little touch.

The video app? Oppo’s designers clearly ran out of steam with this one. It’s bland and totally devoid of any special features. One major upside, however, is that the app natively plays MKV files, a common format for ‘downloaded’ movies, without a hitch.

Camera

Here’s the bit you have probably come to this review for, and overall it doesn’t disappoint.

The Oppo N3 is the first smartphone to have a fully motorised camera that is both your front, and rear facing camera. This means the 16MP camera with Schneider Kreznauch lens is for both high-res selfies and gorgeous landscapes.

After a little glitch with the app which caused the screen to go black when changing to front-facing mode (fixed with a side-load of the latest camera app), I was away and snapping. Slowly swipe downwards on the camera preview screen to make the camera module tilt upwards.

This gives you quite versatile shooting angles, although a colleague pointed out that it could be responsible for some rather naughty candid-camera public photography.

A quicker downward swipe flips the camera around for your selfies, and once you’re done, another fast upward swipe brings the camera back around to rear-facing mode. Fortunately, when you do switch modes, the camera app knows what to do and spins the view around too, otherwise all your selfies would be upside-down.

The module itself, apart from the ghastly faux leather stitching, feels solid and secure, and can be manually positioned should you wish. One neat feature that I found really handy is that even with the phone in sleep mode, you can quickly wake and get straight to snapping photos by spinning the camera around.

My biggest concern? Cases. What kind of fully-protective cases will accommodate for the camera module? The answer, unfortunately, is a case that won’t cover the camera module whatsoever.

As for the camera app itself, more work has gone into this than most of the other replacement apps, and considering the camera is the phone’s headline feature, this is no real surprise.

Swipe up from the shutter icon and you are given a range of different camera modes such as ‘Ultra HD’, a night mode, an ‘auto panorama’ mode (which automatically rotates the lens to capture a wide panorama), ‘beautify’ mode and an ‘expert’ mode.

'Normal' mode is more like an automatic camera mode, and does well to cope in most lighting conditions without the need to switch settings.

The ‘expert’ mode allows easy control of exposure, ISO, white balance and manual focus. It’s definitely a nice touch and afforded the opportunity to tinker with photos when the opportunity arose.

Get bored of the included photo modes? Well Oppo has made it easy to add on more. Currently available are a HDR mode (which probably should have been pre-installed), alongside a unique RAW capture mode and a’super macro mode’ (read: digital zoom).

There’s also an ‘after focus’ which, as the name suggests, lets you change the focus of an image after you’ve taken the photo. It’s a great idea in principle, but as it relies on software processing, the effect isn’t that pronounced.

If you are willing to spend the time in Adobe Lightroom, the RAW mode can gift you some truly excellent photos, but at the expense of phone storage. Each picture weighs in at about 30MB rather than the usual 3-4MB.

There are plenty more features to explore, such as a ‘soft light’ mode which turns on just one of the two LED flashes to illuminate a scene without ‘flooding’ the image with harsh white light.

As for the photos themselves? Overall I was really impressed. There are a few minor hiccups such as the really poor stitching of panoramas which makes the auto panorama mode a bit of a let-down.

Having all those megapixels means that using it in front-facing mode is a real joy compared to a lot of other hampered low-res snappers such as the low-res 1.2MP front camera on the Apple iPhone 6.

For day-to-day snapping, the camera launches quickly and has all the features and filters you could want, and admirably keeps up with competition from the other top smartphone snappers such as that found in the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 or the Nokia Lumia 930.

Where video is concerned, I was surprised to see 4K and HDR video omitted, though the 1080p video is still of usable quality. It’s almost like Oppo got so carried away with making the N3 great at stills, it forgot to do anything with the video capabilities.

Camera samples

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Verdict

The Oppo N3 is a top-tier smartphone in many ways, with some truly unique features and an operating system that might be quite different to stock Android, but doesn’t ruin the phone.

While some of the key specifications compare with flagships that were arriving this time in 2014, there’s nothing onboard that hampers the performance. A speedy quad-core processor, decent screen quality, good storage and SIM options make the N3 a definite contender, if a bit of an oddball.

If you like standing out from the crowd, are sold on the quirky camera, and don’t mind the rather large form factor, then the N3 should definitely be considered alongside other 5.5-inch phones like the LG G3.

We liked

The camera is undoubtedly unique, and a feature you’ll be showing off to anyone who cares to notice. Fortunately, it’s not all show without substance, there is some good hardware underneath and the camera app is packed with plenty of features.

The body feels solid and well made compared to many other Chinese smartphones hitting the European market. Even with the spinning camera module, there aren’t any squeaks from the chassis when put under pressure.

The positioning of the notification LED is well thought out, and the rhythmic pulse is far less annoying than some overly-bright blinking LEDs found on other handsets.

The O-Click Bluetooth fob was a welcome addition I hadn’t expected, and has some legitimately useful features for the forgetful among us, while doubling as a remote camera trigger that opens up the capabilities of the phone’s camera even further.

We disliked

The headphone and micro-USB ports are in totally daft positions. Whether this was a limitation imposed by the design of the internal hardware, or a short-sighted decision by Oppo is difficult to determine, but whatever the excuse, it’s plain nuts.

The swivelling camera might be fun and afford some great quality snaps, but it throws up a couple of pitfalls. Firstly, it limits the options of protective phone cases considerably, meaning you would have to take good care of this large handset. It can also mean that the auto-brightness sensor is often in the wrong place, which considering that the auto brightness is already a bit poorly executed, is a bit of a let-down.

This may well be subjective, but the N3 is a rather large phone. It’s in the same territory as the Google Nexus 6, and other top-end ‘phablets’, but doesn’t quite keep up when it comes to screen resolution.

Color OS has some nice features, but it’s certainly not my Android skin of choice. Oppo has almost gone too far to replace apps that aren’t broken in stock Android phones. Overall, I’d rather have Android as Google intended.

Final verdict

For $649 (around £400, AU$800) the Oppo N3 is a considerable amount of phone for your money, and has some well executed features. The most obviously of which is the swivelling camera that’ll wow your friends and change the way you use a smartphone camera.

Of course, you may be afraid to go for a brand that is relatively unknown in the western world, but in its native China, Oppo is fast becoming a household name, and are renowned for building quality electronics with novel features: the N3 is no exception.

Yes, there are a few quirks and bugs in the Color OS interface. I’m not generally a fan of third-party Android skins, and that hasn’t changed with the N3, but I can certainly say that at all times it felt speedy and responsive.

Want a phone with a party trick, big screen and novel features? The Oppo N3 should at least be in your ‘maybe’ pile.

First reviewed: December 2014










By:Ben Stinson
#kiddgoth