Mitsubishi Mirage (2013) review: capable and fun, but never refined

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WE TESTED
2013 Mitsubishi Mirage LS in Pop Green with black/pink interior, equipped with the CVT automatic
About $17,000 on the road

PROS
+ Nimble and quick around town
+ Economical engine
+ Easy to park

CONS
– Noisy engine and transmission
– Floaty ride and steering
– Questionable quality

The Mitsubishi Mirage is a fun and capable supermini, but it does not offer the refined experience of some competitors.

The 2013 Mitsubishi Mirage reintroduces a well-known name to the Australian market after a ten year absence.  The last Mirage sold well, but with the exception of the forgettable Colt, Mitsubishi has been without a good supermini.  The Mirage, which promises generous standard equipment, fun looks promoted through Australia’s Next Top Model, and an easy-to-drive experience, aims not only to fill this gap in the range, but also compete with the best of the competition, including the class-leading Ford Fiesta.  In reality, the Mirage is acceptable for running around town, but the sharp pricing has required cost-cutting that is clearly visible in the Mirage’s sub-par refinement. 

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Drive
Responsive, but never a quiet experience

The Mirage has aimed for the fun-to-drive credentials of the Fiesta and the ease of the Toyota Yaris.  Mitsubishi have fallen short of these benchmarks with the Mirage.  While the 3-cylinder, 1.2-litre engine is responsive to pokes of the accelerator, it is quickly apparent this car is underpowered—with just 57kW of power available at a high 6,000 RPM, the Mirage must be worked hard in almost all situations, including in town.  With little soundproofing, engine and transmission whine constantly penetrate the cabin.  Part of the noise is attributable to the continuously variable (CVT) automatic transmission, which relies on a single gear rather then stepping quietly from rung to rung.  The steering, although light, feels floaty and disconnected from the road, and the narrow tires mean grip can feel limited.  We were pleased with the Mirage’s safety on Sydney’s notoriously poor roads on the wettest week of the year, though.  The Mirage’s suspension is not very compliant with lumps and bumps in the road, tending to jar uncomfortably over ruts and potholes.

Comfort
Lots of standard equipment, but it’s hard to get comfortable

For taller, male drivers—although hardly the target market—it is hard to get comfortable in the front of the Mirage, with little lateral support in the seat.  Smaller frames should be able to settle in, though, and the front of the Mirage is a fairly enjoyable place to be.  The gauges and dashboard are clear and easy to operate: the Mirage ditches the gimmicky design of some competitors, like the Fiat 500, for a simple design that works.  The quality of the materials used in the cabin, though, is questionable, with most surfaces featuring hard, scratchy plastic.  The driving position is particularly high even at the lowest setting, though.  Rear-seat passengers won’t appreciate the unsupportive bench seat, but the boxy design of the Mirage means headroom is not an issue anywhere in this car.  All passengers will benefit from the generous equipment levels, particularly on the LS, which includes Bluetooth for a mobile phone, iPod and auxiliary connectivity, electric windows, and air conditioning.

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Practicality
Useful and spacious, the Mirage delivers on its promise of practicality

Mitsubishi have made the most of the Mirage’s diminutive size—this is a car of just 3.7 metres, but it offers high levels of interior space, particularly in the front seats, where the cabin feels light and airy.  Storage space is abundant in the Mirage, with door bins, three cup holders and a sizeable glove box for everyday nicknacks.  The boot is on the small size with a narrow opening and just 235 litres of space, but standard folding seats near-triple this to 600 litres, so small flat-pack furniture boxes would be possible. 

Reliability and running costs
Low maintenance and running costs, but this new model has untested reliability

The proliferation of capped-price servicing in Australia means the Mirage is no exception, benefitting from Mitsubishi’s Diamond Advantage programme.  The Mirage needs to be serviced annually, and the first four annual services will cost $250 each, keeping maintenance costs low for a typical ownership period, and alleviating some concerns about future reliability and the quality of components.  Though Mitsubishi is a Japanese company, the Mirage is manufactured in Thailand—like the Ford Fiesta—and as a result, it doesn’t seem as solid as the German-constructed Volkswagen Up.  Safety equipment is fair, with six airbags, stability control, and brake assist.  The Mirage scored 34/37 in ANCAP crash testing, earning five stars.  A core strength of the Mirage is its fuel economy, which places it among the best in the supermini class: with the CVT automatic, the three-cylinder Mirage manages 4.9 litres per 100km on the combined cycle—and it only asks for cheap 90-RON unleaded fuel.

Value for money
All Mirages offer generous value

All Mirages, from the entry-level ES that costs about $14,000 on road, are equipped with the 1.2-litre three-cylinder petrol engine, and conveniences such as power steering, stability control, air conditioning, and Bluetooth streaming.  The mid-range ES Sport is essentially a body kit option pack that adds $1,000 to the price.  It adds alloy wheels and a spoiler.  The range-topping LS asks an additional $1,000, but includes the luxuries of automatic wipers (indecisive and annoying in our experience), and lights, as well as a smart entry system (although on our test car, this worked only half the time).  The LS also adds one-zone climate control.  The best balance of value and equipment remains the base ES, which keeps the price of entry particularly low while avoiding an unnecessary splash on the LS.

My Audi A2 never stop suprising me! 834km & the reserve light lit up. Still got 120km left before I need to fuel up. This still on 16”, my heavy foot, on only 38liters, 177.000km & 12year old car!!
#audi#A2#supermini#aluminum#fuelefficient#fuelsaver#supercar#epic#mašo#economical#fuckprius#fuckhybrid#dieselrules#3cylinder#vorsprungdurchtechniek#picoftheday#instanow#instapic#cargram (at Elljusspåret)

what time is it? It is by every star a different time, and each most falsely true; or so subhuman superminis declare
-nor all their times encompass me and you:
when are we never, but forever (host of eternity; not guests of seem) believe me, dear, clocks have enough to do
without confusing timelessness and time.
Time cannot children, poets, lovers tell- measure imagine, mystery, a kiss - not though mankind would rather know than feel;
whose absence would make your while life and my (and infinite our) nearly to undie
—  E.E Cummings

This week’s review: Chasing Cars en France
The 2013 Ford Fiesta EcoBoost

Chasing Cars has been traversing the French wine country for the last week.  Our partner in crime on the autoroutes and backroads has been Ford's refreshed 2013 Fiesta five-door, equipped with the unique 1-litre, 3-cylinder turbocharged EcoBoost petrol engine: what a cracker.

With such a diminutive engine tasked with powering a decent-sized hatch, you’d be forgiven for assuming the Fiesta EcoBoost is a battler.  Quite to the contrary, we found its 90kW of power and 170Nm of torque to be more than adequate in town and sufficient on faster country routes, but short of overtaking ease on the highway, where the Fiesta has to be worked hard.

Should Ford bring this exceptional and innovative powertrain to Australia for the local Fiesta?  Absolutely.

For more insights, look out for the forthcoming review.

Thnx for 177.777 problem free km you given us! Lets do another 177.777km without issues. Note that the she(A2) has only done 355km on ca1/4 of a tank!
#SUPERMINI#audi#a2#aluminum#F1-technology#3cylinder#diesel#mašo#ecoride#bestsmallcarintheworld#carporn#cargram#caroftheday#picoftheday#instapic#instanow#superlight#dieselpower#futuristic#deluxe#cruise (at E20)

7

Renault has unveiled the EOLAB, a new prototype of a futuristic ultra-efficient hybrid supermini, featuring over 100 innovations coming in the production cars by 2020: with a aerodynamic cx of just 0,235, a weight of  only 995 kilos and a very tiny three cylinder petrol engine producing 75PS and 95 Nm of torque, packed to a 67 hp and 200 Nm electric engine, the EOLAB only needs one litre per 100 km and it produces just 22 g of co2 per km.

It will be shown at the Paris Auto Show, on October 2nd.

Hyundai I20 2014 First Pictures Of Grown Up New Supermini

Hyundai I20 2014 First Pictures Of Grown Up New Supermini

Hyundai models & brand history – autoevolution, Paul rudd and hyundai join forces. hyundai motor america just announced that actor paul rudd will serve as the new voice of its national advertising..
Hyundai veloster @ top speed, The hyundai veloster continues to grow up right before our eyes. first was the turbo model, then…

View On WordPress

Audi Sisjön wanted Swedens most awesome A2 during their Vorsprung durch Technik event! Still holding world titles til today for being a SUPERMINI!!
#audi#a2#teknikbil#SUPERMINI#aluminum#cargram#picoftheday#carporn#futureride#RUSTFREE#ROSTFRI#superlight#F1-frame#mašo#sisjön#exhibition#event#rolemodel#model#caroftheday#ecoride#megaride (at Audi Göteborg)

Hyundai swims against the current with new i20 Coupe

Filed under: Coupe, Budget, Europe, Hatchback, Hyundai



Coupefying hatchbacks is all the rage in the European market these days. Its what Opel and Vauxhall did with the latest Astra, and what Renault did with the Mégane, and now Hyundai is preparing to follow a similar formula, only in a smaller form.

While the i30 is the model with which Hyundai competes with the aforementioned Astra and Mégane, to say nothing of the Volkswagen Golf and Ford Focus, it’s the smaller i20 - recently introduced in five-door form - which the Korean automaker plans to give the coupe treatment.

Previewed in the teaser image above, the upcoming new i20 Coupe will enter a somewhat shrinking market for three-door superminis. Though the VW Polo, Ford Fiesta, Peugeot 208 and Opel Corsa are still available with three portals, their forms are otherwise no more coupe-like than their five-door counterparts. (Mini has tried a similar approach with its Coupe, and Citroën has forked the C3 five-door and DS3 three-door, but those are decidedly more upscale offerings.) Alongside the Seat Ibiza, Hyundai is one of the few mainstream automakers offering three-door superminis significantly distinguished from its five-door versions.

In the case of the i20 Coupe, we’re looking at a more rakish roofline, a pronounced rear spoiler, a wrap-around rear window and unique lighting modules. Expect the new i20 Coupe to be positioned slightly below the Veloster, but don’t expect it to come to North America: like the five-door version, the i20 Coupe has been designed and developed in Europe for the European market.

Continue reading Hyundai swims against the current with new i20 Coupe

Hyundai swims against the current with new i20 Coupe originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 04 Sep 2014 18:32:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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via Autoblog http://ift.tt/1rAmTZb
Hyundai swims against the current with new i20 Coupe

Filed under: Coupe, Budget, Europe, Hatchback, Hyundai



Coupefying hatchbacks is all the rage in the European market these days. Its what Opel and Vauxhall did with the latest Astra, and what Renault did with the Mégane, and now Hyundai is preparing to follow a similar formula, only in a smaller form.

While the i30 is the model with which Hyundai competes with the aforementioned Astra and Mégane, to say nothing of the Volkswagen Golf and Ford Focus, it’s the smaller i20 - recently introduced in five-door form - which the Korean automaker plans to give the coupe treatment.

Previewed in the teaser image above, the upcoming new i20 Coupe will enter a somewhat shrinking market for three-door superminis. Though the VW Polo, Ford Fiesta, Peugeot 208 and Opel Corsa are still available with three portals, their forms are otherwise no more coupe-like than their five-door counterparts. (Mini has tried a similar approach with its Coupe, and Citroën has forked the C3 five-door and DS3 three-door, but those are decidedly more upscale offerings.) Alongside the Seat Ibiza, Hyundai is one of the few mainstream automakers offering three-door superminis significantly distinguished from its five-door versions.

In the case of the i20 Coupe, we’re looking at a more rakish roofline, a pronounced rear spoiler, a wrap-around rear window and unique lighting modules. Expect the new i20 Coupe to be positioned slightly below the Veloster, but don’t expect it to come to North America: like the five-door version, the i20 Coupe has been designed and developed in Europe for the European market.

Continue reading Hyundai swims against the current with new i20 Coupe

Hyundai swims against the current with new i20 Coupe originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 04 Sep 2014 18:32:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | Email this | Comments

via Autoblog http://ift.tt/1rAmTZb

Filed under: Coupe, Budget, Europe, Hatchback, Hyundai

Coupefying hatchbacks is all the rage in the European market these days. Its what Opel and Vauxhall did with the latest Astra, and what Renault did with the Mégane, and now Hyundai is preparing to follow a similar formula, only in a smaller form.

While the i30 is the model with which Hyundai competes with the aforementioned Astra and Mégane, to say nothing of the Volkswagen Golf and Ford Focus, it’s the smaller i20 - recently introduced in five-door form - which the Korean automaker plans to give the coupe treatment.

Previewed in the teaser image above, the upcoming new i20 Coupe will enter a somewhat shrinking market for three-door superminis. Though the VW Polo, Ford Fiesta, Peugeot 208 and Opel Corsa are still available with three portals, their forms are otherwise no more coupe-like than their five-door counterparts. (Mini has tried a similar approach with its Coupe, and Citroën has forked the C3 five-door and DS3 three-door, but those are decidedly more upscale offerings.) Alongside the Seat Ibiza, Hyundai is one of the few mainstream automakers offering three-door superminis significantly distinguished from its five-door versions.

In the case of the i20 Coupe, we’re looking at a more rakish roofline, a pronounced rear spoiler, a wrap-around rear window and unique lighting modules. Expect the new i20 Coupe to be positioned slightly below the Veloster, but don’t expect it to come to North America: like the five-door version, the i20 Coupe has been designed and developed in Europe for the European market.

Continue reading Hyundai swims against the current with new i20 Coupe

Hyundai swims against the current with new i20 Coupe originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 04 Sep 2014 18:32:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | Email this | Comments

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