THE GRADUATE (1967) LASERDISC COMMENTARY BY HOWARD SUBER, THE YODA OF ALL FILMMAKING TEACHERS
  • THE GRADUATE (1967) LASERDISC COMMENTARY BY HOWARD SUBER, THE YODA OF ALL FILMMAKING TEACHERS
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This is the commentary that all other commentaries should be measured by. Oh dear Lord, what a commentary! This track is on par with the Michael Jeck commentary for Seven Samurai, but it’s only available on Criterion’s LaserDisc. The film’s scholar, Howard Suber, takes you through all aspects of the production and script, from the significances of harsh and soft lighting, to the elements which are NOT in focus, to the overall arch of Benjamin’s character. Once you hear this track by Howard Suber, you’ll want to hear his others. This is an absolute must-listen for any student of film.ratethatcommentary

NOTE: This commentary track is only available on the Criterion Collection LaserDisc release of The Graduate [mp3]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only).

Here is the script for The Graduate written by Calder Willingham and Buck Henry. Based on the novel by Charles Webb. It is considered one of the best scripts ever written [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only). The DVD/Blu-ray of the film is available at Amazon and other online retailers.

The Writer Speaks: Henry Zuckerman, better known as Buck Henry. The writer of The Graduate, Get Smart and The Day Of The Dolphin talks about his life as a writer.

Almost from the start, Mike Nichols knew that Anne Bancroft should play the seductive Mrs. Robinson. But the young film director surprised himself, as well as everyone else, with his choice for The Graduate’s misfit hero, Benjamin Braddock: not Robert Redford, who’d wanted the role, but a little-known Jewish stage actor, Dustin Hoffman. From producer Lawrence Turman’s $1,000 option of a minor novel in 1964 to the movie’s out-of-left-field triumph three years later, Sam Kashner recalls a breakout film that literally changed the face of Hollywood. Here’s to You, Mr. Nichols: The Making of The Graduate

For a previously unknown actor named Dustin Hoffman, the success of The Graduate was a “happy accident,” according to CBC interviewer Moses Znaimer. Sudden fame means Hoffman has been careful not to be trapped into playing Benjamin Braddock for the rest of his career. In this conversation with Znaimer, a slightly guarded Hoffman describes his latest role, as Ratso Rizzo in Midnight Cowboy, and ruminates on acting, fame and selling out.

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SOME LIKE IT HOT (1959) LASERDISC COMMENTARY WITH HOWARD SUBER AND LEGENDARY ACTOR JACK LEMMON
  • SOME LIKE IT HOT (1959) LASERDISC COMMENTARY WITH HOWARD SUBER AND LEGENDARY ACTOR JACK LEMMON
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Jack Lemmon graciously consented to a lengthy interview for this videodisc. His comments on the making of the film, his theories about comic acting, and his analysis of Billy Wilder’s unique powers are incorporated into the analysis of the film. This analysis focuses on the structure and technique of Some Like It Hot, provides background on the film’s making, and demonstrates how the film follows classic principles of comedic construction. There are two ingredients that are necessary for any comedy that tells a story: (1) an underlying pain and (2) a three-step structure of desire, deception, and discovery. The analysis on Audio Track Two explains why it is that comedy requires deception, and demonstrates how this principle works in this film. Above all, it is Billy Wilder’s comedic genius that makes this film the classic that it is today. The acerbic one-liners, the careful construction of character and situation, the simultaneous sentimental/cynical use of music and love scenes, the running lines and gags, and above all the absolute economy that makes everything contribute to the forward frenetic motion of the film are elements that make Billy Wilder one of America’s model writer/directors of comedy.Howard Suber

NOTE: Only the long out-of-print Criterion Collection LaserDisc of Some Like it Hot  has this commentary [mp3]. For educational purposes only.

While I was working with Mr. Lemmon for the first time on Some Like It Hot, I thought to myself, This guy’s got a little bit of genius. I would love to make another picture with him, but I don’t have a story. So I looked in my little black book and I came across a note about David Lean’s movie Brief Encounter, that story about a married woman who lives in the country, comes to London, and meets a man. They have an affair in his friend’s apartment. What I had written was, What about the friend who has to crawl back into that warm bed? I had made that note ten years earlier, I couldn’t touch it because of censorship, but suddenly there it was—The Apartment—all suggested by this note and by the qualities of an actor with whom I wanted to make my next picture. It was ideal for Lemmon, the combination of sweet and sour. I liked it when someone called that picture a dirty fairy tale.Billy Wilder

Also, recommended viewing: Billy Wilder Speaks  (2006). In 1988, Oscar-winning German filmmaker Volker Schlöndorff sat down with legendary director Billy Wilder at his office in Beverly Hills, California and turned on his camera for a series of filmed interviews. He ended up getting two weeks of excellent on-camera reminiscences from the great director.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

anonymous said:

Is the Hell where followers of Zorak Zoran expect to go different from the Underworld?

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Not really. Zorak Zoran’s Hell is just one of the many Hells and assorted afterlives that can be found in the Underworld, along with the Court of Silence, the Lunar Tax Hell and Ana Gor’s Beautiful Place, to name a few.

The Underworld is one of the four Otherworlds, and by far the most mysterious. It preceded the creation of Glorantha, and cannot ever be truly understood. Many cultures think of the Underworld as the evil pit that birthed their worst enemies – the forces of Darkness, Death and Chaos – but this is a matter of perspective. It did birth Darkness and Death, but these powers aren’t evil in and of themselves. As for Chaos, I’ll get to that later.

The Underworld is a special place for trolls. In the Underworld, Dame Darkness gave birth to Subere, who gave birth to Kyger Litor, the troll ancestress. The trolls call the Underworld their Wonderhome, a magical place where there’s no hunger or fire, which they lost when Yelm the Burner and his weeping cohort was cast down. It’s also important to the elves, as it’s the home of Flamal and the Primal Plasma that animates all life.

Death came from the Underworld, and the many dead of the God Time gathered in that dark place. Since then, it has become the domain of the dead, the first place the deceased go to before they are judged and sent to the afterlife. The place they go to in death is determined by the things they did while they were alive, by the sins they committed and the gods they allied with.

Down in the very bottom of the Underworld, in its darkest depths where few will ever go, sits the Chaosium. It is the Fount of Chaos, constantly vomiting forth random monsters and raw, unformed matter that eventually reaches the Middle World. Without this Chaos, the world would be locked in Stasis, a grey and featureless plane.

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How Journal Prices Impede Research Access: A Harvard Library Strategic Conversation

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Featuring:

Ted Bergstrom

Professor of Economics, UC Santa Barbara

&

Peter Suber

Director, Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication

October 3, 2014, 3 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Milstein East B, Wasserstein Hall

Harvard Library Strategic Conversations are funded through the generosity of The Bradley M. and Terrie F. Bloom Family Fund.

Join a “fireside” chat between Ted Bergstrom and Peter Suber on the prices of scholarly journals, why prices have grown faster than inflation for decades, how they have limited access to research and prospects for change. 

This discussion will feature Ted Bergstrom, professor of economics at UC Santa Barbara and a leading thinker around the economics of scholarly journals. He will be joined by Peter Suber, director of the Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication and the Harvard Open Access Project, and author of Open Access.

Reception to follow.

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