A Patchwork of Galaxies - Halfway to the Edge of our Universe

In this image we see more than halfway to the edge of the observable Universe. This image is the result of 14 hour exposure of the Hubble Space telescope. Many of the objects are galaxies within this image are clusters about 5 billion light years away. The light from quasar QSO-160913+653228 took nine billion years to reach us and allows us to observe time on a truly cosmic scale. 

Credit: NASA,ESA,Hubble

From Superbubbles to Galactic Fountains

Nebula NGC 1929 contains just the kind of superbubble that Astrophysicists think could cause a Galactic Fountain. Even though this nebula is not causing a fountain, it is theorized that similar nebula are causing Galactic Fountains within our Milky way galaxy. The illustration bellow shows how massive Galactic Fountains spew hot ionized gas away from our galactic disk to form Galactic Corona:

Supernova explosions within the galactic disc drive hot gas out of the disc, creating so-called galactic fountains that contribute to the formation of a halo of hot gas around the Milky Way. As the gas rises above and below the disc, reaching heights of a few kiloparsecs (more than 6,000 light-years!), it emits radiation and thus becomes cooler, condensing into clouds which then fall back into the disc, in a fashion that resembles a fountain.

Credit: ESO VLT/ESA/Fountains and Pumps

What do you see in this image: a dolphin or a penguin?

This galactic pair has nicknamed after both of them – the curve of a porpoise or a dolphin can be seen in the blue- and reddish shape towards the bottom of the frame, when paired with the glowing orb just beneath it, resemble a bird or penguin guarding an egg.

The form of the penguin itself is made up of a single galaxy that has been distorted and ripped apart. This galaxy, named NGC 2936, was once a normal spiral like the Milky Way, until it started interacting with its egg-like neighbour, an elliptical galaxy named NGC 2937. Together, these two galaxies make up a pair dubbed Arp 142. 

The pair is pulling each other and interacting, slowly changing their appearances and disrupting their gas, dust and stars. In around a billion years these two might come together to form a single galaxy, and the merging process will be complete.

Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)